September 2, 2015

How Do Cousins Get Removed Or Ignored

  • Quick post for my readers who get confused over what it means when someone tells you you’re X amount of times removed. Read this article from Ancestry that explains why and how it happens.
English: A chart illustrating the different ty...

English: A chart illustrating the different types of cousins, including genetic kinship marked within boxes in red which shows the actual genetic degree of relationship (gene share) with ‘self’ in percentage (%). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

DNA Cousins Are A Special Breed And It’s Harder To Determine A Surname Connection

I have three different DNA results on 23andMe for my brother, me and my husband Jim and my email address is used for cousin connection for all three. I’ve also uploaded our raw data to GedMatch that also includes a way to connect as well via email. Three results to maintain and cousins contacting me makes for a bit of confusion because…

  • They don’t consider that there might be one person maintaining multiple profiles for family members. [Include which person’s DNA profile you were looking at].
  • Their message is so cryptic and lacking in even the basic details like how they think there might be a connection. Just this week I got an email that said, “We’re cousins! Welcome to our ever growing family tree.” Huh? [At least try to add your main surnames so we can check our family tree index. I don’t have a memory of each of my thousands of surnames].
  • It doesn’t occur to them to further the possibility of proving a connection by also including their family tree on a site like Ancestry for comparison. [How can we connect if we don’t have any way to compare surnames? Let’s make it as easy as possible to do that.]

Make a small flow chart to post near your computer so you remember to include as much as you can in correspondence. Include as much personal information as you’re comfortable sharing (First and last name, email address where you can be contacted; a link to your tree where it can be viewed online; your website or blog address, etc.)

Source for Cousin Relationship chart “Defining Cousins.” Defining Cousins. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Feb. 2015.  Rootsweb/Ancestry

 

How Genealogists Can Spread The Love Of WDYTYA Goodness

WDYTYA-Banner-20101

WDYTYA-Banner

For all the seasons that Who Do You Think You Are have been on there’s almost always a love/hate discussion the next day in the Facebook genealogy community. At first, everyone was happy the show was on and promoting the interest in family history. Then, little by little the critques began. The complaints ranged from there being too much detail that made the stories drag on, to not enough content that showed how many hours it took to find the juicy details.

Of course, what some people failed to take into account was that the show is just an hour long commercial for Ancestry.com. There is certainly nothing wrong with that, but it should be understood by those of us who do all forms of research that by criticizing and nit picking the show each week we are doing more harm than good when it comes to promoting the fun of finding family history documentation. We’re darn lucky someone like Lisa Kudrow chose to promote genealogy by producing the programs.

The program has changed from a national station host to The Learning Channel that may or may not be as accessible. As time went by the format for the stories of each celebrity evolved to keep it interesting while staying within a set budget. I’m assuming all this, but I suspect it’s all true.  As has been said recently, many aspects of the episodes can be teaching opportunities for those of us who write about genealogical research. Not just teaching opportunities, but talking points as well.

Now, About Your Own Research

If each celebrity’s life leaves us with questions, that’s a good thing. We might find ourselves with new ideas for our own research. Avenues we haven’t thought of persuing like voter lists, criminal records, church histories, newspaper accounts, or even special censuses for states. Have you considered searching for a topic in Google books? Not just in Google itself, but in their books.

Even more ‘daring’…search for your ancestor by name in a general Google search of images. I’m not advocating just doing research online of course. Find out if your local library has a genealogy section. Maybe your local historical society has a few suggestions for you too. One more suggestion, ask your friends what kind of books they might have that you could use for research. Personally, I have a few genealogy books of my own and can do lookups in them if you ask nicely. 😉

Ancestry Throws A 15 Day Genealogy Feast Starting October 1


Ancestry.com 15th Anniversary Sweepstakes

Ready, Set, Search! 

Ancestry is celebrating 15 years of genealogy goodness with their 15 days of free access to selected databases on their site.  For my readers who’ve been waiting for a chance like this, it’s finally arrived!

Win Daily Prizes with Ancestry.com 15th Anniversary Sweepstakes

Beginning October1, 2011 and running through October 15th at midnight.

 Each day of the 15 days you’ll check the site to see which database is available, as well as what prize is being awarded that day.  (The first database is the Social Security Death Index; the first day prize is a 1 year Ancestry.com World Explorer Membership).

Fifteen Years:  The People Behind Ancestry’s Success

I’m looking forward to seeing all of the faces and stories of those who’ve helped to make Ancestry.com a success. First up? Lou Szucs who has been an employee since 1996.  Thank you Lou!

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