December 17, 2014

My 23andMe Results Are In! I’m Pleasantly Surprised!

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My results are in and my surprise is that I have a tiny bit of Asian/Native American blood, as well as a super big amount of Scandinavian. No surprise on that second part, with my mom’s Swedish line, but I had always wondered whether anything else would show up.

I used 23andMe as my genetic testing service because we had used them for my husband’s line and we were very happy that his results confirmed he has some degree of Native American blood as well. Actually, we had his dad tested, which presented a much more direct line.

Back to my test results, this is what 23andMe has to say about my testing:

Ancestry Composition tells you what percent of your DNA comes from each of 31 populations worldwide. The analysis includes DNA you received from all of your ancestors, on both sides of your family. The results reflect where your ancestors lived 500 years ago, before ocean-crossing ships and airplanes came on the scene.

I have to say, I was quite surprised by the “Yakut” listing, but it might all tie in with the Native American migration in some way, which I suspect. To be honest, I’m not sure just where my Native American genes might have come from, but I suspect it could have been through my Poindexter family, or my Smith line. Family stories are great for pointing you in certain directions, and in ours they made references to “black indians” and “red indians”. So far, I haven’t found anyone in the family that was an enrolled member of a tribe.

The Poindexter Connection

What have you found in your DNA testing results that surprised you? Was there anything, or was it as you thought it would be? In the past I have used other DNA testing services, but honestly, I think 23andMe is the best when it comes to detailed results. What I like about them too is that they keep refining the results over time so you get an even more clear picture of your genetic lineage.

23andMe Ancestry Composition for Carol PDF file

7+ Websites for Revolutionary War Research

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This is my first blog post using the Firefox addon Scribefire so it’s going to be abbreviated, but I wanted to tell you about an excellent article by Gena Philibert-Ortega that lists the Top 7 Websites for Revolutionary War Ancestors, plus one more suggestion from me as a resource.

My source is “ask your genealogy friends”. Sounds simple, but you never know who might have their own books on a topic. This link happens to go to Cyndi’s List which is always an excellent starting point for genealogical research.

 

Check This Chart Before You Add That Picture

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To Download, or Upload, That Is The Question

One of the things that really slows up my blog posts is trying to decide whether or not I’m committing some grievous sin against the Google gods by posting a photo. Well, maybe not Google gods, but photo owners and creators who might send out the creative commons jack-booted thugs to confiscate my files. Seriously, sometimes I just don’t know whether I’m in violation, but this week’s flow chart tells me (and now you) what to do before you post that JPG.

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How Windows 8.1 Changed My Online Life, But I Tweaked It

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Goodbye XP, Hello 8.1

As everyone probably knows, Windows XP bit the dust (as far as being supported) earlier this year, and for us it created all sorts of havoc and expenditures. I’m not complaining, it’s just part of life as we know it in the 21st century.

 

Without going into great detail, here are some of the things I had to do just to personalize our new computers. First, we bought a new laptop and I thought we both would be able to use it, but uh, that kind of didn’t work out if we both wanted to be on it at the same time. As it was, I was “learning” to use the new computer and 8.1 at the same time. Eventually, we opted for a second one, a desktop this time.

Netplwiz to the Rescue

I freely admit that I am not good with too much fancy windows stuff that W8 added. I know it’s to cater to the peeps who like swiping and all that, but I just like to KISS. First thing I did was fire up Google and search for a better way to auto login to Windows because I don’t want to type in a password each time. People who take their computers out into the business world should protect theirs, but it’s a pain to have to do it at home each day. By the way, I operate on the assumption that by the time I get around to learning something I am way behind, and Google has found hundreds of article on how to fix things. First thing I found was [no quotes] “netplwiz”. [FREE} Here’s how it works:

1. Click Start, type netplwiz, and then press Enter.
2. In the User Accounts dialog box, click the account you want to automatically log on to.If it is available, clear the Users Must Enter A User Name And Password To Use This Computer check box.
3. Click OK.
4. In the Automatically Log On dialog box, enter the user’s password twice and click OK.

Make sure you read this important article at About.com with tips for logging on using a Microsoft account. Having a MS account is handy because it stays in sync with multiple computers you may be using.

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Disabling Windows Swipe Screen and Charms With Classic Shell

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The other irritant I found tiresome was the swipe screen and the charms. I bet they’re a blessing on iPads, but not so much on a laptop with a touch screen. Having them on the desktop is a ditto. Once again, Google to the rescue with a short search that provided the solution. Classic Shell is another [FREE] program I found, and I love it! Please do take a look at their page, and like them on Facebook as well.  Of course, you can get the program for free, but if you find you really like it and it saves you headaches you can donate a few bucks.

 

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