November 28, 2014

Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories 2010 – Food

Yates and Wilkerson families Nov 1973p

I realize that this isn’t exactly a Christmas photo, but it does show the house and room I remember best when it comes to Christmas.  Too bad no one thought to close the blinds so the flash didn’t look like the mother ship was landing in Grandma and Grandpa’s back yard!

That’s our son Greg sitting on his great grandpa Will Yates’ lap, with his cousin Eric Yates standing beside them.  You will probably deduce correctly that two different people took the pictures.  Dad took the one on the left, and Dave took the one on the right.

We were probably through with supper, and Grandma (with her apron still on) was finally sitting down to rest for a few minutes.  My brother Dave and I were having pumpkin pie, and if you look closely in the picture to the right you will see me being rude silly. The pictures would look pretty American Gothic-ish if it wasn’t for me and the mouth wide open and full of whipped cream. :D

I’m participating in the Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories 2010 sponsored by Thomas MacEntee of GeneaBloggers fame.  Won’t you join us as we blog about our memories through the month of December?

You might also like to read:

Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories 2010: The Tree

Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories 2010: The Tree

charliebrowntree

 

 

 

Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories 2010: The Tree

While others in the United States might have had a challenge in finding a Christmas tree, forced to buy them from lots, we were very fortunate to live here in Washington State where Douglas firs were very easy to come by.

We lived at the end of Dennis Street in Tumwater, and up until 1965 we had no houses anywhere near us. We were surrounded by a huge acreage that most likely had been a family farm at one time. The fields around us were cleared and I don’t even remember any tree stumps to speak of. Far behind us were some woods and it could have been from those trees, or the large firs to our west, where the seeds for the small Christmas-size trees in the fields were blown into the sandy loess soil waiting for us to harvest one each December.  I like to think of it as the Old Fuzzy Top effect.

Mom always called it “pestering” when my brother Dave and I would begin our annual campaign with the question, “When can we put up the tree?” No doubt, we didn’t really want the tree to go up so much as we wanted it to be there so we could have presents underneath it! Oh sure, we liked decorating our little tree (not quite Charlie Brown-ish, but sometimes small-ish in size) for the most part.

I think we had some commercial ornaments, and we’d always wind a string of lights or two around through the boughs, but we also had some hand crafted by Yates children artisans these aluminum foil decorated milk bottle caps too.  We’d beg Mom and Dad each year to buy a new package of silver tinsel and we had strict instructions to put it on one piece at a time.  As soon as Mom left the room we’d revert to rebellious heathens and toss it on the tree with wild abandon.  Hey, it looked artistic to us.

The tree was positioned in front of the living room window that faced east so that anyone coming up the road would see the lights at night and take notice of our earnest attempt to show our holiday spirit.  Our little tree was saying, “Hey, look at us, we have a tree too!”.

I’m participating in the Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories 2010 sponsored by Thomas MacEntee of GeneaBloggers fame.  Won’t you join us as we blog about our memories through the month of December?

Voting Ends For Your Favorite Genealogy Blog and Advent Calendar Begins

Events arrows

 

 

 

Nominate A Blog

Just a little reminder that the voting is ending today for your favorite genealogy blog for Family Tree Magazine’s 40 Best Genealogy Blogs for 2011.  (Yes, I am nominated! :) ) As you can see in the sidebar to the immediate right I have a quick and easy link to the nomination page, or you can use the link above.

 

Tell Us Your Christmas Memories

And, starting tomorrow is the fun of the Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories.  I have my first post done and ready to go. Come join us and tell us all about your Christmas memories, won’t you?

Our Ancestor’s Moving Experiences

While we were on our vacation to California we stopped in Oroville to visit my aunt and uncle and do a little sight-seeing. We did the former, but not the latter. One of the places I would have liked to have seen was the Pioneer History Museum but we ran out of time in the two days we were there.

We really wanted to see the museum because Jim’s great-great grandfather Joshua Wilkerson was one of the 1849 miners who came to that area and found gold.  We really always wish we could find a picture of him as a young man, but finding that would be like finding gold wouldn’t it? :)

Even though we missed that destination, as we rode along those thousands of miles I began thinking of just how our ancestors moved all their things for those same distances.  I know, we all think of those pioneers on the Oregon Trail and how they had to dump some of their precious belongings along the trail, but what about later, before moving boxes and supplies in our present era?

I know people had trunks and probably wooden boxes to safeguard their treasures, but it might surprise you to know that cardboard boxes came into their own as early as 1874, when G. Smyth built the first single sided corrugated board-making machine. Also in 1874, Oliver Long improved upon the Jones patent and invented a lined corrugated cardboard.

While it may have been some time before cardboard boxes were widely used, it’s intriguing that the invention has been around for that long, isn’t it? Do you own any old trunks or boxes from earlier times?

Source:

History of Papermaking

The invention of paper and the history of papermaking machinery.

By , About.com Guide

© 2007-2014 iPentimento|Genealogy and History All Rights Reserved -- Copyright notice by Blog Copyright