December 20, 2014

Re: Dark Roasted Blend: Ghost Towns of the Pacific Northwest: Bordeaux, Washington

Dark Roasted Blend: Ghost Towns of the Pacific Northwest: Bordeaux, Washington. I have an Google key word alert for the terms “Bordeaux Washington” and a link to the article above arrived in my email today. As I just wrote a post today about Blanch Philby’s untimely death in the town of Bordeaux, I thought this link with pictures of the town would also be of interest to my readers.

Many of the photos in their article originated at the University of Washington Library from their Photo Collection #516. I have seen many of them before, and of the personal snapshots taken by the author of the article I think our family has several of the same ilk.

My article is Death on the Tracks: 1903 Bordeaux Washington

Railroad Service From Bordeaux To Seattle Connected With Chicago, Milwaukee, St Paul and Pacific Line

NPPL rail map

Washington State Railroads and Lumber Mills

Today, I received an interesting vintage postcard from a new friend who had found it on Ebay.  Postmarked 10 May 1915, it was a confirmation from the Mumby Lumber and Shingle Company of Bordeaux, Washington sent to George F. Nilder (or Hilder), a representative of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad, informing him that his order CFL6540 was being loaded on P & R car No. 530.  This postcard was sent for a penny and was received 11 May 1915. Pretty good overnight service for 1915, huh?

You know, railroad cars from many lines sometimes ended up in places that you wouldn’t think were ‘normal’, but railroad cars are probably like rental cars or trucks we see today where they can be from any state in the union depending on their type or usage.  Lumber would likely be shipped all over the nation because of its ubiquitous usage.

My husband said that when he worked at Clinton Corn Company in Iowa that they would get grain and coal cars from other regions, but usually from the Midwest. But their cars that went out with corn in them were shipped country-wide.

  So, a lumber or shingle order was filled at Bordeaux, Washington into a Pennsylvania and Reading Railroad car and sent out to a larger connector railroad line there in Thurston County.  At this point I can only guess on which one, but it could have been the Northern Pacific Prairie Line.

There’s also no way to know if it stayed on that line all the way to Seattle, but most likely for expediency it wouldn’t have languished anywhere too long but delivered as soon as feasible to the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad yard so they could send it on its way and fulfill their order.

In 1915 my grandfather, Elvin B. Moline was age 22 and just beginning his career in the lumber business.  It wouldn’t be until 1933 that he would take up residence in the town of Bordeaux with his second wife “Eppie” and his three daughters Jeane, Joan and Joyce.  His occupation from 1933 until 1941 when he left Bordeaux was as a lumber salesman for Mumby Lumber and Shingle Company.

Sources used:

History of the Northern Pacific Prairie Line

Wikipedia – Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad

 

Old Bordeaux Washington – Mumby, McIver, Costigan

 

Bordeaux Washington Mill Saws The Last Log In 1941

 

 

Carnival of Genealogy – 57th Edition “I read it in the news!”

Technically, I didn’t read this article in the news since it happened about nine years before I was born, but it was in the Daily Olympian newspaper in 1941. As the caretaker of the family documents and pictures, this article was one of a few about our family that made the news.

Dad never “won” anything in his life before or after the draft. Lucky him, huh? [As it turns out, the date of July 19th is important in our Yates/Wilkerson family. My cousin Linda Yates was born on that day in 1950, and our granddaughter Katrina was born on that day in 2001. :) ]


William Gale Yates 1920-1996

In 1941 his draft registration number (169) was chosen as #1 in Thurston county, WA, and rather than be drafted, he joined the Navy. He went to basic training in San Diego and then was sent to Kaneohe Bay on Oahu after the Pearl Harbor attack. The unit was then divided by alphabet, and the first half was sent to serve on the Saratoga, and the second half was sent to New Caledonia in the Loyalty Islands.  During his time in the Navy, Gale was certified as a Seaman Second Class on the 23rd of Feb. 1942 and completed a course of study at Aviation Machinist’s Mates’ School at US Naval Air Station, Seattle, WA.

One of the ships he was transported on was the USS Dixie. During this time in the war, probably when he was in New Caledonia, View Larger Map Gale had occasion to strap “Ol’ Bull Halsey into his parachute”.  Dad always thought that was pretty cool. :) The plane in the article above I believe is an F4F Grumman Wildcat.

 

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Bordeaux Washington Mill Saws The Last Log In 1941

26-sept-1941-bordeaux-mill-closes

I have recently been going through some of my old newspapers and found another article about the last days of Bordeaux, WA. This one is from the Daily Olympian dated 26 Sept 1941. I scanned it so I could send it to my uncle in California who used to live in this logging town, but also for my readers so they can understand what happened when a mill town runs out of marketable logs.

Are you looking for more articles written by this blog about the old mill town of Bordeaux? You might want to do a search here using the Lijit search box to the right, or click on these previous stories. Thanks for visiting iPentimento today! :)

1904 Death on the Tracks in Bordeaux, Washington

A Personal History With Trains

A Visit To Old Bordeaux

Vintage Photos at Shadow Catchers Capture WA State History

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