November 28, 2014

Ina Pentecost Smith 1913-2012

Ina Pentecost Smith 2001


INA PENTECOST SMITH 1913-2012
Ina M. Pentecost Hopkins Smith Passed away Friday, May 25th at the age of 98 at St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Tacoma, Washington. Many of her loving family were with her. She was born in Brandsville, Missouri, December 15, 1913.

Ina was the twelfth child of James Eli Shields Pentecost and Laura Francis Breedlove Pentecost. She married Chester (Chet) Lloyd Hopkins January 25, 1930 in Melbourne, Arkansas, where they had three children.

They were having a very difficult time during the Depression and decided to move to Alaska in 1939. When Chet arrived in Alaska he started working for the Alaska Railroad. He and Ina built a house on Nugget Avenue in Spenard, Alaska, where they had three more children.

In 1943 Ina married Roy H. D. Smith, who worked as a foreman for the Alaska Railroad. He and Ina built a three-bedroom home, a triplex, a duplex, and a small, one-bedroom house. The rental business helped supplement his income as they proceeded to have six more children, and enabled Ina to stay home and care for their children. She instilled a strong love of family, faith, and helping others who were less fortunate in all her children.

In 1963, Roy and Ina, with the five youngest children, moved to Tacoma, Washington to live and be able to help take care of his 85-year-old mother. Ina lived 49 years in Tacoma. Ina was always involved in her children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and great-great-grandchildren’s lives. She was the conduit for all information regarding her family and many friends throughout her life. Ina was so very proud of her children. She would frequently state, “I have twelve children, and they’re all natural!” They were all single births too.

She had 33 grandchildren, 58 great-grandchildren, and 29 great-great-grandchildren. She was preceded by husbands Chester Hopkins, Roy R. D. Smith, Gary Kassuth, and Harold Hopkins, son Roy Lee Hopkins, daughter Doris Richardson, granddaughter Lerrina Smith, great-granddaughter Shelcy Diebert, and great-grandson Ayden Beall.

Ina is survived by Ida Elizabeth (Kenneth) Riley of Grants Pass, Oregon; Mary Joanne (William) McKenney of Mt. Ida, Arkansas; David (Teresa) Hopkins of Kalama, Washington; Juanita (Skip) Beall III of Surprise, Arizona; Ina Jean Pearson of Coco, Florida; Darrell Richardson son-in-law of Tacoma, Washington; Carolyn (Richard) Turner of Homer, Alaska; Bonnie (Earl) Karr of Fernley, Nevada; Dorothy (Joseph) Fry of Des Moines, Washington; Perry R.D. Smith of Tacoma, Washington; former daughter-in-law Joan Smith and Julia (Steve) Pilgrim of Kent, Washington.

Funeral services will be held June 2, 2012 at 3pm at Weeks Dryer Mortuary, 220 134th Street South, Tacoma, Washington 98444. A gathering of family and friends will be held after the service at Gove Masonic Lodge, 3736 South Sheridan, Tacoma, Washington 98418. Donations strongly suggested to your favorite charity.
Pub Date: 5/30/2012 – Tacoma News Tribune

 

[Photo taken 2001 at a Breedlove’s cousin reunion in Renton. – CJW] Ina was my first cousin 2 X removed. We were ‘double cousins’ because her mother Laura Breedlove Pentecost was a sister to my G-grandmother Cerilda Breedlove Yates. We were also cousins through the Pentecost family. My G-Grandmother Mary E. Pentecost was a sister to Ina’s father James Eli Shields Pentecost. (My Grandfather Will K. Yates married his step sister Minnie C. Smith)

© Carol Wilkerson 2012

 

The Old Yates Farm Painted From Memory

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I received a wonderful surprise in the mail a few days ago: a copy of a painting done by my cousin Freeda Prantl Mitts that was given to one of our Yates cousins who lives in Ten Mile, TN, Tooter Yates.

