February 11, 2016

Use SideKin™ Instead of Niblings

I’ve been doing genealogy for over 25 years, and yet it was only recently that I was made aware of the term “nibling” in reference to the members of the family such as aunts/uncles, nieces/nephews.  I understand the intent of nibling, to be suggestive somewhat like ‘sibling’. But, I have a better term…

SideKin™ – “In genealogy, those relatives considered to be your aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews. “

Today, I coined my own word to describe those family members, and I think it is a more descriptive word that denotes direction and association: SIDEKIN™. It doesn’t have to be all in CAPS as it is here, that’s just for emphasis. I suggested it to a few genealogy friends on Facebook today and it got some favorable responses. I hope it catches on. So, what do you think? Is sidekin™ here to stay? If it does, you can say you heard about it here first.

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Social Genealogy: The Mistakes You Made That Sent Potential Cousins Away

Social Genealogy: The Mistakes You Made That Sent Potential Cousins Away…And How You Can Fix Them

One Administrator, Many Trees

As genealogy and DNA sharing has evolved, there is still one very important rule to follow: Whether you’re sending a message to someone who administers another tree in Ancestry, or you’ve seen a thread in Roots web surname or location lists, or, you think you have a close cousin connection in any of the various DNA testing sites like 23andMe or others, the one thing you can do to further your research easily and quickly is to BE SPECIFIC when you contact them.

Periodically, I’ll get a message from someone who has been looking at the 23andMe site where I am the administrator for three different people: myself, my brother and my husband. Most of the time, I can determine which genome they want to connect with because I recognize a surname or they actually TELL ME which one they were looking at.

What should you include in your communication with a potential cousin? Here’s some ideas.

  • The name of the tree, or specific person’s name for a genome. For instance, you want to connect with me and were in my Yates (1) tree. Please note that specific criteria.
  • Are you looking at a genome? Was it Dave ____, Carol ___ or Jim___?
  • Are you replying to a thread about a surname? Please include a first name of your ancestor with that surname if you have one. Include any dates or locations as well. This would hold true as well for inquiries about a location.
  • Are you sending an email? Please don’t put “genealogy” or “family” in the subject line. That means nothing to anyone and will likely get deleted. Instead, have it read something like, “Re: Joe Black, 1812, TN”. (I have three Smith lines, hence the request for a first name when contacting me).
  • Tip: If you choose not to include your email address in the body of the email, but still want to share it with your recipient, just write it as webducky AT (instead of the @ symbol) gmail.com. People are more apt to reply via email than through the website’s message feature. Including your full email address online is a sure way to ‘invite’ email scrapers to send you spam.
  • Tip 2: Follow the rule of WHO, WHY, WHAT, WHEN WHERE.

The bottom line here is, you need to provide the most information to your recipient to ensure your success.

Be courteous and forgive someone if they don’t reply right away. You don’t know what’s going on in their lives. Genealogy and genome sharing is fun and helps to share a clue to ‘who am I’? for everyone involved.

Thanks for reading. Have a comment or suggestion for this topic? Please do! Interested in what your DNA says about you? Feel free to click the 23andMe graphic in the sidebar.

© Carol Wilkerson – 2015 All rights reserved.

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HONORING OUR NATIVE AMERICANS – AUTHENTIC NAME MAPS BY AARON CARAPELLA

Native American Nations map

I have to admit, I’m still in awe of these Tribal Nations Maps created by Aaron Carapella. It was certainly a labor of love on his part as he set out to educate us all regarding the traditional and Native American names for themselves, and the locations where the tribes lived.

It was long ago, when I first read the Clan of the Cave Bear series of books, that I had sort of an epiphany about how I was seeing Native Americans through the eyes of modern cinema, books, and adulterated history fed to us so that we would think of Indians as “wild” or uncivilized. In my opinion you need to really see them all as ‘first peoples’ who came to North America as early as 16 thousand years ago. We’re still learning, still discovering the migration patterns of these ancient ancestors and it’s important to honor them for their survival skills, their understanding of the power of our planet and stop stereotyping them in our consciousness.

I’m still learning, and Aaron’s Tribal Nations maps can help us all see the real history of Native Americans.

NOVEMBER IS NATIVE AMERICAN MONTH – US, Mexico and Canada Tribal maps (24×36) are only $20 ! Use code: 20deal at checkout ! For 30% off on all other maps, use 30off
One shipping charge no matter how many maps you buy!

 

Not an affiliate or compensated post