November 22, 2014

The Potential Health Results Of The Faroe Island DNA Project Might Be Astounding

The islanders of this remote island group have a potential to make ground-breaking strides in their health care system by submitting their DNA to the FarGen project spear-headed by Bogi Eliason, the Programme Director whose work takes him around the world to speak about this special project. He is currently speaking at Bio-World-Asia in Singapore this last week of May.

I first read about this project in this article on Bloomberg originally published in February of this year. The country will be the first to sequence their whole population’s DNA, which may or may not agree with all the resident’s sensibilities.

Location of the Faroe Islands in Northern Europe.

Location of the Faroe Islands in Northern Europe. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Faroe Islands are located almost half way between Scotland and Iceland, and it’s 50,000 residents will most likely take part in the project which will also include genealogical findings as well. Why not set up a Google alert to keep informed about this study and the results?

Children of nordradalur (Faroe Islands)

Children of nordradalur (Faroe Islands) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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English: Sørvágur on the island of Vágar, Faro...

English: Sørvágur on the island of Vágar, Faroe Islands. View on the island of Mykines in the background. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

The Wilkerson Family DNA Project Coming Soon!

Jim 23 Ancestry

 

 


 We’re Testing A Parent’s DNA

Since none of us are getting any younger (Jim just turned 64!) then there is no time like the present to get this project kicked off.

The Wilkerson Group DNA Project

As you may have noticed this blog is now an affiliate of Family Tree DNA . I did that on purpose because it may give us a discount on the test if I click on my own link to go to their site. If not, I did discover (by using the FTDNA search box in the sidebar just to the right of this post) that there is a WILKERSON Group DNA Project and using their site might give us a discount if my own link does not. All that said, it’s isn’t that the DNA test I want to do for Jim’s dad is all that expensive, but some other family members have said they might want to chip in to help us defray the costs.

The main goal of what we are trying to discover is how much Native American blood might be in the lines. A preliminary test of Jim’s DNA showed that he does have some, but I want to take it back another generation to his dad to get a more “direct” route to the possible Indian ancestry.  I don’t think we would even undertake this testing if it wasn’t for the small amount showing in this graphic from another source.

Jim 23 Ancestry

So, for now, all I can say is check back here to see what the results might be. Thanks for reading today!

 

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Genealogy Comes Naturally To Heirloom Gardeners

Flowering Almond 2007

The Story Behind The Plant In This Photo

(continued from Pentimento blog post How To Propagate A Flowering Almond Shrub)

The flowering almond above is a ‘child’ of a plant that was already well-established in our yard way back in the 1950’s.  That was in Tumwater, Washington and the house was an old farmhouse with many old trees, shrubs and flower bulbs planted everywhere.  My brother and I, along with our parents lived in that house from about 1952 to 1982 when my parents moved to live with my grandpa in Olympia.  In that year my sister-in-law Kathy got a start from the Dennis Street flowering almond as did my mom get one to plant at my grandpa’s place.  I chose not to get a start off the plant at that time, even though I was living in Washington too, and as it turned out we moved to Florida for four years and came back in 1992.

It was just a few years ago that I decided I finally had a place to plant a start of the family flowering almond.  It makes me smile to think about the original one from my childhood that always heralded spring with its pretty pink blossoms all along the stems and how it’s not just people who “migrate” but they also take their plants with them!

Did any of your ancestors bring plants with them when they migrated?


Discover

Dual Citizenship Through DNA Results?

DNA Testing

As someone who has elected to have my own DNA tests done, I can see that if the various DNA testing labs keep making it affordable, this is going to be an industry that will keep on growing. I know my Cherokee friend said that her family members are investigating having their’s done too.  Right now, as the article says, the backlog for all of us might be a big problem.

African Americans

More U.S. blacks seek African roots – UPI.com
Right now, the problem I see is that we have a long way to go to get all of us into more definitive family groups. I was surprised at the concept of having a dual citizenship through DNA results for African American people, but it makes sense to me. My own family tree is probably too diluted to apply for the same citizenship for Sweden, even though my Great Grandparents emigrated from there. Truthfully though, I don’t consider myself a Swedish-American. I’m just American citizen of the USA.

Dual Citizenship

Would you seek dual citizenship if it was available to you?

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