February 24, 2017

The Pros and Cons of Not Re-Shelving Genealogy Books in the Library

What’s The Alternative To Not Re-Shelving Genealogy Books?

Amy Johnson Crow shared an article this week in regard to the reason you should not re-shelve genealogy books in the library, and I would like to address the other side of the issue. The libraries don’t want you to re-shelve the books because it helps them keep track of which books are being used, which in turn equates to money for the library through showing that usage.

My experience with this was at the Burlington, Iowa library in their genealogical section. When we walked in there were bookshelves full of books, but some were missing from their places. There were very large tables strewn with books both open and closed. If we wanted to look a a book we either had to close the books on the table or see if it was in the bookshelf. Doing that was very time consuming and frustrating for us because we had a finite period of time to do our research since we were visiting from out of town. Our home was thousands of miles away and we couldn’t just pop back in another time.

The dilemma that I see in this situation is that while the librarians don’t want us to re-shelve books, they can’t always get in to the genealogy section several times a day to count and re-shelve so the patrons are left with the books on the tables and empty slots in the bookshelves. All of us want to be responsible patrons and make the librarian’s job easier, but surely there has to be a better way than having books in the way, or seemingly missing.

Have An Honor System For Showing Use Of Genealogy Books

As I see it, something has to give. Books need to be counted and re-shelved more often (by official volunteers)in order to make research easier, or have an honor system where when you choose a book you can make a note of it (you would anyway if you found information and wanted to cite it) and then be given the ability of re-shelving it to make it easier for other researchers to find it. Of course, you can cite that this method could be scammed by people just noting books to help the library financially, but I submit that it could very well go the other way and patrons could find it so much easier and actually are able to peruse more books and show the library that there in fact are more books being used than the library is aware of.

My thinking is that it would streamline the ability to find information more quickly, possibly create more honest income from the books being used, and keep the library section more neat and tables more accessible for those who might be looking at very large books. How frustrating it is to have to move books from one table to another just to be able to sit down and look at a book!

Some other articles you might find helpful:

A Dozen Genealogy Books I Own

A Wish List for Genealogists

Adapting Boy Scout Law To Your Genealogy

© Carol Wilkerson 2017

Winnie Reddin Harrison Enumerated In Overton County TN Census of 1840 As Over 100 Years Old

Shaking Those Ancestry Leaves

I was checking ‘shaking leaves’ in Ancestry recently and it lead me to a new census record for 1840 showing my 4th Great Grandfather Elias Harrison (son of James). What was really special about this record was that it also included his mother Winnie Reddin Harrison (not by name mind you) as a member of the household who was age 100 or older! Winny/Winnie is my 5th Great Grandmother through my dad’s Pentecost line.  I do have the original 1840 census record image, but the one posted here in this article is easier to read.

On the Trail of James Harrison’s Revolutionary War Service

Originally, I had tried to go into the DAR through this Harrison line, but they rejected it because my cousins in Missouri who had been admitted to the DAR decades before didn’t provide adequate proof of James Harrison’s Revolutionary War service. So, that means that we later descendants have to dig a little deeper and find that proof. Finding this 1940 census record showing (presumably) Winnie Reddin in Elias Harrison’s household adds to the preponderance of evidence for her and presents one more link in the paper trail.

In addition, I was also able to use Fold3 to download the original documents and testimony of Turner Johnson substantiating the claim of Eli Harrison.

There is a two page transcription of Eli Harrison’s testimony in Overton County set at Southern Campaigns Revolutionary War Pension Statements & Rosters

Revwarapps@Carolina.Rr.Com. (2016) Southern Campaigns Revolutionary War Pension Applications & Rosters. Retrieved November 03, 2016, from http://revwarapps.org/

©2016 Carol Wilkerson

Using Repositories In Your Genealogical Research

Hugo 1989 – Charleston Trip

My Trip to Charleston After Hugo

It was a couple weeks after Hugo that I rode up to Charleston with a friend who lived in Fernandina Beach, Florida. His mother lived in Charleston and my friend Sheryl lived in a suburb of the city.

In 1989, Hugo had veered more northeast and mostly bypassed Amelia Island, but it made a direct hit on Charleston. I had kept in contact with my friend until her phone and power went out. The last I had heard was that the authorities were advising everyone to evacuate to near Columbia where there might be accommodations.  I waited and hoped she was OK, but it took a while to hear from her, as you would expect. Keep in mind, we too had evacuated from Amelia Island, and we didn’t have cell phones in those days!

Sheryl had ridden out the storm at home in Goose Creek, and from what she told me later it was something she would never want to do again. One of the reasons she didn’t want to leave home is that she had three cats that she would have had to take care of in a shelter too. I’m sure her thinking was that the cats would be happier in their own home rather than being jolted around in a car and temporarily in a motel. Just for the record, veterans of hurricanes already have a plan on what to do and make their getaways early on. That means, motels fill up mighty fast. You snooze, you lose.

As Rufus and I rode along, closer and closer to the Charleston area we began to see the swath of wind devastation. At one point on SR 17 it looked similar to the blowdown of trees from Mt. St. Helens. Instead of fir trees though, these were pine trees natural in that region. The way they got the highway open was to just cut the trees off near the road and open a path. I had been on this trip before with Rufus and to see these same trees just completely wiped out was shocking. Both of us were wondering just what we would find further on.

I knew from talking to Sheryl that the damage to home in her area of Goose Creek was amazing. When I got there and she and I had a chance to drive around her neighborhood there was debris everywhere. The image that sticks in my memory though is of a tree trunk sticking out of the side of someone’s house. Just like a javelin had been launched into it and it stuck. As you can see from the storm surge map I’ve included from the NOAA site, even far inland the surge had some impact.

All in all, everyone I knew had survived the storm. I did talk to our son about where he was and it turned out he had stayed with a friend in Yulee just off of Amelia Island. After twenty-seven years my memory had failed me. I thought he had gone with us to Tallahassee. My bad.

 

Colin Kaepernick and the history of black patriotism

WASHINGTON, August 31, 2016 – Few groups have stood as strong and proud for America as have black men and women, even though fewer groups have been as badly treated by her. Colin Kaepernick’s refusal to stand for the national anthem is a call to reflect on the long history of patriotism on the part of… [Read more…]

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