October 6, 2015

Railroad Service From Bordeaux To Seattle Connected With Chicago, Milwaukee, St Paul and Pacific Line

Washington State Railroads and Lumber Mills

Today, I received an interesting vintage postcard from a new friend who had found it on Ebay.  Postmarked 10 May 1915, it was a confirmation from the Mumby Lumber and Shingle Company of Bordeaux, Washington sent to George F. Nilder (or Hilder), a representative of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad, informing him that his order CFL6540 was being loaded on P & R car No. 530.  This postcard was sent for a penny and was received 11 May 1915. Pretty good overnight service for 1915, huh?

You know, railroad cars from many lines sometimes ended up in places that you wouldn’t think were ‘normal’, but railroad cars are probably like rental cars or trucks we see today where they can be from any state in the union depending on their type or usage.  Lumber would likely be shipped all over the nation because of its ubiquitous usage.

My husband said that when he worked at Clinton Corn Company in Iowa that they would get grain and coal cars from other regions, but usually from the Midwest. But their cars that went out with corn in them were shipped country-wide.

  So, a lumber or shingle order was filled at Bordeaux, Washington into a Pennsylvania and Reading Railroad car and sent out to a larger connector railroad line there in Thurston County.  At this point I can only guess on which one, but it could have been the Northern Pacific Prairie Line.

There’s also no way to know if it stayed on that line all the way to Seattle, but most likely for expediency it wouldn’t have languished anywhere too long but delivered as soon as feasible to the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad yard so they could send it on its way and fulfill their order.

In 1915 my grandfather, Elvin B. Moline was age 22 and just beginning his career in the lumber business.  It wouldn’t be until 1933 that he would take up residence in the town of Bordeaux with his second wife “Eppie” and his three daughters Jeane, Joan and Joyce.  His occupation from 1933 until 1941 when he left Bordeaux was as a lumber salesman for Mumby Lumber and Shingle Company.

Sources used:

History of the Northern Pacific Prairie Line

Wikipedia – Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad


Old Bordeaux Washington – Mumby, McIver, Costigan


Bordeaux Washington Mill Saws The Last Log In 1941



2010 Census: Keep A Copy For Your Descendants

1930 Yates family, Bordeaux, WA

Have you filled out your 2010 census and sent it back yet? If not, make sure you do, and be sure to make a copy for your records so your descendants can find it 72 years from now!  Granted, there’s not a lot of information they ask for in this census, but it’s still important to keep a copy of it.

Quick tip: I’m pretty sure it’s OK to add additional information where you can on the census you keep.  A little additional ‘gift’ for your descendants.

This was Logging in Washington State

Chuck Brodish recently contacted me about a 480 foot Douglas fir that was reportedly felled in the 1930’s in or near the Black Hills here in Washington. I wasn’t able to find the exact tree he was speaking of, but I do have a book I inherited from my parents entitled “This was Logging” by Ralph W. Andrews.

In looking at the photos in the book I saw references to many large fir trees (among other species cited) but not the particular tree he was asking about.  If anyone else is interested in the old logging practices here in the Pacific Northwest this book is a great resource.

MyFamily Confusion With Old And New Sites

MyFamily button

Years ago, when I first subscribed to Ancestry, they had free MyFamily sites. I had two of them in those days: Yates and Allied Families, and Wilkerson and Allied Families.  I happily added tons of census records, photos, and any other sundry that pertained to our history.

Then, MyFamily decided this was a pretty lucrative deal and they began charging for what initially had been free.  Their sweetened offer now though was more storage space, so I signed on at $29.95 a year for both sites. Generous family members chipped in, and we continued on for a few more years.  This seemed like a good way to create a ‘repository’ of sorts for each group’s records. More than once my cousins and Jim’s were able to recover pictures when their computer’s failed them.

Skip ahead to present day. I had let my subscriptions lapse when I knew that our income would be tighter after Jim retired. The sites were still there, but ‘dormant’. Recently, since I had some new information and contacts, I created a new site named Old Bordeaux Washington in tribute to the little logging town in which my parents had grown up.  As a paid site, it has its own site address, making it much easier to find.

Admittedly, I’m not the sharpest knife in the bulb drawer, but it is is almost infuriatingly complicated to have TWO MyFamily ‘generation’ choices:

MyFamily choices

Even if I have paid and free sites, and old and new ones, I would just like to be able to universally login to them all! Is that too much to ask? No, but in order to do so I have to migrate my old sites to the new format. Granted, not impossible, but definitely tiresome. Oh, and I have to admit, I am just a teensy bit scared of doing it because I’m afraid if I try it I’ll lose all the info on the old sites.  Whoever said doing genealogy was easy?

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