October 5, 2015

Questions For Interviewing Your Grandchildren


Clear and calm tropical dream beach (Hawaii)


In a couple months we’ll be going to California to visit our kids and grandkids. We haven’t seen them in person since 2007, but we do talk on the phone now and then.  One of the things I agonize about is we don’t really ‘know‘ our older grandkids as far as every day conversations are concerned.  As for the youngest, she is seventeen months old and we haven’t even met her yet.

I wonder about their hopes, dreams, values, etc., and today I found some questions that I might want to ask them.  I found them on The Legacy Project site so they’re not some I thought of personally.  Of course, anything would have to be age appropriate or applicable, but these can be modified or amended for my needs or yours.

I’ve saved them in a Word document so you can use them too. Enjoy!

Grandchild Interview

Finding Ancestors Using DAR Chapter Webpages

If you’re like me, I bet you try almost every way and means to find your ancestors. Voting records, tax records, newspaper subscription records, etc.,  but have you ever thought to look for your ancestors by checking DAR Chapter websites for them?

I will use my own Chapter website as a ‘for instance’. I live in Washington State, but the DAR Chapter I joined was in West Plains, Missouri. That probably seems a bit strange, but it happened that way because that is where my Grandmother Minnie Smith Yates was born and our cousins still live in Howell County even to this day. One of my older cousins wanted me to join there since she was helping me with documentation for my Patriot Capt. Thomas Poindexter. So, while I live in WA state, and I am an associate member of the local Elizabeth Ellington Chapter of the DAR of Bremerton, WA, my main Chapter is in Missouri for sentimental reasons.  I belong to the Ozark Spring Chapter of the DAR , and have since 1998.

With that explanation in mind, you might consider that other ladies have joined in much the same way. Not always of course, but it is something to consider as you look for connections. Keep in mind, not all DAR local Chapters have web pages, but more and more do, and it is worth looking for them on the main DAR webpage.  Currently, there are over approximately 3000 Chapters in the United States and abroad.

On the left sidebar of the National DAR site click on “become a member” and a drop down menu will appear; then click on Chapters at the bottom of that menu list. I have included a link to the state and local Chapters here also.  Once you have found a Chapter in the geographical area of where your ancestor lived, try checking their Patriot List for surnames that might sound familiar.  Below is a list from the Ozark Spring Chapter.

Patriot Ancestors:

Allison, Alexander NC Lawson, Randolph VA
Allison, William NC McMahan, William PA
Carpenter, Benjamin VT Morgan, Joseph MD
Coolbaugh, Moses PA Newberry, Samuel VA
Craig, David NC Norman, David SC
Dowden, Clementias PA Olinger, John C. VA
Gentry, Nicholas PA Pease, Abner (2nd Lt.) NY
Hardy, Phineas NH Poindexter, Thomas NC
Harrison, James NC Poppleton, Samuel NJ
Harmon, Charles VA Thomason/Thompson, John NC
Hensley, William VA Turner, James SC
Holbert, John NJ Walker, James CT
Howle, Alexander SC Walker, John NC
Howle, William GA Yadon, Jacob VA

As you can see, my own Thomas Poindexter is in this list, but I also see the name of another one of my ancestors, James Harrison. That gives me a clue that even though I’m not a member of this chapter through that particular Patriot, someone else is. In that case, I would go back and check the site map and find the contact information, click on it and send an email to them asking for more information.

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I hope this article has been thought-provoking and helpful to you. I am a proud member of the DAR.

My National Number is 0783288

(This is not an offical DAR recognized site.)

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Get Your Family History Book Ready For Christmas Now

I can tell you from experience, there is no point at which you will arrive and say, “I have finished my family tree”. That said, if you’ve been thinking of putting together a book to give to your family this Christmas, the time to get organized is now. Hold off on looking for “one more thing” and just resolve to make a book out of what you have now.

While this is an affiliate link ad, I am most sincere about getting your family tree into book form.  Ancestry’s Family History Books were not available when I wanted to publish my own family tree, so I had to do it myself. I did use the Family Tree Maker program’s book section to do it, but I still had to go to Kinkos and ended up with less than wonderful looking photo pages. If it wasn’t for all my cousins and immediate family paying for their books up front, it might never have gotten done.

Maybe you’re just beginning your genealogical research and wondering which program you should use to compile all that you find. Why not try the latest version of Family Tree Maker (2009). Ancestry has a super deal right now as you can see from the above ad. I am a subscriber to Ancestry Magazine and one year for free will be of tremendous help to you.

Rootsweb Gets A New Address


I suppose it was inevitable that when The Generations Network bought Rootsweb there would be some changes. It was announced today that there will be an address change for Rootsweb, but not a change in availability or affordability. It will still be free, which is very good news. If you are new to Rootsweb, its intent was that it would be by the people, and for the people, and it touted itself as the only free place on the web to find genealogical information.

As you can see from the comments on the link I included here, most seem to feel that this is the beginning of the end of Rootsweb as a free entity. We can only wait and see, I guess, but sad to say, it may be that once again greed will win out.

What will be different is that the Web address for all RootsWeb pages will change from www.rootsweb.com to www.rootsweb.ancestry.com.

  • Don’t forget the other enormously helpful (and still free) site USGenWeb is still available for your family history research needs too.

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