March 29, 2015

When Grandmas Go Wild – Lillian V Epstein Moline

Eppie Moline and Dave Y

When Grandmas Go Wild

My Grandmas personalities seemed to me to be at opposite ends of the “wildness” spectrum, and it was most obvious in this picture of my mom’s step mother Lillian Vera Epstein Moline. My other grandmother, my dad’s step mother Josie McVey Yates, was as docile as they come. I did hear her say “shit” once, but it was not her normal language.

I didn’t see my Moline grandparents as often as my Yates ones because they lived in Seattle and when I was growing up going to Seattle was a ‘big excursion’. I say that because before Interstate 5 was built all we had for the main road was Highway 99, and it took hours to get to Seattle on a two lane road.

My two sets of grandparents knew each other because at one time they lived in the same mill town of Bordeaux, WA. Grandpa Yates worked in the mill as a “setter” for the saws that reduced the big trees to long slabs of dimensional lumber. My grandpa Moline, who had more education, worked for the Mumby Lumber company as a salesman. His wife, “Eppie” was a registered nurse, but when they moved to Bordeaux in 1933 she kept it pretty quiet that she had any medical training so as not to be constantly asked for help.

Grandma Eppie had a very outgoing and humorous personality. Most likely because when you’ve been a nurse, you’ve seen it all and some human behavior can be pretty funny. Eppie’s ethnicity was Jewish. She was loud, liked to tell jokes, play bridge and smother us with slobbery kisses. Kisses were given while blubbering when we first got together for a visit, and the same at the end of the visit.

I can’t be sure who took this picture, but I suspect it was my grandpa Al (Elvin Moline) because Eppie would have done this kind of pose for him, and my brother Dave would have posed like that to go along with the frisky behavior. Grandpa Al always had a camera with him and usually one of the more expensive ones, rather than the “Brownie” box camera that my parents had. I’m just guessing, but I think this picture was taken in the 1950’s sometime, just going by the makes and models of the cars. The Ford in the background belonged to my Grandpa Yates and as far as I know he bought it new, with cash.

Other clues in the picture are my brother’s size which makes me think he was around twelve or thirteen. The shed in the background eventually was re-roofed and dad built a car port off the side facing us in the photo. I know one thing, this picture was taken before October 12, 1962 because several of the trees in the picture didn’t survive that storm. Surprisingly enough, the tree under where Grandpa Yates parked his Ford was a huge cherry tree and it did make it through the “Big Blow”. The other big tree in the background was an apple tree and it didn’t survive.

I realize that anyone else looking at this old black and white photo won’t have the same feeling about it that I do. Even my brother probably has other, deeper, memories than I do since he was older. This picture, for all of its ‘old-timey’ look and the antics of my grandma, is my connection to my history when we lived on Dennis Street in Tumwater, Washington. We didn’t live in a grand house, and we lived all the way at the end of the end of the road, but it was my world. I have history here. I have good and bad memories of living here. And, for the time the photo or this article lasts, it’s proof that we lived interesting lives. Rest in peace Grandma Eppie, you are not forgotten.

Lillian Vera Epstein Moline 1904 – 1975

52 Weeks of Personal Genealogy & History – Weather

Google Books: A Surprising Source For Genealogical Documentation

Google-Books

 

My budget is pretty tight when it comes to genealogical research, so when I found I could add documentation to my family tree using (mostly) free Google Books, you can imagine my elation.

Google-Books

Most recently,

I found a book

about Archibald Glasscock Register written by one of his descendants (G. W. Register Jones) and originally compiled by two of his daughters from letters he had sent to family members back in Greene County, Tennessee.

The title of this article is somewhat misleading in that the results of a search in Google Books doesn’t just bring back links to books, but any sort of written documentation that has been added to Google. It could be old newspaper articles, snippets from books, biographies, or even lists from surname newsletters. So far, I’ve just scratched the surface of what’s available.

My Book List On Google

My current preferred method of adding books to my book list on Google is on my PC, but you can also add them to your device using Google Play and read them on your tablet, e-reader or phone. Depending on the amount of storage you might have on each device, you’ll be able to start reading on one, stop, and then continue on another. For more detailed information please visit Google’s Supported reading device (“best for”) page.

Surnames I’m researching in Greene County, Tennessee are: REGISTER, CHANCE, YATES, KELSEY, ROBERTSON, HACKER and GLASSCOCK.

 

Roboform Fix For Firefox Browser

FF logo

FF logo Roboform logo

After a recent update of Roboform, I began getting an error message that stated:

Can not load RoboForm add-on
Please restart browser or reinstall RoboForm

TypeError: aId is undefined
resource://app/modules/CustomizableUI.jsm(1104)

Before contacting Roboform support, I did uninstall and then reinstalled RF to see if that solved the problem. It didn’t, so I then sent a support ticket to Roboform support, Including the error message text.

The reply from TS  Olivia came back within a few minutes:

Olivia replied (2015/01/30 11:22 pm EST):
Please UNcheck the option ‘Attach RoboForm to Firefox even if adapter is not installed’ in RoboForm > Options > Browser Integration
click OK and restart Firefox, if running.
Should help.

The result was that it did help and Firefox no longer shows that error message.

 

A G REGISTER – Man of God, Man of Gold

Register book

Register book

A G REGISTER – Man of God, Man of Gold

Archibald Glasscock Register, the son of Francis and Jemima Glasscock Register was born in Greene County Tennessee near Lick Creek on 24 February 1822. Raised in an era of comparative innocence and unspoiled nature in east Tennessee, even from an early age he was raised in a home whose focus was not just daily existence but with a foundation in their religion.

Gone To California

As a young man, word came to him of the gold rush in California that began in 1848. In 1852 Archibald, along with some other men in his community, made their way to the gold fields near Georgetown, California to make their fortune or die trying. The original plan, to leave from Charleston, South Carolina fell through for some reason and instead Archie and his party left from New Orleans and traveled to Independence, Missouri to go the overland route to Sacramento.

Archibald worked in the mines of Georgetown for several years. He may not have made a fortune, but in one of his letters home he did mention that he had sent some gold home to his family. He spent five years in California. By 24 June 1857 he was again home in the company of his family enjoying the comforts there that he had not known while he kept house in a dusty cabin during his mining days.

These Died in California and Oregon

You never know what other documentation might be in a book like this. I noted that some names were mentioned in A G Register’s cited letters in the book as those who had passed away during his time in California.

The father of Archibald Hartman, who is listed in the book as just “Hartman” died in Georgetown and is buried there. [I have since found that the Hartman mentioned was William Hartman, husband of Register’s sister Lucinda]. Hartman is buried in that town although I have not been able to find his grave in any formal cemetery as yet. Register mentions another man named McAll who died somewhere in Oregon and didn’t receive a formal burial. The third name mentioned was Robertson, and I’m still in the process of determining how this Robertson man is connected to Register.

 

All of the information about Archibald Register for this article has been extrapolated from the book created by his daughters entitled Life of Rev. A.G. Register - By G. W. Register Jones (a descendant). The book is available in its entirety for free through Google books. It can be read as an e-book, downloaded in PDF format, or added to your Google library for later.