December 21, 2014

MyFamily Confusion With Old And New Sites

MyFamily choices

MyFamily button

Years ago, when I first subscribed to Ancestry, they had free MyFamily sites. I had two of them in those days: Yates and Allied Families, and Wilkerson and Allied Families.  I happily added tons of census records, photos, and any other sundry that pertained to our history.

Then, MyFamily decided this was a pretty lucrative deal and they began charging for what initially had been free.  Their sweetened offer now though was more storage space, so I signed on at $29.95 a year for both sites. Generous family members chipped in, and we continued on for a few more years.  This seemed like a good way to create a ‘repository’ of sorts for each group’s records. More than once my cousins and Jim’s were able to recover pictures when their computer’s failed them.

Skip ahead to present day. I had let my subscriptions lapse when I knew that our income would be tighter after Jim retired. The sites were still there, but ‘dormant’. Recently, since I had some new information and contacts, I created a new site named Old Bordeaux Washington in tribute to the little logging town in which my parents had grown up.  As a paid site, it has its own site address, making it much easier to find.

Admittedly, I’m not the sharpest knife in the bulb drawer, but it is is almost infuriatingly complicated to have TWO MyFamily ‘generation’ choices:

MyFamily choices

Even if I have paid and free sites, and old and new ones, I would just like to be able to universally login to them all! Is that too much to ask? No, but in order to do so I have to migrate my old sites to the new format. Granted, not impossible, but definitely tiresome. Oh, and I have to admit, I am just a teensy bit scared of doing it because I’m afraid if I try it I’ll lose all the info on the old sites.  Whoever said doing genealogy was easy?

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Beatrice Bordeaux Elopes With Kenneth Palmer

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I found this clipping in my collection of newspaper articles my Yates family had saved. If you have been reading this blog for a while you might have seen other articles about the Bordeaux family, and why my family was “connected” to them. Every time I find a piece of written memorabilia such as this one, it adds at least one more piece to the puzzle a family history. This one’s for you Bob Bordeaux, and any of your family that is interested.

Also, here is a more lengthy article about the Bordeaux-Palmer elopement from the Seattle Post Intelligencer.  I know it’s very hard to read because of the wrinkles and the one fold over, and so I will be transcribing it and posting it here at a later date. I am just so lucky that my family saved these newspaper articles so I can share them with the Bordeaux family and all of my readers.

Previous Bordeaux articles:


A Visit To Old Bordeaux

iPentimento » A Personal History With Trains

Vintage Photos at Shadow Catchers Capture WA State History

A Visit To Old Bordeaux

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[Due to a blog glitch, I have re-posted this story.]

Bordeaux, WA circa 1910

Last Friday, my aunt Twyla and Uncle Wally Yates, my cousins Edris and Jack Harbeston, my brother Dave Yates and his wife Kathy, and my husband Jim and I, went on a little adventure so Wally could visit “one more time” the old town of Bordeaux here in Washington state. Actually, the town is not in existence anymore, but some things are still there.

WebLunchSettingKathyAndDavid's

Our trip on May 9th was made after we had a nice lunch at Dave and Kathy’s, and our weather couldn’t have been much better for this time of year. Warm and sunny enough to be comfortable, and we got lucky and bypassed any rain.

 

 

In our Suburban, and Dave’s Yukon, we drove from my brother’s place near Tenino, WA via Old Highway 99 North, turning left at 93rd Ave SE and we then headed west to the Littlerock Road. My uncle Wally was in our vehicle, so as we drove along he would spot different points of interest along the way and tell us about them. Some were known to us, some, were not. At one point on the Littlerock road as we rounded a curve, he said that it was where his brother Guy had been killed in a car accident in December of 1938. He said the curve had been straightened out considerably in the last 70 years and it doesn’t look dangerous at all now.

My Yates family settled in Bordeaux around 1925, even though Grandpa Will Yates had made the trip from West Plains, MO many times before that year. When Grandma and Grandpa moved to Bordeaux, Grandpa’s brother Lem and one of his sisters (Lydia) already lived there which always makes it easier for any new arrivals. My dad Gale was the oldest boy as he was born in 1920; the next boy was the previously mentioned Guy who was two years younger. The youngest boy, Waldo (aka Wally) was born in 1927, a couple years after they arrived in Bordeaux. So, Wally lived in this logging town from his birth until 1942 when the mill closed.

