December 20, 2014

Kiva Lending Team – Genealogists for Families

kiva_121x64

In Memory of Joan Miller

I’ve known about Kiva for years, but until earlier this month I hadn’t ever made a loan through them. What prompted me though was the death of one of the genealogy community’s treasured friends, Joan Miller. Joan was the author of her own genealogy blog and passed away on January 4th after a year-long battle with cancer. Her friend Judy Webster in Australia has written a wonderful tribute to Joan on her blog Genealogy Leftovers.

Genealogists For Families – Kiva Lending Team

Genealogists are a world-wide community, but very tight-knit and caring. Even though I was a late-comer to the Kiva Lending Team – Genealogists for Families, I can tell you this group has done some really wonderful things for people around the world through their loans.  Whether you are a genealogist or not, it would be so wonderful if you made your loan through the Genealogists for Families lending team link above. Doing so makes more loans available for more people.

kiva_121x64

Carol Wilkerson’s Kiva profile Page

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Herbert Hadley Harbeston 20 May 1910 – 23 Dec 2012

I may have met Herb and his wife Fran many years ago during my childhood, but my first real recollection of them was at the home of my great aunt Martha’s son Claude when we attended an after funeral gathering of family at Claude and Billy’s home in Tacoma, Washington. Fran was my cousin through the Yates family, her mother being Myra Yates who was an older sister to my grandfather Will Yates. Myra had married Joe Prantl 30 December 1908 in West Plains, Missouri.

tintypes

It seemed like the only time I would see Fran and Herb was at funerals. Fran passed away in 1996, just a couple months before my dad did in June. I began communicating by letter with Herb (he had hearing loss, so telephoning was out of the question) because my dad, for whatever reason, had given Fran some tintypes that my grandpa had brought back with him when it made a trip to Tennessee in the early 1910’s. I was working on our family tree at a pretty good clip at that point and since Fran had passed away (she too had been doing some family genealogy at one time) I asked Herb if I could get the tintypes back from him for our family photo records. He agreed, and we drove all the way over to Soap Lake, WA to get them.

We had a wonderful visit with Herb, his sister-in-law Tracy and Tracy’s husband Rick (Herman) Richardson, and my brother Dave and wife Kathy who had traveled along with us that day.

Through the years we have stayed in touch with Herb until his Alzheimer’s condition made things more difficult for him. At one of the facilities he was in years ago, he greeted us warmly and admitted he didn’t know who we were, but he was grateful that we had come to see him. I think that will tell you just how warm and loving he was. Herb was a centenarian of the first order!

English: Oroville Dam, CA from the air, high w...

English: Oroville Dam, CA from the air, high water unknown date (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Just a little side note: Working as an engineer and concrete inspector, Herb was involved in the building of the Oroville Dam in Oroville, California.

Herbert Harbeston Obituary

Enhanced by Zemanta

Dual Citizenship Through DNA Results?

DNA Testing

As someone who has elected to have my own DNA tests done, I can see that if the various DNA testing labs keep making it affordable, this is going to be an industry that will keep on growing. I know my Cherokee friend said that her family members are investigating having their’s done too.  Right now, as the article says, the backlog for all of us might be a big problem.

African Americans

More U.S. blacks seek African roots – UPI.com
Right now, the problem I see is that we have a long way to go to get all of us into more definitive family groups. I was surprised at the concept of having a dual citizenship through DNA results for African American people, but it makes sense to me. My own family tree is probably too diluted to apply for the same citizenship for Sweden, even though my Great Grandparents emigrated from there. Truthfully though, I don’t consider myself a Swedish-American. I’m just American citizen of the USA.

Dual Citizenship

Would you seek dual citizenship if it was available to you?

WA State History – The Fire Lookout Builders

nooksacklookout-hoh

“Where there’s smoke, there’s fire”, so they say. Roadside signs here in Washington state give the forest fire danger level each summer and fall. They say it rains here in Washington all the time, and the locals let you believe that so we don’t have more people moving here, but the truth is, it gets pretty dry by late July and lasts into August and September at times. Forest fires have always been a part of life here in the Pacific Northwest, and always will be.

My first memory of my dad working for the State Forestry Service was when I was about 5 or 6. Of course, I took it more personally because when Dad was away on a job Mom would let us have cool things like pancakes for supper. Looking at it as an adult, I imagine that Dad probably hated those jobs building fire lookouts for the State. It was darn hard work, even for a young guy in his 30’s. One of his recollections says when he worked at the fire lookout in Raymond, “It rained every day!”.

The reason this topic is even on my family history radar is because I am transcribing a list of jobs my dad worked on throughout his life as a carpenter. In that list he mentions several of the lookouts he helped build, and I was just astounded at the sheer number of them. Some had been built decades before and were being upgraded in the mid-1950’s when he was involved, but some might have been new construction.

Somewhere, I think we might have a picture or two of some lookouts he worked on, but I found a really nifty site today that lists some of the lookouts with pictures of them when they were still in service. The website is: 

The photos on the page are indexed and I would like to show some of them here, but they are private and only viewable on the pages.

Here is a link to some of the WA state lookout towers by region. A few that Dad (W. G. Yates) worked on are: Squally Jim at Pe Ell; Entwhistle (Dad’s first job for the Forestry); Coyote Mountain; Crawford Mountain; Deep Creek, Ladd Mountain, Raymond, Capitol Peak (gone now; Dad said you could see the Pacific Ocean on a clear day!); Elk Rock – near Mt. St. Helens; and even one here in Port Orchard. The logo above is from Rex’s site and I have made it a link to his main page if you would like to give him a visit.

This is just tiny glimpse into one man’s work accomplishments and contributions. Dad was of the G.I. Generation since he was born in 1920 and a WWII veteran. I miss him every day.

More from iPentimento:

 

© 2007-2014 iPentimento|Genealogy and History All Rights Reserved -- Copyright notice by Blog Copyright