November 29, 2015

Family travel five: Explore patriots’ sacrifices at military museums

Our nation’s veteran and military museums provide a window into an important aspect of our collective history. Here are five places where you and your family can learn about the lives, experiences and resources available to those who serve: 1. The National Museum of the Marine Corps, Quantico, Va. Top-notch technology and interactive exhibits combine to… [Read more…]

Kiva Lending Team – Genealogists for Families

In Memory of Joan Miller

I’ve known about Kiva for years, but until earlier this month I hadn’t ever made a loan through them. What prompted me though was the death of one of the genealogy community’s treasured friends, Joan Miller. Joan was the author of her own genealogy blog and passed away on January 4th after a year-long battle with cancer. Her friend Judy Webster in Australia has written a wonderful tribute to Joan on her blog Genealogy Leftovers.

Genealogists For Families – Kiva Lending Team

Genealogists are a world-wide community, but very tight-knit and caring. Even though I was a late-comer to the Kiva Lending Team – Genealogists for Families, I can tell you this group has done some really wonderful things for people around the world through their loans.  Whether you are a genealogist or not, it would be so wonderful if you made your loan through the Genealogists for Families lending team link above. Doing so makes more loans available for more people.


Carol Wilkerson’s Kiva profile Page


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Herbert Hadley Harbeston 20 May 1910 – 23 Dec 2012

I may have met Herb and his wife Fran many years ago during my childhood, but my first real recollection of them was at the home of my great aunt Martha’s son Claude when we attended an after funeral gathering of family at Claude and Billy’s home in Tacoma, Washington. Fran was my cousin through the Yates family, her mother being Myra Yates who was an older sister to my grandfather Will Yates. Myra had married Joe Prantl 30 December 1908 in West Plains, Missouri.


It seemed like the only time I would see Fran and Herb was at funerals. Fran passed away in 1996, just a couple months before my dad did in June. I began communicating by letter with Herb (he had hearing loss, so telephoning was out of the question) because my dad, for whatever reason, had given Fran some tintypes that my grandpa had brought back with him when it made a trip to Tennessee in the early 1910’s. I was working on our family tree at a pretty good clip at that point and since Fran had passed away (she too had been doing some family genealogy at one time) I asked Herb if I could get the tintypes back from him for our family photo records. He agreed, and we drove all the way over to Soap Lake, WA to get them.

We had a wonderful visit with Herb, his sister-in-law Tracy and Tracy’s husband Rick (Herman) Richardson, and my brother Dave and wife Kathy who had traveled along with us that day.

Through the years we have stayed in touch with Herb until his Alzheimer’s condition made things more difficult for him. At one of the facilities he was in years ago, he greeted us warmly and admitted he didn’t know who we were, but he was grateful that we had come to see him. I think that will tell you just how warm and loving he was. Herb was a centenarian of the first order!

English: Oroville Dam, CA from the air, high w...

English: Oroville Dam, CA from the air, high water unknown date (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Just a little side note: Working as an engineer and concrete inspector, Herb was involved in the building of the Oroville Dam in Oroville, California.

Herbert Harbeston Obituary

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Dual Citizenship Through DNA Results?

DNA Testing

As someone who has elected to have my own DNA tests done, I can see that if the various DNA testing labs keep making it affordable, this is going to be an industry that will keep on growing. I know my Cherokee friend said that her family members are investigating having their’s done too.  Right now, as the article says, the backlog for all of us might be a big problem.

African Americans

More U.S. blacks seek African roots –
Right now, the problem I see is that we have a long way to go to get all of us into more definitive family groups. I was surprised at the concept of having a dual citizenship through DNA results for African American people, but it makes sense to me. My own family tree is probably too diluted to apply for the same citizenship for Sweden, even though my Great Grandparents emigrated from there. Truthfully though, I don’t consider myself a Swedish-American. I’m just American citizen of the USA.

Dual Citizenship

Would you seek dual citizenship if it was available to you?