December 20, 2014

Alonzo H Cushing – Medal of Honor Recipient Joins Our John Whitmore In Civil War MOH History

Today, the Medal of Honor was bestowed upon First Lt. Alonzo H Cushing by President Barack Obama for his conspicuous bravery during the battle of Gettysburg. See story at CMH News and Features.

I hope our Wilkerson family will take renewed pride in the fact that their ancestor John Whitmore was also awarded the Medal of Honor for his service during the Civil War. What makes John Whitmore’s Medal of Honor recognition so remarkable is that he was not an officer, but a lowly Private. It’s important because his courage and bravery must have been substantial in order for him to be recognized by his higher command. This is not meant to take anything away from Cushing’s heroism, but remind everyone that there were others who received the Medal of Honor as well.

iPentimento Memorial Day Remembrance 2008
Graveyard Rabbit Carnival – The Whittemores of Pleasant Grove Iowa
Tombstone Tuesday: The Wilkersons of Pleasant Grove, Iowa

 

7+ Websites for Revolutionary War Research

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This is my first blog post using the Firefox addon Scribefire so it’s going to be abbreviated, but I wanted to tell you about an excellent article by Gena Philibert-Ortega that lists the Top 7 Websites for Revolutionary War Ancestors, plus one more suggestion from me as a resource.

My source is “ask your genealogy friends”. Sounds simple, but you never know who might have their own books on a topic. This link happens to go to Cyndi’s List which is always an excellent starting point for genealogical research.

 

WHAT WAS GAINED, WHAT WAS TAKEN FROM THE 24 NEW ARMY MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENTS

John W. Whitmore, headstone at Pleasant Grove, IA

An Honorable Way To Fight Back Against Racism

I lived through the 60’s when race riots were in full swing. I truly thought we were making racism more and more of an anathema, but as we have all seen in the news racism has come back with a fury since President Obama was elected. As an American, I am proud to see there is a small righting of wrongs that will be done to honor the service of 24 men who were denied the Medal of Honor because of the color of their skin. As you probably know, no one “wins”  a Medal of Honor, but it is also not just wearing of a medal.  Consider these other benefits:

  • Special Medal of Honor pension of $1,194 per month above and beyond any military pensions or other benefits for which they may be eligible. The MOH pension is subject to cost-of-living increases.
  • Special entitlements to Space A air transportation.
  • Enlisted recipients are entitled to a supplemental uniform allowance.
  • Commissary and exchange privileges (includes eligible dependents).
  • Admission to the United States military academies for qualified children of recipients — without nomination and quota requirements.
  • 10 percent increase in retired pay.
  • Medal of Honor Flag.
  • Allowed to wear the uniform at anytime as long as the standard restrictions are observed.
  • Many states offer Medal of Honor automobile license plates.
  • Interment at Arlington National Cemetery if not otherwise eligible.

Which brings me to the “What Was Taken” part of the title of this article. Decades have passed since the end of the Vietnam War. The men who are deceased and were awarded posthumously the medal will have the honor attached to their names, but it is their families, and those of the few still living that I think of now with some sorrow for what was taken away from them. First in my mind is the missed educational opportunities the children of these men were denied. What great mind did we fail to enrich? Did any of the families falter financially when the extra money from the award might have meant better health, or a longer life? So many “what if’s” to be sure.

Twenty Four Heroes

One last thought, this award of the Medal of Honor cannot be seen as anything more than honoring the gallantry of individuals who didn’t think of the color of their skin when they fought and gave their lives. We need to focus on the kind of men they are and were: HEROES

Thank you gentlemen.

Medal of Honor: Congress Only APPROVED It Graveyard Rabbit Carnival – The Whittemores of Pleasant Grove Iowa

21 Days Only – Thank A Veteran T-Shirt Available Here

Thank A Veteran

Just for fundraising, I created a T-shirt that means a lot to me. I belong to the Daughters of the American Revolution, and Jim is a member of the American Legion. In order to raise some donation funds for each organization, today I created Thank A Veteran T-Shirt.  There are only 15 shirts for sale, and only for 21 days, so come October 3rd the sale ends no matter what.  I purchased the first one to start the ball rolling! :) Thanks in advance for your purchases!

Thank A Veteran

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