December 9, 2016

WHAT WAS GAINED, WHAT WAS TAKEN FROM THE 24 NEW ARMY MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENTS

An Honorable Way To Fight Back Against Racism

I lived through the 60’s when race riots were in full swing. I truly thought we were making racism more and more of an anathema, but as we have all seen in the news racism has come back with a fury since President Obama was elected. As an American, I am proud to see there is a small righting of wrongs that will be done to honor the service of 24 men who were denied the Medal of Honor because of the color of their skin. As you probably know, no one “wins”  a Medal of Honor, but it is also not just wearing of a medal.  Consider these other benefits:

  • Special Medal of Honor pension of $1,194 per month above and beyond any military pensions or other benefits for which they may be eligible. The MOH pension is subject to cost-of-living increases.
  • Special entitlements to Space A air transportation.
  • Enlisted recipients are entitled to a supplemental uniform allowance.
  • Commissary and exchange privileges (includes eligible dependents).
  • Admission to the United States military academies for qualified children of recipients — without nomination and quota requirements.
  • 10 percent increase in retired pay.
  • Medal of Honor Flag.
  • Allowed to wear the uniform at anytime as long as the standard restrictions are observed.
  • Many states offer Medal of Honor automobile license plates.
  • Interment at Arlington National Cemetery if not otherwise eligible.

Which brings me to the “What Was Taken” part of the title of this article. Decades have passed since the end of the Vietnam War. The men who are deceased and were awarded posthumously the medal will have the honor attached to their names, but it is their families, and those of the few still living that I think of now with some sorrow for what was taken away from them. First in my mind is the missed educational opportunities the children of these men were denied. What great mind did we fail to enrich? Did any of the families falter financially when the extra money from the award might have meant better health, or a longer life? So many “what if’s” to be sure.

Twenty Four Heroes

One last thought, this award of the Medal of Honor cannot be seen as anything more than honoring the gallantry of individuals who didn’t think of the color of their skin when they fought and gave their lives. We need to focus on the kind of men they are and were: HEROES

Thank you gentlemen.

Medal of Honor: Congress Only APPROVED It

Graveyard Rabbit Carnival – The Whittemores of Pleasant Grove Iowa

21 Days Only – Thank A Veteran T-Shirt Available Here

Just for fundraising, I created a T-shirt that means a lot to me. I belong to the Daughters of the American Revolution, and Jim is a member of the American Legion. In order to raise some donation funds for each organization, today I created Thank A Veteran T-Shirt.  There are only 15 shirts for sale, and only for 21 days, so come October 3rd the sale ends no matter what.  I purchased the first one to start the ball rolling! 🙂 Thanks in advance for your purchases!

Thank A Veteran

USS Missouri – Then And Now

When I was growing up here in Washington state there were certain things we knew of about history and our surrounding area. One of them was that the famous ‘surrender’ ship USS Missouri was berthed here in Bremerton, inside (as it was then known) Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. You could see it from Navy Yard Highway as you came into town, and seeing it, you were impressed by its enormous size.

USS Missouri 1987

USS Missouri – (BB 63) 1987

I have a couple photos we took back in the mid 1980’s when Jim’s dad was here for a visit. He is a WWII veteran (see 

Low Moor, Iowa Honors WWII Vets

) and was anxious to take the tour of the old battleship. His ship, the Cape Esperance was a Casablanca class escort carrier. As with everyone of his generation, he knew well the name of the USS Missouri.

USS Missouri picture 2

Also in our party as we toured the ship was Loren’s daughter Lorrie and her son Brent, as well as our son Greg.  I doubt that the two young boys had as much interest in the ship at the time as their grandfather because they had no point of reference then.

USS New Jersey 1983

USS New Jersey – (BB- 62)

As an added bonus to this post, here is an additional photo, this one of the USS New Jersey as it looked in 1983. If my memory serves, it was stationed in California at the time at Long Beach. This Day in History – July1, 1985 the New Jersey was undergoing upkeep in Long Beach.

Sadly, the Missouri left the Bremerton area for good in 1985, but that wasn’t the last time she would see service in war time. She was reactivated in the early 1990’s to be used in the Gulf War. During one period of use her 16 inch guns fired over 800 projectiles. She was finally decommissioned in March of 1992. Her permanent berth is now adjacent to the USS Arizona in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The New Jersey is located in Camden, New Jersey

Sources:

USN Ships — USS Missouri

USN Ships –USS New Jersey

Original photos in this article are owned by Carol Wilkerson

You Can Be A Part Of The Revolutionary Voices Film

Be A Part Of Preserving United States History!

I’m proud to say I’m a backer participant in the Kickstarter  of Maureen Taylor’s film “Revolutionary Voices” A Last Muster Film. She and Verissima Productions are raising funds to get this film made about Revolutionary era people who lived during the time our country was becoming a nation. I hope you will join me in helping make this historical film possible by contributing what you can to the endeavor. See more about this film by clicking the video below.

My Revolutionary War Era Ancestors 

You may not know it, but the faces you see in these images might be those of someone who was a child during the Revolutionary War era. Why do I say that? Because the people in these tintypes are of a certain age that might have fit that criteria. The tintypes are from my Yates family and my grandfather Will Yates probably inherited them when his own father Jim Yates passed away. They sat in a closet or dresser for many years until I asked for them.

Two men

 

 

 

Yates man

 

 

 

 

myra-yates

 

 

 

 

These men listed below are my Revolutionary War Patriots (although I am in the DAR only through one of them*):

 

*Capt. Thomas POINDEXTER

Service:

NORTH CAROLINA    Rank(s): CAPTAIN, CIVIL SERVICE

Birth:

1733    HANOVER CO VIRGINIA

Death:

1-1-1807     SURRY CO NORTH CAROLINA

Service Source:

HAUN, NC REV ARMY ACCTS, VOL VIII, PART 6, P 800; CLARK, STATE RECS OF NC, VOL 22, PP 502,505

Service Description:

1) CAPT, PAID FOR SERVICES
2) SHERIFF, JUROR, 1777

 

 

BAILEY, ELISHA

Service:

VIRGINIA    Rank: PRIVATE

Birth:

11-20-1763    VIRGINIA

Death:

11-30-1841     ADAIR CO KENTUCKY

Pension Number:

S*W8344

Service Description:

1) CAPTS. BARNETT & LEAK, COL. CAMPBELL

Residence 1) County: ALBEMARLE CO – State: VIRGINIA

Spouse: 1)Hannah Gay

 

 

Richard Osgathorpe – Not yet recognized for Rev War Service (I have his pay voucher though).

Served from North Carolina

 

 

 

 

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