November 21, 2014

Old Ents and Monster Trees of Pacific Northwest

Logs on train

One of my Bordeaux, WA connections sent me an email today with the title being about “Monster Trees” with content about logging. I’ve been asked many times if I know what was the tallest fir tree logged in Washington state. Sadly, I do not. But if the pictures in the blog post at SBYNEWS entitled before Chainsaws Logging Monster Trees don’t provide any reasonable examples of one or two, I don’t know what will.

Here’s an example of one from the article that makes me question whether it was just one tree or not. If it was, all I can say is “Wow”.

I know the photo above is small but you can see a larger one by following the link above to the site.  You might have read my earlier article

1938 Bordeaux Washington Old Growth Logs that included one of our personal family photos showing trucks loaded with some fairly large old growth logs.

These pictures bring up all sorts of questions like, “how did they get those big trees down, how did they load them on the trucks, and how could that small looking truck haul that big log on a dirt road”?

Enhanced by Zemanta

Re: Dark Roasted Blend: Ghost Towns of the Pacific Northwest: Bordeaux, Washington

Dark Roasted Blend: Ghost Towns of the Pacific Northwest: Bordeaux, Washington. I have an Google key word alert for the terms “Bordeaux Washington” and a link to the article above arrived in my email today. As I just wrote a post today about Blanch Philby’s untimely death in the town of Bordeaux, I thought this link with pictures of the town would also be of interest to my readers.

Many of the photos in their article originated at the University of Washington Library from their Photo Collection #516. I have seen many of them before, and of the personal snapshots taken by the author of the article I think our family has several of the same ilk.

My article is Death on the Tracks: 1903 Bordeaux Washington

Death On The Tracks: 1903 Bordeaux Washington

Mumby trucks with old growth logs

Death On The Tracks: 1903 Bordeaux WA

It was an unseasonably warm spring day in April. Blanch Philby, a mother of two toddlers was on her way to the mill to meet her husband Charles who had just been paid that day. She intended to get his paycheck and then go on to the company store where she planned on buying some things for her baby that was soon to be due.

As was most of the homes in the town, Blanch’s house was perched on the hillside making it necessary for her to go down a flight of wooden steps, cross the railroad tracks and then on to the mill.

She got as far as the tracks when she was distracted by a yell from her friend who wanted her to pick up something at the store for her. “A lone engine operated by a fireman blasted around the bend from behind her.”

Glen Whipple had the sorrowful task of picking up what was left of Charles Philby’s wife and unborn child. [Source: The Tacoma News Tribune and Sunday Ledger – 05 October 1969; from an original story for the Tribune by Jeanne D. (Mrs. W. Ken) Adams, an Olympia, WA area freelance writer.]

As you can imagine, a mill town was a very noisy place to live with big saws running, men shouting, railroad engines and other vehicles all in operation at the same time.

Looking at the 1900 Federal Census District #224 for Littlerock, Thurston, WA we find “Charley” age 25, and Blanch, age 15, Philby (no children) residing in their own home. A few residences away is another Philby family, but there is no way to tell if this is a family connection. The head of household in that family was Amos Philby, age 55, so it’s possible he is the father of Charles/Charley Philby. In 1900 Charley was working as a “timber faller” for a logging company. [Source: Ancestry.com]

Further research in the Washington State Archives Digital Records resulted in a different date for Blanch’s death: 1903. Her grave is in the Odd Fellows Cemetery, Thurston (Tumwater, WA). FindAGrave lists her memorial as Memorial# 38299156 and her date of death is also 1903 there as well.

 

© Carol Yates Wilkerson 2012

 

 

 

 

1983 Article By Mike Contris – Olympian Newspaper Columnist

Bordeaux article by Contris

Mike Appreciated My Dad’s Remembrances Of Old Bordeaux, WA

This may be a repeat post, but I couldn’t find a previous one in my blogs, so I’m sharing the article by former Olympia, WA columnist Mike Contris again. As you can see it was first published in 1983. The reason I’m sharing it is because the Bill Yates mentioned in the article is my dad. My dad passed away in 1996; Mike Contris passed away in 1985. © Carol Yates Wilkerson 2012

Clicking on the image should make it visible full sized.

 

 

© 2007-2014 iPentimento|Genealogy and History All Rights Reserved -- Copyright notice by Blog Copyright