December 22, 2014

Bean Family Civil War Veterans – Iowa

Richard R Bean alone

 

Bean Family Civil War Veterans - Iowa

Richard Lemuel Bean

1808-1869

From the Nashua, Iowa Library:

He served in Company C, in the 6th Iowa Cavalry

“I do not know the year he moved to Nashua from St. Lawrence County, New York, but it was very probably right after the birth of his son Holton who was born in St. Lawrence County in 1849. He did not move directly to Nashua, but lived several years in Lansing, Michigan where two children were born.

They were in Nashua when the Civil War broke out and he was determined to enlist with four of his sons: Henry, Levi, George, and Holton. He also wanted to enlist but the Board would not take him on account of his age. His wife told him if he did enlist, not to come back to her. He did anyway, by going to another county; cut off his beard, dyed his hair with walnut stain, and made it. He was discharged a year later with an injury to his hips in battle.

He returned to Nashua and built a home on some land he owned 2 miles north of town, and lived there for the rest of his life.  He owned and operated a saw mill before the war, but with his injured hips he could no longer do the work.

Before coming to Iowa he was a [I suspect he was a “sawyer” and [someone misread the writing on the census record–C] lawyer in Vermont and New York State. “

~~~

Levi Lemuel Bean

1836-1863

7th Iowa Infantry

~~~

Richard Rufus Bean


1838-1928

(GG-Grandfather of James A. Wilkerson)

Richard Bean was a Private in the Union Army, Co. G, 27th Iowa Infantry. He mustered in October 3, 1862 (maybe at Dubuque, IA). It says on the Company Muster-in Roll that he was 24 years old and that his occupation was as a farmer. He enlisted August 15, 1862 in Nashua, Iowa for a period of 3 years. the enlistment person was A. L. Rupe. It also says he had black hair and eyes and his complexion was dark. He was five foot, five and a half inches tall. On that date he was to be paid the sum of $25, and the premium paid was $2.00.

The battles in which he fought were: Battle of Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, April 9, 1864; and Old Oaks, Louisiana, May 18, 1864; Ditch Bayou, Arkansas, June 6, 1864; Tupelo and Old Town Creek, Mississippi, July 15 and 16, 1864; Nashville, Tennessee, December 15 and 16, 1864; and the Siege and Capture of Blakely, Alabama, April 2 through 9, 1865.

June 1863 he went to the regimental hospital (Gayoso USA General Hospital) in Memphis, TN because he was sick. On August 24, 1863 he left at Memphis, Tennessee because he was sick. During the months of September and October 1863 he was employed as a guard at the hospital until he returned to duty. He rejoined his Company from the hospital December 10, 1863.

Richard’s muster-out date was August 8, 1865. At that time, he had last been paid to February 28, 1865. He mustered-out in Clinton, Iowa. At that time they paid him a bounty of $25 and he was due $75.

In 1896 Richard R. Bean applied for a pension from the government for his service in the Civil War.

~~~

George Willard Bean

1840-1928

Union Army, Co. G, 27th Iowa Infantry

George W. Bean was in the 27th Iowa Infantry, Company G, along with his brother Richard R. Bean.

~~~

Holton David Bean

1849-1928

7th Iowa Infantry, Company B

Holton Bean was in the 7th Iowa Infantry, Company B in the Civil War. His brother Levi L Bean was also in this unit.

Aged Anita man Hangs Self Sunday.   Holten D. Bean father of Leslie Bean takes life early Sunday Morning at L. D. Bean residence.   5 or 6 years resident of Anita.   Committed suicide early Sunday morning by hanging himself farm home of son Leslie Bean with whom made home.   Despondency cause of death.   W. L. Edwards who has room at Bean home arose Sunday morning about 7:00 a.m. and going barn to get car, saw in semi-darkness in 1 of stalls what appeared figure of man hanging from 1 of rafters.   Had used piece of uninsulated telephone wire as he hung toes touched ground.   Had made home Anita since wife died.   Funeral Bean home.   Interment cemetery Casey.   (Vindicator, Casey, Ia., Oct. 25, 1928)

