November 29, 2015

Flip-Pal Registered Owners Are Now Eligible For Software Update


In case you missed it, last week Flip-Pal released a free software update v 3.0 for their toolbox application. Here’s what you can expect with this new update:


  • Edit adds rotation and cropping with an improved color correction optimized for scans

  • Share adds quick and convenient login and uploading of scans to Dropbox, Evernote, and Repixl along with Facebook and Picassa

  • The Community page has many recommended FlipPal partners that you can connect with to round out your scanning solution

  • The resources available on Help have been updated, including the User’s and Quick Start Guides, How-to videos, and FAQs

  • Speed has been improved.

Use Flip-Pal Toolbox version 3.0 if you have one of these:

  • Apple Mac OS-X version 10.8 (Mtn. Lion) and newer
  • Microsoft Windows 7
  • Microsoft Windows 8
  • Microsoft Windows Vista
  • Microsoft Windows XP with SP3

Click this link to obtain Flip-Pal Toolbox version 3.0 and its user manuals

Use Flip-Pal Toolbox version 1.14 if you have one of these:

  • Apple Mac OS-X version 10.4 (Tiger)
  • Apple Mac OS-X version 10.5 (Leopard)
  • Microsoft Windows XP with SP2 or earlier
  • Preference for the original Flip-Pal Toolbox

Click this link to obtain Flip-Pal Toolbox version 1.14 and its user manuals.



The Good Smells Of Childhood


I was always a “noticing” kind of person. Good smells always put me in a certain frame of mind. Some were cozy, some exciting, some, downright appetite provoking.

This is just a sort of reminiscence of the ones I remember, in no particular order.

The smell of the people around me was most likely some of my first memories. Mom always smelled of cigarettes, coffee and on special occasions when I was very young there was the fragrance of Tweed perfume. I imagine she had it from before she was married and it always made me think of her life in Seattle where she lived with her parents before she married my dad. In later years she wore violet perfume on special occasions because we had found a source for it when we lived in Iowa and she would wear it when she knew we would be seeing each other. She also wore Charlie, which I didn’t especially like, but she did.

My grandma Yates always had the fragrance of face powder and toilet water. A sweet, older lady smell that was light and not overpowering. I don’t remember a particular fragrance my grandma Moline wore. I know she used Oil of Olay though because I remember seeing it on her dressing table.

My dad was fond of Mennen after shave, and his dad liked to wear the simple smell of “I just shaved”, as in the lingering odor of the shave cream he wiped off.

Where we lived, at the end of Dennis Street in Tumwater, Washington, was a seasonal mix of spring, summer and fall smells. I guess winter had a smell too, if you count the Christmas tree (a real one, cut in our back field) in the house. Spring seemed to erupt in our front yard with everything at once. The people who had lived in our house prior to us had planted bulbs and shrubs that were well-established by the time we moved in during the early 1950’s. I probably visit these memories of my childhood yard more often than I should, but this was part of “my world” and I cherish them.

It was the bulbs that came up first in the yard. Old ones like muscari and snow drops. Then, the irises would peek their pointy leaves up from the cold ground and signal the advent of more to come. All of this was followed quite closely by the buds on the quince bush, the sweet smell of the lilacs and the apple and cherry trees bursting into bloom.

Mom was never one to stifle our creativity, so she willingly let us raid her sewing cabinet for thread and needle to string leis of quince flowers as our own tribute to celebrating the spring equinox. The poor visitors to our house in spring were always gifted with sprigs of lilacs to put in makeshift vases until they could carry them home.

Summer brought the seasonal smells of dry grass, or the lovely aroma of wet dry grass after a summer shower. Although I’m writing about smells, I remember those summer mornings when I’d wake up and hear through the early morning summer stillness birds like the ubiquitous robins, the sparrows and chickadees.

I didn’t get much chance to go camping when I was younger, but I did get to sleep outside in the front yard in a sleeping bag with a comfy air mattress for cushion. Waking up in the early, early misty morning air was almost intoxicating. So close to the earth you can almost feel it breathe. I would just lay there and drink in the quiet.

