August 30, 2015

Throw Back Thursday – When Greg Worked As A Deckhand

foot ferry, kitsap sun,

foot ferry, kitsap sun,

I [Greg Wilkerson] worked on this vessel as a deckhand in ’88/’89 when it was the passenger ferry that did the early runs to PSNS from the downtown Port Orchard, WA dock. Occasionally, I would work on the Retsil and Thurow as well. I also got to work on the Spirit of ’76 and every once in a while the Eagle. Each one was so different and special in their own ways. And each Captain I worked with while I was there was as unique as their favored vessel.

I learned a lot in those brief years working rain or rain (joking). Scraping rust, sanding, painting and washing just to do it all over again. In hindsight it seems so strange that there I was, as a 14-16 year old, riding my bike down to the dock and checking all the fluids (oil, coolant, fuel) and starting up the engines so they could warm up for the 1st run of the day and being responsible for the safety of the passengers while we were underway; and the counting and tallying of the fares, then going to school and then after school going back down and doing it again for the return passengers from the shipyard. I was very fortunate to have this opportunity and often look back on the experience and smile.

Our son Greg wrote this last November 2014 after I sent him an article about the Carlisle II that was in the Kitsap Sun (our local paper). He is now in his 40’s and has a son that is 15, the same age he was when he began working as a deckhand. That was his first real job and he matured (seemingly) overnight. A tall, thin young boy that he was when be began the job, he left it when we moved to Florida because Jim’s job took us there.

Greg the surfer 1991 FL

Greg in Florida 1991

He was exposed to the co-workers of his dad where Jim worked at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and saw them go into work each day ready to put in another shift, and took their fares as they went home tired each night. Most likely, in Greg’s eyes, he was “one of them”. Greg met friendly people, enthusiastic tourists, and became the personable guy he is today.

View of the U.S. Navy Puget Sound Naval Shipya...

View of the U.S. Navy Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washionton (USA), in 1913 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Ships at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, ...

English: Ships at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, seen from Port Orchard across the harbor. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: BREMERTON, Wash. (April 5, 2010) Work...

English: BREMERTON, Wash. (April 5, 2010) Workers at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility hold their TIP passes as they wait for transportation. The shipyard and maintenance facility Transportation Incentive Program, or TIP, has been recognized by the Washington State Department of Transportation for their commuter program, which along with the worker/driver program is a well-established alternative to driving to work every day. (U.S. Navy photo/Released) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Wordless Wednesday – Surfers In The Family

K

 First came the father. Boogie board, blond hair and sporting that 1991 surfer look on Amelia Island, Florida.

Greg the surfer 1991 FL

It must be something in the genes. Here’s his daughter in 2012, all the way on the other coast in California, looking just as tan and lithe as her father decades before.

K

Lazy Sunday Genealogy Links – Genealogy By The States

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I saw this on Thomas MacEntee’s blog Geneabloggers and wanted to share the link to the original blog posting at Hidden Genealogy Nuggets. It is a series of blog post prompts begun in January of 2013 by Jim Sanders. The prompts follow the 50 states and territories by their dates of admission to the country. Here is the full gist of the prompt:

This year I thought I’d offer my readers a weekly blogging prompt. Each week the blog post will focus on a particular state. The post can be about a particular individual or family who lived in or was connected in some way to that state. Sometimes there will not be a personal connection to the state. In this case find a genealogy resource for that state to talk about and highlight instead. Follow along with this series and post to your own site. If you choose to follow along, please link to (http://www.hiddengenealogynuggets.com) or mention the Hidden Genealogy Nuggets website.

 

52 Weeks of Personal Genealogy & History – Water

Port Orchard

Water, Water Everywhere

It seems like I’ve been around water in some form almost all my life.  The above picture is of the Port Orchard, Washington marina where were currently live.  But I was born in Olympia, WA which is surrounded by water sources of many kinds: It’s located on Budd Inlet; the Deshutes River flows into the inlet from mountain snows in the Cascades.

The west side of Washington state is the ‘rainy’ side of the Cascades, while to our west is the Olympic Mountains with it’s famous rain forest. It’s not a  tropical rain forest that you would naturally think of, but a temperate one with giant firs, native maples, and ferns that grow on the side of trees.  There’s even a blue glacier up there!

My parents lived in a small logging town south of Olympia from 1926-1941 and their lives were surrounded by water there too. Nearby were lakes such as Black Lake and Deep Lake, and “cricks” and small rivers like the Black, the Cedar, Waddell.

In my article Car Camping—50’s Style I describe our trips to Waddell Crick/Creek and all the fun we had getting muddy, wet and enjoying food in the great outdoors.   The article is on my older blog Pentimento if you have time to read it.

Florida Beaches & Rivers, and The Mississippi at Clinton

That’s not the extent of my adventures with “water” though.  When I left home after getting married in 1970 we visited for a short time in Jim’s home town of Clinton, Iowa.  Clinton is right smack dab on the Mississippi River and is the eastern most point in the state.  I remember the night we drove up on the levee to see the river and having ( Bye Bye) American Pie playing in my head. Oh, and we were in a ’57 Chevy too. :)

I don’t remember being around water when we were in Germany, other than knowing the Rhine River was not too far away.  We came back to Iowa in 1972 and for eight years I got to know the Mississippi in all it’s incarnations: at flood stage, frozen over, brown and dirty, and full of nice cat fish.  Our travels brought us to Port Orchard again in 1980 (just after the volcano blew!) and we lived here until we migrated again, this time to Amelia Island in Florida.

Amelia Island is located at the northeastern most point of Florida and a barrier island with the St. John River flowing between the island and the mainland.  In order to get to the island you only cross and bridge at either end to go over the river.  North of Jacksonville, Amelia Island is a beautiful location, but it does get some cooler weather, unlike further south into the state.

The Pacific Ocean

I think I love the ocean here the best. Yes, Washington does have rocky beaches, with lots of driftwood and is prone to wild storms on occasion too. All during my childhood we made multiple trips to places like Moclips (where my uncle Lem and aunt Della Yates lived), Copalis, and Pacific Beach to dig clams or just to visit and enjoy the sound of the surf and play in the sun.  If we went with friends we’d run all over the beach (within sight of our parents), splash through the tidepools and hunker down behind the windbreaks Dad and his friend Al would build back near the rocks.

A Visit To Old Bordeaux

Thank  you to Amy Coffin at WeTree and Thomas MacEntee at GeneaBloggers for making this meme possible!

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