November 27, 2014

Faroe Island’s Investment In A Mega School Has Just Broken Ground

faroe-islands-education-center

faroe-islands-education-center

The capitol city of Torshvan on the main island in the Faroe Islands has just broken ground on a new higher education center that will accommodate 1200 students and 300 teachers. I mentioned the Faroe Island in my post about them testing all the islander’s DNA recently, The Potential Health Results Of The Faroe Island DNA Project Might Be Astounding as you may remember. It looks like the Danish self-governing archipelego is well on it’s way to adopting and promoting  their homeland as a destination for forward thinking inhabitants. The design of the school looks fascinating to me as it will have five P-shaped stories, the tail of each P projecting at different angles. What a wonderful environment in which to learn while looking out on a beautiful landscape.

The Evolution of Handwriting: Tools

From Twigs to Keyboards

There is a current discussion in the genealogy circles, as well as in general circles, about the demise of cursive writing. Forgive me if I don’t have my mind completely wrapped around this, but I think it’s interesting to discuss and mull over the evolution of handwriting in general. I take a personal interest in this topic because I am able to analyze cursive handwriting.

No doubt someone has done a paper on this, but I don’t want to get all scientific and deep about it. Here’s the gist of my thinking on the subject. Handwriting is brain writing. That said, does it follow that the human mind has evolved along with the tools we have available to us? From the most simple of communication using writing I’m guessing it would be cuneiform which would be more printing than any kind of cursive. Using cuneiform would have been fairly uniform with little or no attempt to personalize it with much success.

Moving forward then, let’s consider penmanship as we know if from the last few hundred years. During the Victorian and Edwardian ages cursive was much more flamboyant, which if you consider that time, humans had more spare time and the availability of better clothing, etc. Naturally this era of spreading one’s wings intellectually would have brought about the loops and curls of handwriting that would have indicated the person was well-educated and worldly with a certain style and flair.

Jumping ahead again, during the 1900’s handwriting evolved again, going from the flamboyant to the more “conformative” methods such as Spenserian and the Palmer type. Most likely, this was because it was being used in the business world and would have given businesses an advantage in that any communication they conveyed was universally readable and understood.

If handwriting was brain writing then how were these changes affecting the human mind. Even if you don’t understand handwriting analysis, the change in handwriting still has some effect. As English writing humans progressed it shows the coming out of the era of upper and lower classes. Lower classes had no time or opportunity to even learn to read and write.

We went from an agrarian society and into the industrial age. The upper classes might have held on to their writing for a while, but change was in the air for everyone and expediency became the driving force of society. Faster was the key to making more money and prosperity. No time for fancy writing, we needed to get our points across and so, little by little even our lower grade school children who were taught cursive writing all through the 20th century slowly were weaned off cursive and “graduated” more and more to typewriter keyboards, and even now to computer and personal devices.

Do We Still Need Cursive Writing?

In my opinion, we will always need to have a form of communication that only depends on our mind and some way to share our thoughts. We can’t put all of our communication gifts all in one basket if, for no other reason than we have no idea what the future might bring. What if electronic devices suddenly went away? How would we communicate?

Brain Writing

Before I began my courses in handwriting analysis I had some incorrect assumptions about my fellow humans and what their handwriting might be telling me/us. What you might think is ‘sloppy’ handwriting could very well include indicators of a sharp and incisive mind (V like lines), with the ability to concentrate (uniform writing size and depth), and various indicators of the ability to speak intelligently to share those ideas (how they make their rounded letters and if they are open or closed).

Conversely, the people who have retained their somewhat flamboyant writing with big rounded letters and looping curves might just be unable to concentrate, superficial and even selfish.

For now, at least, the electronic age is here to stay. If we are no longer writing in cursive, how are our minds working if we are still brain writing? It does involve the brain even if we type on keyboards as I am doing right now. I think we are using more of both side of our brains for one thing. Our creativity might extend to more “coded” thinking as more and more of us learn to write computer code. Will we be able to analyze the person just by keystrokes and words used in the text?

We won’t be able to analyze handwriting though if too many people lose that skill entirely. Do you think we should still teach cursive writing to all school children? What’s your opinion?

52 Weeks To Better Genealogy – Challenge #29 – Handwriting

With the holidays upon us….the article below might be handy as you visit with family.

How To Do A Genealogical Interview

 

 

 

124 Issues of Casefile Clues for $30 – Ends Today!

My genealogy friend Michael John Neill has a great offer for his newsletter Casefile Clues. Read on for more information and a chance to take advantage of a great opportunity to further your knowledge about genealogical research. – Carol

 

 

Are you in need of how-to information written clearly, concisely, with an emphasis on instruction and explanation? That’s exactly what you get with Casefile Clues–Michael John Neill’s how-to genealogy newsletter. Take advantage of our special offer to get all 124 back issues for only $30! That’s quite a genealogical bargain. All issues are delivered as PDF files.

Written in an accurate, detailed, and yet easy-to-follow format, Casefile Clues is geared towards the intermediate level research, but we have many beginners and advanced researchers (including some professionals) who subscribe to Casefile Clues. Casefile Clues focuses on genealogical case studies, problem-solving, and the occasional in-depth analysis of one specific document.

And we always include complete, accurate citations and ideas of where to go next. We also focus on setting goals and keeping on task.

You can download samples following the link on this page:
http://blog.casefileclues.com/2011/11/new-samples-of-casefile-clues.html

A complete list of all topics (and order links) can be found here:
http://blog.casefileclues.com/p/order-back-issues.html

A complete list would make this email entirely too long. Check it out and see what you’re missing. It has been a long time since we’ve had a back issue special. Don’t wait. Jump start your research today.

Michael
———————
Michael John Neill
Genealogy Tip of the Day

http://www.genealogytipoftheday.com

Family Tree Magazine: Thomas MacEntee Webinar On-Demand

My friend Thomas MacEntee is one of the most prolific writers on the subject of genealogy that I have ever seen. We’ve all come to the conclusion that he doesn’t sleep, but it certainly doesn’t dull his mind!

One of the on-demand webinars (a seminar on the web) he’s created is “They’re Alive! Finding Living Relatives OnDemand Webinar”.  (Personally, I was intrigued by this topic because I have one first cousin that I would love to be able to find*.)  This webinar is for those people searching for adoptees, or just reconnecting after a tiff in the family, as well as finding cousins with which to share those precious family photos.

  • Bonuses that come with the download are extra special downloads from Thomas MacEntee and Lisa Louise Cooke.

In looking at the landing page for the direct link to the webinar listed below, I saw another very compelling reason to purchase this download:

This item does not have shipping or handling fees, but does count toward your order total to receive free shipping on other products.

Enhanced by Zemanta

© 2007-2014 iPentimento|Genealogy and History All Rights Reserved -- Copyright notice by Blog Copyright