November 26, 2014

Using Dry Ice To Clean Can Be A Blast

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I’m always amazed at the creativity of my fellow humans. When one way won’t work, or is harmful when it’s used, they are brilliant at coming up with a solution that can be inexpensive and eco-friendly. Such is the case when using dry ice blasting methods. Did you know that there are companies that make [dry ice blasting equipment rental] available?

I know what you’re thinking, where can you use such a method? It’s really quite common to see it used in the building and remodeling industry. I’ve even see it used on houses that were eliminating mold from attics and other rooms where it has been found. One episode I watched was of an attic and the operator used a nozzle (many are available, depending on their required use) to quickly and easily remove the black mold that was built up on the sheathing because of inadequate ventilation in the eaves and roof vents.

It was amazing to watch the black mold just disappear and there was no major clean up involved. The dry ice material evaporates and only a small amount of the debris cleaned off the soiled surface is left to vacuum up if necessary. It can be used on coatings such as adhesives, varnish, oil, grease, coal dust, soot, mold release agents and bitumen. As I said, the dry ice material is not left over and there is no detergent type residue either. Industries that necessitate a high degree of hygiene such as the food and pharmaceutical industries will find it very suitable.

Before you begin your next cleaning project you might look into a dry ice blasting rental as an environmentally safe way to go. Operators are not exposed to any toxic materials or fumes, and polluted run-off water is completely avoided.

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Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories – Religious Services

1821 Steele Street 1950's



 

The Will and Josie Yates House – Olympia, Washington

My family, except for my Grandma Josie, were not the church going type.  In fact, I don’t think I ever attended a church service of any kind with either of my parents.  I did love to spend the night with my Yates grandparents on Christmas Eve though, and early in the morning on Christmas Day Grandma and I would walk down to the church nearby to their holiday services.  If the weather was bad Grandpa probably drove us down there and picked us up. Grandpa never went to church with us either.

I don’t know how Grandma accomplished it, but after we got home from church she would change her clothes, put on her ever present apron and tackle the cooking of Christmas dinner. I think the Christmas spirit she received at the church services had a lot to do with it.

The turkey had been prepared and put in the oven early that morning as a combined effort by both Grandma and Grandpa. I remember one year Grandma forgot to turn on the oven and dinner was a little “late”.  Even though I didn’t do any of the cooking, I did the little things I knew would make Grandma happy, like dusting under the dining room table, getting out the china and silver and setting that table, and unearthing her “special” dishes from the cupboard she liked to use as serving pieces.

One I especially loved was the footed crystal dish she used to for cranberry sauce.  We always had olives and pickles (and Grandma would sneak a drink of the olive juice :::ick:::) and she would make yeast rolls from scratch.  The table cloth was always a white linen damask which of course would invariably get something spilled on it like gravy or cranberries.

Before we would begin eating, either Grandpa or Grandpa would say the blessing, thanking God for the wonderfully cooked meal, the bounty that was before us, and for those who were there to celebrate the day.

I think the funniest ‘tradition’ we had during Christmas dinner was when we would be in the full throes of eating and Grandpa would reach under the table to his left and pinch Grandma’s knee.  She’d give out a loud squeal and say, “Oh Daddy!” and then giggle till she lost her breath. Grandpa thought it was great fun, and obviously it was memorable for Dave and I too.

I’m participating in the Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories 2010 sponsored by Thomas MacEntee of GeneaBloggers fame.  Won’t you join us as we blog about our memories through the month of December?

You might also like to read:

Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories 2010: The Tree

Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories 2010 – Holiday Foods

Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories 2010 – Christmas Cards

Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories: Outdoor Decorations

Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories – Santa Claus

Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories – Fruitcake

Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories – Stockings and Shopping



Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories – Fruitcake

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If you live near someone long enough, eventually you will share recipes. It’s just part of being neighbors and I’m happy to say that’s what’s happened to be throughout my married life.  My mother never made fruitcake and as far as I know, none of my family exchanged them either.

Way back in the mid 1970’s we lived in Clinton, Iowa and our neighbors were Hazel and Carman Eckman.  Hazel was always baking cookies, cakes and desserts of some kind. I’d go over and have coffee with her some days and so I got the benefit of sharing the fruits of her labors.

A recipe Hazel gave me was for Unbaked Fruitcake. It sounds funny, but it tasted pretty good! (There’s nothing in it to harm you if it’s not baked)


No Bake Fruitcake

1 qt. chopped shelled pecans             1 box seedless raisins

1 – 10 oz bottle of marchino cherries, drained

1 C. evaporated milk          1/2 pound vanilla wafers

1/2 pound graham crackers

Combine all ingredients and press with spoon into an 8 X 8 inch pan lined with wax paper. Chill until set. Serves 4

I’m participating in the Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories 2010 sponsored by Thomas MacEntee of GeneaBloggers fame.  Won’t you join us as we blog about our memories through the month of December?

You might also like to read:

Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories 2010: The Tree

Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories 2010 – Holiday Foods

Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories 2010 – Christmas Cards

Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories: Outdoor Decorations

Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories – Santa Claus

Amazing Books App For Kids On The Go

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Amazing Books™ Application

Parents are always looking for something to keep the kids entertained in the car or on the plane.  Amazing Books is a digital popup book app for your children’s iPhone, iPad, or iPod and available for download now at iTunes.

Stories include The Three Little Pigs, Jack and the Beanstalk, and My First Trip to Washington, DC.  These entertaining children’s iPhone app s even have a feature where you can view the story in 3D! (You can purchase the glasses at Amazon).

If your household has an iPad instead you can opt to add the children’s iPad app instead.

What if you’re a grandparent with an iPod? …yes, there’s the children’s iPod app too.

For more detailed information regarding the books, click on any of the links included and download your books today.  Let’s make traveling more fun!

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