December 21, 2014

Enter To Win 100 Free Color Print Postcards!

NextDayFlyers.com Web Logo

Who: NextDayFlyers.com is making this offer available through my blog.  They are located in Rancho Domingo, CA and have been in business for over 10 years and one of their many services is postcard printing for your special needs.

What: To the winner, chosen by me using Random.org, they will help you make 100 4 X 6 inch custom postcards, full color on one side, black and white on the other. Entrants are limited to the continental United States.

How To Enter: Please leave a comment telling me how you will use the postcards, along with your email address. Duplicate entries will be discarded. When I have chosen the winner I will contact NextDayFlyers with your information and they will fulfill your order by setting up an account with the credit in place.

Start and Stop Dates: Begins – Wednesday, May 17, 2011 and runs through Wednesday, May 24, 2011.  The winner will be chosen the 25th and you should expect an email from me that same day. (I’m in the Pacific Daylight Time Zone).

Here are some excellent ideas for ways you might use the postcards:

Announcement: Baby, graduation, family reunion, birthday party, Father’s Day, Save the Date, an anniversary, wedding or baby shower, etc.

Genealogy: Put a family photo on one side, and ask for additional family information on the other; share a full color family tree and send to cousins and kin; make a collage of your military heroes to share with family.

Thank you very much to NextDayFlyers.com for making this giveaway possible!

Tell me what you might do with your postcards! I’m looking forward to your comments. :)

Visit The GenealogyLuv Store And Start Customizing!

 

I have a new store on Zazzle! It’s called GenealogyLuv. I’m slowly adding some new sections as I go along, but I wanted to show you my latest creation.  What could be more useful than a binder for your genealogy things?  The best part is, the design(s) can be customized.  Like with the binder, you can add a surname to the front, or say it’s for photos, a scrapbook…anything!

There’s more in the store…Go see!

Two Genealogy Tips On Tuesday

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The title sounds catchy, but if I come up with more than two, I’m not changing it!

Fill Our Your Profiles!

Here’s the first one:  Fill out your profiles on sites such as Ancestry.  It doesn’t take that long to type in your name, add a profile photo, etc.  I am currently exchanging messages with a very nice lady who is probably a cousin, her name sounds familiar, but she has not yet filled out that profile so I’m left scratching my head and wondering how I connect. Which leads me to tip number two.

The Home Person In Your Family Tree – Shouldn’t It Be You?

On Ancestry, if you have uploaded a GEDCOM (privatized, of course) you have the option of making yourself the home person.  This just makes sense since you’re the one who uploaded the file and will be sharing it with the world.  People would like to know who the owner is and this is another easy thing to do.

I’ve said it many times before, but I’ll say it again: Genealogical research is all about connecting. Connecting with people, connecting your family trees, and even connecting your profiles. I don’t know how long it’s taken me, but I always take the time to connect my social networking sites to one another.  When I sign up for a new site I take the time to add them.  Genealogy isn’t for hermits, is it?

 

 

 

 

 

How To Do A Genealogical Interview

Hand with pencil

Get comfortable

If you have made arrangements ahead of time to interview a particular person, try to do it in a quiet setting where there will be little or no interruptions. If you will be tape recording your subject, make sure ahead of time that your recorder is in prime working order (batteries, settings, etc.) and set it close enough to pick up all the dialog, especially if you have a quiet speaking interviewee. Talk about general topics if you will be taking notes, to get them comfortable with the interview setting. Speak slowly and clearly. Tell your subject that you will give them a break when they need one.

Begin with the basics

Depending on what you might already know about your subject’s name and birth dates, you can skip that information and focus on other questions that might give you more background information.

Some questions to ask:

  • Where were you born? (City, state, country)
  • Were you born at home, or in a hospital or nursing home?
  • Do you know what time of day you were born?
  • Was there a world event that took place the same day? (End of a war, weather event, etc.)
  • Were there other siblings? (This could lead to a long answer, so maybe save it to ask in a separate session.)
  • Where do you fall in birth order?
  • Did your parents both work? What were their professions?
  • What do you know about your mother’s/father’s ancestors? (City, state, country)
  • Are there any celebrities in your family tree?
  • Why did they come to the United States from that country?
  • Did they bring any family traditions with them?
  • What important lessons did you learn from your (Mother, father, grandparents, etc.)
  • Who were the best story tellers in your family?
  • What will you always remember about them?
  • Were you taught any special skills? (Cooking, carpentry, sewing, fishing, hunting, etc.)
  • What were the things you did as a child, teen, and adult that have given you the most pleasure?
  • Were you ever in any accidents?
  • What were the newest discoveries during the time you were growing up?
  • How has the world changed since you were a child?
  • In what way was the world better then?
  • What was your favorite subject in school?
  • What did you like to do after school?
  • Did you ride a bike to school, a bus, or walk? Or, were you taken to school by car?
  • Did you get good grades?
  • What was the extent of your formal education?
  • Is there anything that you would like to tell me about that you feel I should know?

Don’t expect to get all of your questions answered in one sitting. Take this list with you and highlight the most important things you want to know. If your subject is willing to answer more questions, then go back and ask your secondary questions.

Depending on your relationship with the subject, keep in mind that your questions could bring up sad or angry memories. If they do, either move on,change the subject or end the interview. This should be a fun exercise, not something unpleasant. Happy interviewing! :)

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