November 28, 2014

This Holiday Citrus Salad Will Wow Your Guests



If there’s one dish (besides turkey) that says “holiday” to me it’s one that I make called Five Cup Salad. Of course, you can make it any time of year since it’s so easy to prepare.  All you need is 1 Cup of each ingredient:

Five Cup Salad With Mandarin Oranges
  • Pineapple, chunks or crushed (I prefer the crushed) drained
  • Sour cream
  • Coconut (sweetened, shredded)
  • Miniature marshmallows

Add all ingredients to a large bowl and fold together to incorporate the sour cream throughout. I usually make a double batch because everyone loves the citrus flavors with the sweetness of the coconut and the tang of the sour cream.  At this time of year many of us receive boxes of mandarin oranges and they would also be great in this salad as a fresh ingredient.

Adding citrus to your diet any time of year is beneficial.  Before exercising, after a hard game of soccer or touch football, or just as a sweet alternative to all the cookies an candy during the holiday.  An orange a day might keep the doctor away too! ;)

The glory of this salad is that you can tinker with the amounts of each ingredient in order to tailor it to your personal tastes. If you want to make it more festive, use the multicolored marshmallows; if you’re into such things, maybe add some maraschino cherries to the top for presentation.

This is my own personal recipe.



Compensated post

 

Of Melmac, Corelle and Other Fine China

Corelle Festiva green dinnerplate

Our niece Jill and I get into some really fun conversations that can last for hours and hours. Today was no exception, and one of our topics was family china.  We discussed the various patterns we’ve had, and the ones we remember from childhood, as well as ones we’d like to have!

I wasn’t taking notes so I can’t remember all of Jill’s ‘china history’, so for now I’ll just list my own from memory.  Have you ever noticed that dinnerware kind of ‘evolves’ over time? When I was a young girl my mom had her wedding china that we used quite often.  For the life of me though, I can’t remember the name of the pattern, and I’m not even sure any more what it looked like.  I know that seems silly to some people, but the china was so connected to my memories of my mom and all I can remember is either the china or the silver had the word “spring” in it.

You know, when you think about it (and Jill and I think women are more into this than men) our lives are really tied to the dishes we ate from all through our lives.  It’s something we all have in common, and with so many designs to choose from, it happened that even during certain periods of time we had the same types of dishes, i.e. Corelle.

Brown Serving Bowl Texas Ware Dinnerware - Vintage Plastic Dinnerware

Take for instance when we were first married. We had very little money and so our ‘china’ of choice was Melmac or Melamine.  We probably bought a whole set (plates, cups, saucers, sauce dishes, etc.) for $20 at K-Mart.  That was around 1972, and at the time my favorite colors were yellow and orange so the color I chose for dishes was an orange and yellow floral with brown side dishes.  My guess is it was Texasware. We had those plates and dishes until around 1980 when we sold them at a yard sale to someone who wanted them for their travel trailer.  The image of the brown bowl above is from Grannie’s Attic and I have included a link to the site if you click on the picture.

Not long after, the ubiquitous Corelle came on the market and people loved it because it could go in those new microwaves everyone was getting.  They were tough, pretty in their own way and there were enough open stock serving pieces that each household could have everything matching, right down to the salt shakers.  I’m not sure what year it was, but sometime in the 1970’s we bought our set of the white with green flowers Corelle (spring blossom green).  Guess what! We still have it. It may eventually go away, but one of my biggest quirks is that I hate getting rid of things just because they’re out of style.  (I have gotten rid of the platform shoes and leisure suits! ;) ). The photo above is from The Pyrex Files and on that site you will find a fascinating explanation of the difference between the spring blossom green pattern and the crazy daisy one.

A few years ago I bought some new dishes that look just like Depression glass, but they’re actually ::::drumroll please:::: Corelle.  We recently had some guests here for dinner and when I told them the dinner plates were Corelle they were amazed.  I have two sets of this green color with a slight swirl design on the edges. I’m starting to get arthritis in my hands and these seem like a safe bet for the future.

What’s your special dinnerware memory? I hope other people do posts like this in the future.  I’d like to see your memory-connected china too.  If you don’t know me by now, the title for this article was meant to be some subtle humor. :)  I suppose now because I wrote about Melmac I’ll get lots of people visiting thinking I’m writing about the planet that Alf came from.

Genealogy Comes Naturally To Heirloom Gardeners

Flowering Almond 2007

The Story Behind The Plant In This Photo

(continued from Pentimento blog post How To Propagate A Flowering Almond Shrub)

The flowering almond above is a ‘child’ of a plant that was already well-established in our yard way back in the 1950’s.  That was in Tumwater, Washington and the house was an old farmhouse with many old trees, shrubs and flower bulbs planted everywhere.  My brother and I, along with our parents lived in that house from about 1952 to 1982 when my parents moved to live with my grandpa in Olympia.  In that year my sister-in-law Kathy got a start from the Dennis Street flowering almond as did my mom get one to plant at my grandpa’s place.  I chose not to get a start off the plant at that time, even though I was living in Washington too, and as it turned out we moved to Florida for four years and came back in 1992.

It was just a few years ago that I decided I finally had a place to plant a start of the family flowering almond.  It makes me smile to think about the original one from my childhood that always heralded spring with its pretty pink blossoms all along the stems and how it’s not just people who “migrate” but they also take their plants with them!

Did any of your ancestors bring plants with them when they migrated?


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