October 10, 2015

YATES and WILKERSON Direct Line Surnames Being Researched

iPentimento 150

Mine and Jim’s direct line surnames. Yes, this is cousin bait, but of the most honorable kind.

Bean, Boyert, Cook, DeSpain, Haga, Harmes, Horst, Jordan, McCoy, Miller, Otto, Perkins, Ripley, Skaggs, Wilkerson, Whitmore

Branch: YATES
Ball, Bailey, Breedlove, Chance, Crawford, Dawson, Harrison, Hedgepeth, Holmes, Johansson, Kelsey, Larsson, Moline, Nordgren, Osgathorpe, Pentecost, Pledge, Poindexter, Reddin, Register, Smith, Speer/Speers/Spears, Steelman, Wright, Yates

Carol’s Pedigree Tree


My Favorite Fork


Fave fork corners

For whatever reason, my mom and dad used their wedding silver and china when we were kids. I don’t know if they just didn’t have the money to go out and buy inexpensive dinnerware, but all I can remember was using that, or dishes that came from a gas station or out of a box of laundry soap.

As you know, silver service of the expensive kind was quite heavy and unwieldy which meant that it was a big juggling session for me whenever I would eat. My mom finally had an epiphany and brought home my new fork which you see here. It’s probably a well-known pattern to many, but to me it was from then on “my favorite fork”. It was mine and I was, from then on, the master of my own food consumption (other than cooking it) and this little salad fork is still in my silverware drawer and used quite often. Because I can.

Apparently, it’s called Everglo and I found a listing for it on Replacements. Google to the rescue again!

Replacements photo fork

Throw Back Thursday – When Greg Worked As A Deckhand

foot ferry, kitsap sun,

I [Greg Wilkerson] worked on this vessel as a deckhand in ’88/’89 when it was the passenger ferry that did the early runs to PSNS from the downtown Port Orchard, WA dock. Occasionally, I would work on the Retsil and Thurow as well. I also got to work on the Spirit of ’76 and every once in a while the Eagle. Each one was so different and special in their own ways. And each Captain I worked with while I was there was as unique as their favored vessel.

I learned a lot in those brief years working rain or rain (joking). Scraping rust, sanding, painting and washing just to do it all over again. In hindsight it seems so strange that there I was, as a 14-16 year old, riding my bike down to the dock and checking all the fluids (oil, coolant, fuel) and starting up the engines so they could warm up for the 1st run of the day and being responsible for the safety of the passengers while we were underway; and the counting and tallying of the fares, then going to school and then after school going back down and doing it again for the return passengers from the shipyard. I was very fortunate to have this opportunity and often look back on the experience and smile.

Our son Greg wrote this last November 2014 after I sent him an article about the Carlisle II that was in the Kitsap Sun (our local paper). He is now in his 40’s and has a son that is 15, the same age he was when he began working as a deckhand. That was his first real job and he matured (seemingly) overnight. A tall, thin young boy that he was when be began the job, he left it when we moved to Florida because Jim’s job took us there.

Greg the surfer 1991 FL

Greg in Florida 1991

He was exposed to the co-workers of his dad where Jim worked at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and saw them go into work each day ready to put in another shift, and took their fares as they went home tired each night. Most likely, in Greg’s eyes, he was “one of them”. Greg met friendly people, enthusiastic tourists, and became the personable guy he is today.

View of the U.S. Navy Puget Sound Naval Shipya...

View of the U.S. Navy Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washionton (USA), in 1913 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Ships at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, ...

English: Ships at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, seen from Port Orchard across the harbor. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: BREMERTON, Wash. (April 5, 2010) Work...

English: BREMERTON, Wash. (April 5, 2010) Workers at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility hold their TIP passes as they wait for transportation. The shipyard and maintenance facility Transportation Incentive Program, or TIP, has been recognized by the Washington State Department of Transportation for their commuter program, which along with the worker/driver program is a well-established alternative to driving to work every day. (U.S. Navy photo/Released) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


It was important to me to have my DNA tested now so it was “banked” and might be a source of future studies for my health. Today, I read an article that poses the question, “Is Fibromyalgia A Mitochondrial Disorder?“. I maintain that I have had fibromyalgia all of my life. I may not have always known it, but I felt the effects when I was very young and they have never ever gone away.

While I understand  :-( the reasoning behind the FDA limiting the health results of those of us who have taken the 23andMe DNA tests (my brother has also taken the tests to fully round out our DNA profiles) but it infuriates me a bit that I may have a medical breakthrough in my reach, but not in my grasp. I won’t go into the money and lawsuits part of it all, but suffice it to say that’s probably what drives the reasoning behind it.

I invite any of my genealogy/DNA savvy friends to weigh in and leave their thoughts.

My 23andMe Results Are In! I\’m Pleasantly Surprised!


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