December 21, 2014

WHAT WAS GAINED, WHAT WAS TAKEN FROM THE 24 NEW ARMY MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENTS

John W. Whitmore, headstone at Pleasant Grove, IA

An Honorable Way To Fight Back Against Racism

I lived through the 60’s when race riots were in full swing. I truly thought we were making racism more and more of an anathema, but as we have all seen in the news racism has come back with a fury since President Obama was elected. As an American, I am proud to see there is a small righting of wrongs that will be done to honor the service of 24 men who were denied the Medal of Honor because of the color of their skin. As you probably know, no one “wins”  a Medal of Honor, but it is also not just wearing of a medal.  Consider these other benefits:

  • Special Medal of Honor pension of $1,194 per month above and beyond any military pensions or other benefits for which they may be eligible. The MOH pension is subject to cost-of-living increases.
  • Special entitlements to Space A air transportation.
  • Enlisted recipients are entitled to a supplemental uniform allowance.
  • Commissary and exchange privileges (includes eligible dependents).
  • Admission to the United States military academies for qualified children of recipients — without nomination and quota requirements.
  • 10 percent increase in retired pay.
  • Medal of Honor Flag.
  • Allowed to wear the uniform at anytime as long as the standard restrictions are observed.
  • Many states offer Medal of Honor automobile license plates.
  • Interment at Arlington National Cemetery if not otherwise eligible.

Which brings me to the “What Was Taken” part of the title of this article. Decades have passed since the end of the Vietnam War. The men who are deceased and were awarded posthumously the medal will have the honor attached to their names, but it is their families, and those of the few still living that I think of now with some sorrow for what was taken away from them. First in my mind is the missed educational opportunities the children of these men were denied. What great mind did we fail to enrich? Did any of the families falter financially when the extra money from the award might have meant better health, or a longer life? So many “what if’s” to be sure.

Twenty Four Heroes

One last thought, this award of the Medal of Honor cannot be seen as anything more than honoring the gallantry of individuals who didn’t think of the color of their skin when they fought and gave their lives. We need to focus on the kind of men they are and were: HEROES

Thank you gentlemen.

Medal of Honor: Congress Only APPROVED It Graveyard Rabbit Carnival – The Whittemores of Pleasant Grove Iowa

Honoring Dorie Miller – A True American Hero

 

"Above and beyond the call of duty" ...

 

 

Today, December 7, 2012 is the 71st Anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. As we remember those who we lost that day, we also remember the heroes who made a difference. One of them was Dorie Miller. I hope you will click this link to Angela Walton-Raji’s blog post and read about this wonderful man.  Remembering Dorie Miller, An American Hero.

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War Of 1812 Veterans KY – John Hurt and Josiah Beckett

Beckett 1812

These two veterans of the War of 1812 are listed in my new book Cumberland County, Kentucky yesterday and today. The citation is on page 112 in the Veterans section of the publication. While this book is new to me, it was first published in 1992.

The images were taken with my iPod camera, and if they are hard to read please let me know and I can try to do a scan. Clicking on the images will make it larger and you can also pin it to Pinterest if you like.

Honoring Their Sacrifices In World War II

SonsDaughtersWWIIVets

The Sons and Daughters of WWII Veterans

An email I received today brought to my attention this site named Sons & Daughters of World War II Veterans Genealogy Society created in 2010.  Here is a snippet explaining their purpose and intent.

The Sons and Daughters of World War II Veterans is a program of the Admiral Nimitz Foundation and the Nimitz Education and Research Center.

The Admiral Nimitz Foundation is a 501 (c) 3 nonprofit corporation whose mission is to preserve, interpret and teach the great history of World War II in the Pacific, that we may honor all those who, through leadership, exemplified by the character and service of Fleet Admiral Nimitz, courage, skill and sacrifice, won through to victory; and that future generations of Americans may be enlightened and inspired by their story. The Admiral Nimitz Foundation supports and manages the National Museum of the Pacific War in Fredericksburg, Texas.

As there were over 16 million men and women who served during WWII, there’s little doubt this will be a popular site.  It’s purpose is to allow individuals to prove their lineal connection to veterans; to preserve the history of their sacrifices, and to create a public database of those records.
There is a one-time $125.00 Primary Applicant certification fee, with a reduced fee of $25 for individuals related to the Primary Applicant.
For more information regarding your application to join this site, please visit their home page using the link provided at the beginning of this article.  The Society can also be found on Facebook using this link.

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