September 30, 2016

Colin Kaepernick and the history of black patriotism

WASHINGTON, August 31, 2016 – Few groups have stood as strong and proud for America as have black men and women, even though fewer groups have been as badly treated by her. Colin Kaepernick’s refusal to stand for the national anthem is a call to reflect on the long history of patriotism on the part of… [Read more…]

Olympic Peninsula B&B is startling replica of George Washington’s house

PORT ANGELES, Wash. — You just never know what you’ll see when you turn off Highway 101 on the far side of Sequim. Zig and zag the back lanes toward Dungeness Spit and there’s plenty to gawk at: the occasional lavender farm, wide views of windswept water, heavily loaded ships plodding past Victoria, and, oh look,… [Read more…]

HONORING OUR NATIVE AMERICANS – AUTHENTIC NAME MAPS BY AARON CARAPELLA

Native American Nations map

I have to admit, I’m still in awe of these Tribal Nations Maps created by Aaron Carapella. It was certainly a labor of love on his part as he set out to educate us all regarding the traditional and Native American names for themselves, and the locations where the tribes lived.

It was long ago, when I first read the Clan of the Cave Bear series of books, that I had sort of an epiphany about how I was seeing Native Americans through the eyes of modern cinema, books, and adulterated history fed to us so that we would think of Indians as “wild” or uncivilized. In my opinion you need to really see them all as ‘first peoples’ who came to North America as early as 16 thousand years ago. We’re still learning, still discovering the migration patterns of these ancient ancestors and it’s important to honor them for their survival skills, their understanding of the power of our planet and stop stereotyping them in our consciousness.

I’m still learning, and Aaron’s Tribal Nations maps can help us all see the real history of Native Americans.

NOVEMBER IS NATIVE AMERICAN MONTH – US, Mexico and Canada Tribal maps (24×36) are only $20 ! Use code: 20deal at checkout ! For 30% off on all other maps, use 30off
One shipping charge no matter how many maps you buy!

 

Not an affiliate or compensated post

William Burden Stevenson 1842 – 1926

William Burden Stevenson – Soldier, Sailor, World Traveler

Usually, when you begin researching someone in a family line you start at their birth and work forward, and backward as well to connect them with their parents and ancestors. With William Stevenson I think I began in the middle and worked both directions. I knew some people in his immediate had lived here in Washington State, but what really piqued my interest was that William had resided here in my town of Port Orchard and is buried in a local cemetery here.

William’s parents were John and Ellen Burden Stevenson who were both born in Scotland circa 1815. As an adult, John was an officer in the Irish Coastguard and as his career was ending son William, who had been brought up to also be a Naval Officer for Britain, was just beginning his time in service. William’s father John had retired sometime after 1860 and was awarded a land patent by Queen Victoria. John had his choice of British locations, but in the end he chose Canada. To be specific, on Lake Malcolm in Ontario. All of the family still at home, including the youngest, Jane Elizabeth who was born in 1860 when her father was still stationed in Killybegs, Wexford, Ireland set sail for North America.

I’m guessing that William, the oldest, entered his naval service before the rest of the family left Ireland. His entry paper states he joined 27 June 1860 and was on the 1HMS St. Vincent. At the time of William’s service on the ship it was primarily a training vessel for young boys. William’s designation was as an Ordinary Seaman. Later records (American Civil War) note that during his time on the Vincent they spent time in the Mediterranean Ocean.

1862 – William Stevenson deserts the Royal Navy

One can only imagine what life was like in the Royal Navy for nineteen year old William. In looking at the records for the St. Vincent it wasn’t uncommon for these young sailors to be caned or birched if the Captain deemed it necessary. I don’t know that William ever received that punishment, but perhaps there was a far greater peril on the ship: disease. 1864 Training Ship, Home Station, Portsmouth. 2Report of Fevers and Small Pox onboard. Number of Cases of Disease and Injury. No proof has been found as to just how and where William left the ship, but we next find him as new soldier in the American Civil War.

In William’s Civil War pension application records he states that about two weeks after leaving the Royal Navy as a deserter he made his way to Pennsylvania, and joined Company I of the 111th PA Infantry under the false name of Thomas Crawford.

To be continued…

Sources:

1HMS St Vincent (1815). (2015, April 4). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 23:35, October 5, 2015, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=HMS_St_Vincent_(1815)&oldid=654963476

2(2015) HMS St Vincent. Retrieved October 05, 2015, from http://www.pbenyon.plus.com/18-1900/S/04400.html

© 2015 Carol Wilkerson. All rights reserved

 

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