Other smells come to mind too. That wonderful new baby doll plastic smell, the minty fragrance of Doublemint gum when grandma would open her purse when we were sitting in the pew at church on Sundays. How did she know I needed something to stave off ‘starvation’? I suspect she might have been treated to the same thing herself when she was growing up.

Is there nothing more warm and inviting than going through the door of someone’s house whose been cooking a turkey since the wee hours of the day? The sage smell of the dressing; the crispy skin done to perfection by a veteran cook; and all the other smells like candles burning, fresh homemade yeast biscuits coming out of the oven, a recently ironed white damask table cloth, and the blackberry cobbler tempting us to skip the main course and dive right into it.

My life has been constantly assailed by food smells, environmental smells like the brewery, a pulp mill, the smell of my dad when he would come home from working with wood all day and there was a mixture of good honest sweat along with sawdust. One facet of life, the smells, but oh so memorable.

© Carol Yates Wilkerson 2015 – All Rights Reserved

Understanding The “M 7” Designation In The 1940 Census


Stevenson with arrow.jpg

I recently found a 1940 census record that listed the man as married but that designation was crossed out and a 7 was inserted instead. It occurred to me that other people might be wondering what it meant too, so I did a search and found Understanding the 1940 Census at That correction indicates the man is married but that his spouse isn’t living with him.

In 1935 Rex Stevenson was living in Seattle, he was unmarried and was working in the occupation of “Theatrical Booking” for movies. I knew that in 1940 Rex was living in San Francisco, so if I wanted to find a marriage record for him I would begin with a peek in the Washington State Digital Archives to see if he was married before he left for California. He was, to Nola Conn and the wedding took place in Coupeville, Skagit, Washington the 9th of August 1932.

I’ve looked to see where Nola might have been during the time after the marriage and found nothing documented, but I did find in 1940 she was still in Washington state living in her father’s household. In 1940 Nola’s father was employed by the city of Mt. Vernon as a patrolman. Nola’s twin sister Lola is in the household as well, divorced and there is a five year old child Dean Henry listed as Clifford Conn’s grandson.

Dean Henry is the son of Lola Conn, now that I’ve done a bit more research. Imagine, all these clues from one census record mystery!

To explain why I’m researching the Stevenson family, it’s because my nephew’s wife Jill Hohensee Yates is related to that family. While not direct, there is a connection to Jane Russell, the actress. Jane’s mother was the granddaughter of Otto Reinhold Jacobi. Otto Jacobi was the father of Louise Jacobi who married James Stevenson. James Stevenson was one of the older brothers of Isabella Katherine Stevenson who married Benjamin A Ferris. One of their children, Lorne A Ferris and his wife Blanche were the parents of Ernestine Isabel Ferris who married Wilhelm Fredrick Karl Hohensee.

Next on my agenda is to find out how Isabella Stevenson Ferris’ oldest brother William Burden Stevenson who emigrated from Ireland around 1862, just in time to join the Army and serve in the Civil War from Pennsylvania. Now, I’m on a quest to find out why he went to PA to serve.

Pin-up photo of Jane Russell for the Sep. 21, ...

Pin-up photo of Jane Russell for the Sep. 21, 1945 issue of Yank, the Army Weekly, a weekly U.S. Army magazine fully staffed by enlisted men. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

YATES and WILKERSON Direct Line Surnames Being Researched

iPentimento 150

Mine and Jim’s direct line surnames. Yes, this is cousin bait, but of the most honorable kind.

Bean, Boyert, Cook, DeSpain, Haga, Harmes, Horst, Jordan, McCoy, Miller, Otto, Perkins, Ripley, Skaggs, Wilkerson, Whitmore

Branch: YATES
Ball, Bailey, Breedlove, Chance, Crawford, Dawson, Harrison, Hedgepeth, Holmes, Johansson, Kelsey, Larsson, Moline, Nordgren, Osgathorpe, Pentecost, Pledge, Poindexter, Reddin, Register, Smith, Speer/Speers/Spears, Steelman, Wright, Yates

Carol’s Pedigree Tree