October 25, 2016

My Favorite Fork


Fave fork corners

For whatever reason, my mom and dad used their wedding silver and china when we were kids. I don’t know if they just didn’t have the money to go out and buy inexpensive dinnerware, but all I can remember was using that, or dishes that came from a gas station or out of a box of laundry soap.

As you know, silver service of the expensive kind was quite heavy and unwieldy which meant that it was a big juggling session for me whenever I would eat. My mom finally had an epiphany and brought home my new fork which you see here. It’s probably a well-known pattern to many, but to me it was from then on “my favorite fork”. It was mine and I was, from then on, the master of my own food consumption (other than cooking it) and this little salad fork is still in my silverware drawer and used quite often. Because I can.

Apparently, it’s called Everglo and I found a listing for it on Replacements. Google to the rescue again!

Replacements photo fork

How To Change Your Admin User Name NOW!

robot I know I’ve been talking about this a lot lately, but none of us want to have our blogs infected by hackers using brute force tactics to get into our files through using the default “Admin” login name. This should be one of the first things you change when you begin your blog.

Source: These are directions Website Defender gives in order to change your Admin name.

  1. Login into your WordPress admin panel using your admin account.
  2. Select the ”users” area from your dashboard panel, and click on “Add New User”.
  3. Fill in the form and choose ”administrator” in the ”Role” drop down menu (remember to enter a strong web password and also check the password strength indicator to confirm that your new password is strong enough).
  4. When finished, click on ”Add New User”.
  5. Log in again using your new WordPress admin username.
  6. Navigate to the ”Users” area.
  7. From the users list check the box of the previous “admin” username and select ”Delete” from the drop-down menu.
  8. Next, you will be asked about the articles posted under the the previous ”admin” username. Select the option “attribute all posts and links to:” and select your new administrator password. When ready click “Confirm Deletion”.
  9. Make sure that the “display name” of your admin user is different from the username, especially if the admin user posts any blog articles. If the actual username is used also as ”display name” of the writer, a hacker can easily identify the admin username and target the account.

Say “I Love You Mom” With A Gift On Canvas – Offer Ends May 12

60% off Entire Site + Free Standard Shipping through 5/12

I just got word about this today. Easy Canvas Prints will be lowering prices on their entire site for a limited time before Mother’s Day*.

*Mother’s Day is May 12th!!

Happy Mother’s Day To All My Readers!

The Evolution of Handwriting: Tools

From Twigs to Keyboards

There is a current discussion in the genealogy circles, as well as in general circles, about the demise of cursive writing. Forgive me if I don’t have my mind completely wrapped around this, but I think it’s interesting to discuss and mull over the evolution of handwriting in general. I take a personal interest in this topic because I am able to analyze cursive handwriting.

No doubt someone has done a paper on this, but I don’t want to get all scientific and deep about it. Here’s the gist of my thinking on the subject. Handwriting is brain writing. That said, does it follow that the human mind has evolved along with the tools we have available to us? From the most simple of communication using writing I’m guessing it would be cuneiform which would be more printing than any kind of cursive. Using cuneiform would have been fairly uniform with little or no attempt to personalize it with much success.

Moving forward then, let’s consider penmanship as we know if from the last few hundred years. During the Victorian and Edwardian ages cursive was much more flamboyant, which if you consider that time, humans had more spare time and the availability of better clothing, etc. Naturally this era of spreading one’s wings intellectually would have brought about the loops and curls of handwriting that would have indicated the person was well-educated and worldly with a certain style and flair.

Jumping ahead again, during the 1900’s handwriting evolved again, going from the flamboyant to the more “conformative” methods such as Spenserian and the Palmer type. Most likely, this was because it was being used in the business world and would have given businesses an advantage in that any communication they conveyed was universally readable and understood.

If handwriting was brain writing then how were these changes affecting the human mind. Even if you don’t understand handwriting analysis, the change in handwriting still has some effect. As English writing humans progressed it shows the coming out of the era of upper and lower classes. Lower classes had no time or opportunity to even learn to read and write.

We went from an agrarian society and into the industrial age. The upper classes might have held on to their writing for a while, but change was in the air for everyone and expediency became the driving force of society. Faster was the key to making more money and prosperity. No time for fancy writing, we needed to get our points across and so, little by little even our lower grade school children who were taught cursive writing all through the 20th century slowly were weaned off cursive and “graduated” more and more to typewriter keyboards, and even now to computer and personal devices.

Do We Still Need Cursive Writing?

In my opinion, we will always need to have a form of communication that only depends on our mind and some way to share our thoughts. We can’t put all of our communication gifts all in one basket if, for no other reason than we have no idea what the future might bring. What if electronic devices suddenly went away? How would we communicate?

Brain Writing

Before I began my courses in handwriting analysis I had some incorrect assumptions about my fellow humans and what their handwriting might be telling me/us. What you might think is ‘sloppy’ handwriting could very well include indicators of a sharp and incisive mind (V like lines), with the ability to concentrate (uniform writing size and depth), and various indicators of the ability to speak intelligently to share those ideas (how they make their rounded letters and if they are open or closed).

Conversely, the people who have retained their somewhat flamboyant writing with big rounded letters and looping curves might just be unable to concentrate, superficial and even selfish.

For now, at least, the electronic age is here to stay. If we are no longer writing in cursive, how are our minds working if we are still brain writing? It does involve the brain even if we type on keyboards as I am doing right now. I think we are using more of both side of our brains for one thing. Our creativity might extend to more “coded” thinking as more and more of us learn to write computer code. Will we be able to analyze the person just by keystrokes and words used in the text?

We won’t be able to analyze handwriting though if too many people lose that skill entirely. Do you think we should still teach cursive writing to all school children? What’s your opinion?

52 Weeks To Better Genealogy – Challenge #29 – Handwriting

With the holidays upon us….the article below might be handy as you visit with family.

How To Do A Genealogical Interview




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