 

 

Even though Wally has macular degeneration in one eye and the town no longer exists, I know he could see it in his mind’s eye just like it was yesterday. As we drove up the Bordeaux road, and past one of the old vaults that had been in the hotel, he began to get his bearings even better. The old Bordeaux house where the family lived is still there, but of course is not owned by the family any more. My Grandmother, Minnie Yates died of botulism poisoning in 1932 from eating unheated home-canned corn. In 1936 my Grandpa remarried to a lady named Josie Scribner and she worked up at the Bordeaux house as a nanny and housekeeper for the two sons, Joe and Bruce. Wally had been one of the few kids allowed into the Bordeaux house to play with the boys when they were home because his step mother worked there.

The drive up to the house has a metal gate and a sign that says it is private property and protected by armed guards. This may be because most recently the house was owned by Curt Cobain’s widow, Courtney Love. It may have been bought by someone else now, since it was up for sale at one time to pay off the debt, but for us, it was not a place we could visit on our trek.

 

After driving around on Bordeaux Road from Keen’s corner all the way up to the Cedar Creek Correctional Center at the end, we doubled back and stopped again at a wide spot in the road near the little creek that runs on the south side. This is most likely Cedar Creek (my family pronounces it “crick”) and it is now just a gentle caretaker of the old pilings and cement blocks that are the only evidence that the town and mill were once located there. We got out of our vehicles and began to meander around, first just by the road and taking pictures of the Bordeaux house through the now thick alder and fir trees. Someone found a trail on the south side of the road and while my cousin Jack explored the woods up on the house side of the road, Jim and Dave, with Wally following more cautiously behind, headed over the makeshift bridge and on up into the southern hillside where they found some old brick remains of the mill.

 

I don’t know for sure if Wally got a true reconnoitering of where the town and the old houses he remembered were, but I think he enjoyed the day immensely. The only downside to the day was when Twyla was trying to cross a little rivulet and she lost her footing and fell face first down into the mud. It wasn’t a total ‘face plant’, she landed on one side, but she was all muddy, and eventually cold and I am sure she was more than ready to get back to Dave’s and into some dry clothes!

Click here to see all 44 photos from this trip on Flicker

 

Olympia Motorcycle Club Enduro circa 1938

Olympia Motorcycle Club

Thurston County Motorcycle History

Years ago I put together a shadow box for my parents of Yates memorabilia that included WWI and WWII medals for my grandfather Will Yates and my dad, William Gale Yates respectively. In that shadow box was included a little bit of Olympia Motorcycle Club history.

Olympia Motorcycle Club

My dad isn’t in the above photo because I believe he took the picture, hence the Y shown predominantly in the lower corner of the shot. I am also sorry to say that I can’t precisely date the year it was taken. The accompanying newspaper article was clipped from a page and no date was written on it either.

My dad was born in 1920, so it’s possible this photo could have been taken in 1938, 1939, 1940, or even in 1941. If someone knows motorcycles and can see anything in this photo that would identify a year, please let me know. I’m not sure the photo above even goes with the article. It might just be some of the guys my dad rode with at another time.

Olympia Motorcycle Club Article

The Newspaper Article About the Enduro Contest

DAVE NOURSE  TAKES MOTORCYCLE CONTEST

Dave Nourse, Seattle, American Motorcycle Association, captured the Enduro run Sunday sponsored by the Olympia Motorcycle Club. The 250-mile run was over logging trails, abandoned roads and other difficult routes through Thurston, Lewis and Cowlitz counties, starting and finishing at Littlerock. Fred Travis, Seattle, was a passenger with Nourse. The winner had a score of 872 out of a possible perfect mark of 1000.

Red Farwell, Tacoma Motorcycle Club, took second with a score of 853; Gale Yates, Olympia Motorcycle Club, third with 802 and Gus Peterson, Lewis County Motorcycle Club was the only other motorcycle entry to finish. His score was 607. Kenneth Knutson was a passenger of Peterson’s. Eight started the contest.

Nourse is a former Ohio State Enduro champion in the expert class.  The race here Sunday marked his first since coming west and his 13th in all.  The contest was the first sanctioned endurance event staged in the northwest this year.

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William Gale Yates 1934

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William Gale Yates 1939

(He forged his dad’s signature to buy this Harley)

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