Obituary Holten David Bean born Yorktown, Canada Nov. 27, 1849 and died home son L. E. Bean Anita Oct. 21 age 78 and 10 m. 24d.   Married Mary Jane Morrison 1876 and 2 daughters and 1 son.   Mrs. Bean died Mar. 1923.   Left Mrs. Dora Highland of Vancouver, Washington, Mrs. Georgia Witherspoon of Danville, Ill. and Leslie Bean of Anita, 9 grandchildren. Funeral Anita.   Interment Oakwood.   (Vindicator, Casey, Ia., Oct. 25, 1928)

~~~

Here was the greatest and most moving chapter in American history, a blending of meanness and greatness, an ending and a beginning. It came out of what men were, but it did not go as men had planned.
– from “The Coming Fury”

From An Odyssey Of Quotes

© Carol Yates Wilkerson 2011

 

John Breedlove Civil War Diary: Deaths 1864

vkmilitary_011


It’s always a goal of mine to share information I think will be helpful to other genealogists and family historians. My cousin Kathleen and I recently received the gift of a lifetime: a scanned copy of our GG-Grandfather John W. Breedlove’s Civil War diary. As soon as I brought it in from the mailbox I sat down to read it and along the way I noticed he had written names and dates of men who had died in his unit, or as he learned of them.  By adding them here on this blog it enables the families to find them in a search.


Record of Deaths or Wounded from John Breedlove CW Diary - 1864

List of wounded of the 32nd MO at the late Battle of Jonesborough GA (as written)

[wounded]

Thomas Mathews, Lt. Co B

Joseph Kelly, Sergt Co G

Jas Norris, priv Co G

Jas Bier priv Co G

Thos Scrimpsher, priv Co B

David Boyer, priv Co B

David Elliot, Corp Co D

Killed

Lewis [Louis] Jelison, Co H

John Burgizer, Co K

My Civil War Ancestors – John Watts Breedlove

john-breedlove-with-sword

My Great-Great Grandfather was John Watts Breedlove. Many of my family have called him John Wyatt Breedlove for years, but I believe his middle name really was Watts. The name Wyatt doesn’t show up in any of the naming patterns of the family, while the name Watts does, as it was his Granfather’s middle name, and John’s Great-Grandmother’s maiden name was Mary Watts. I would be happy to make corrections if someone can provide me with documented proof.

John Breedlove fought in Civil War, Volunteers of Company E, 32nd Regiment,  Missouri Infantry as a Sergeant. Enlisted August 13, 1862 at Steelville, Missouri. Discharged 18 July 1865 in Louisville, KY; promoted to First Sgt. He was with General Sherman on the March to the Sea. I have a copy of a picture of him in his Civil War uniform that had written on the back, “Chattanooga”. The 32nd Regiment was in Chattanooga, TN from Nov. to Dec. 1863.

John was a resident of Dent County, Missouri from 1865 to 1880. His father was William Martin Breedlove who migrated from Simpson County, KY to St. Francois County, MO in the early 1800’s.

John’s first wife, Mary Francis Wright, was the sister to his second wife Elizabeth Jane Wright Wilson. Mary Francis died in March 1861, soon after giving birth to a baby boy. The baby died a few months later.  Undoubtedly, John went off to the War with a broken heart and shaken spirit. His religious beliefs were no doubt what sustained him.

Just a note to genetic genealogists, John was first cousin to both of his wives, and not being a geneticist myself, I have no idea what that might have cost them as they had children. In that day and age it wasn’t unheard of to marry a first cousin, but now it is not as widely accepted because of genetic diseases that might be passed on.  As it stands now, I am my own cousin, and my son is also my 5th cousin, once removed.

John Breedlove, with second wife Elizabeth

and son Russell Breedlove b. 1889. Russell was the youngest child.

147 Year Old Breedlove Civil War Diary

Wayne Breedlove with JWB diary

Wayne Breedlove with JWB diary

The Caretaker

Pictured above is my 2nd cousin, once removed, Wayne Breedlove who generously brought the John W. Breedlove diary with him from Florida when he visited us last week. Wayne’s father, Othel Breedlove was the man who ‘rescued’ the diary from obscurity decades ago. Wayne found it in his dad’s camper, tucked away on a shelf in a bag of some sort.

diary 01 and shell

Reunited Mementos

It was just by chance the colors of the conch shell matched the tablecloth so well last Sunday. The shell is just as old as the diary though, and it was a reunion for it to be with the diary because John Breedlove had brought it home with him from the east coast as a benign memento of his wartime trek with Sherman’s army on their ‘march to the sea’.

John enlisted as a Sgt.  on August 13, 1862 at Steelville, Missouri and was placed in Company E of the 32nd Regiment, Missouri volunteers when he mustered in October 18, 1862 under Capt. Clark.

Wayne, Kathleen, Jack, Dave and Marilyn

The Breedlove Descendants

The five people in this picture are all descendants of John W. Breedlove. They are: L-R – Wayne Breedlove, Kathleen Rice O’Neill, Jack Harbeston, Dave Yates, and in front, Marilyn Scott Tank. Also attending were Kathleen’s mother Anna Helmick Rice, and of course, myself.

I hope to add more detailed information about the contents of the diary as we get a better look at the pages. Wayne is planning to scan them and then give each of us the digital images for our records.  When I get them, I will share some of them with all of you.

diary 02 first page

Wayne Breedlove and Carol Yates Wilkerson.jpg

Wayne Breedlove and Carol Yates Wilkerson

14 June 2009

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