I’ve known about this painting for a few years and off and on had asked for Tooter to take a picture of it and just send it to me via email.  He and Sue are such kind people though that they went the extra mile and too it and had it copied.

I suppose some people would say this painting is rather primitive, but to me it’s priceless. Freeda put in things she remembered of the Yates farm near Brandsville in Howell county, Missouri.  She didn’t paint Jim Yates into the picture though, she made a copy of another picture, cut out his image and inserted it into the painting so it stands out and looks a bit 3D.

Sue related yesterday that the pond was still there on the farm. Jim Yates built that house and we have details about the interior of  it from his daughter Martha Yates Scott’s memoir.

This is the original photo of Jim Yates and his wife Cerilda Breelove Yates along with his sister Myra Yates standing behind them.

The lady who painted the picture is the small girl in the front, Freeda; next to her is her brother “Sport”, and behind left to right are her sisters Fran and Buddy. (Please leave a comment and correct me if I got the names wrong!)

If only Freeda was still alive to tell me what kind of trees she put in the picture, and what kind of tractor that was.  Freed lives on because she shared her memories and kindness with all of us.

The Yates Family Connection To Fruitville Missouri

West Plains High School girls

Torreytown and Col. Jay L. Torrey

Colonel Jay Torrey

From its inception around 1909, Fruitville, near Brandsville in Howell County, Missouri has always been part of our family history.  Col. Torrey was the owner of ten thousand acres in Howell County, and his plan was to sell individual plots of land to those interested in investing $5000.  His vision was to create an idyllic town around which these farms would be located.  Much like a planned community of the modern era, he offered the chance for investors to attain their lifelong dream of health and happiness.

Aunt Martha Yates Scott Worked At Fruitville

In my Great Aunt Martha Yates Scott’s journal she recounts what it was like to work in the kitchen at Fruitville.  She related how the others that worked there were astounded when she was easily capable of lifting and “toting” 50 pound bags of flour needed for each day’s bread they baked for the other workers on the farm.  She didn’t count herself as one of the premier bakers though, and felt that honor should go to my aunt Mirtha, her step-sister.  The red arrow in the picture above indicates the woman I believe is my Aunt Martha.  As you can see, she was a very big ‘girl’.

Will Yates and Fruitville Farm

My grandfather, Will Yates also lived near to, and worked at Fruitville, and I do think he probably was on a local baseball team for the farm.  Will’s father Jim Yates had come to Howell County, Missouri in the 1880’s with his half brother Gideon Morrison as well as his sister Myra Yates.  In 1900 Jim Yates purchased 80 acres near Brandsville and began his farm and lumber mill.  Jim would reside on that land in the Ozarks until around 1937 when his second wife died and he came here to Washington State to live with his children, including Will Yates who moved here in the 20’s when the drought took its toll on southern Missouri.

In letters I have read that were exchanged by Grandpa and his brother-in-law Richard Dewey Moore, Sr., I think the two of them were initial investors in Col. Torrey’s land scheme, but at some point it fell out of favor with them and they paid Torrey back and sought their fortunes elsewhere.

The Demise Of Fruitville, Torreytown and Col. Torrey

If you read through the whole page about Col. Torrey and his life and times, it is quite fascinating to see how this man came to be a land owner in Missouri, his political history and his sad death in 1920.  Make sure you read the excerpt written by Cherie Reavis written in 1979 for the West Plains Quill.  I think that many things happened that resulted in the downfall of Fruitville and Torreytown.  Soon after Col. Torry began we were at war with Germany and personal lives and incomes were uncertain.  Weather patterns changed for a time and new lands and opportunities were opening up in the far west.

Will Yates had already scouted out the west by 1915. As a young man unmarried man of 23 he was a seasoned laborer and had traveled by himself to the Pan Pacific Exposition by train to Oregon and then by boat the rest of the way to San Francisco.  He knew the lumber milling industry from his time at home on his father’s farm and when his second son Guy was about two years old in 1924, Will and his wife  left Howell County to make their new home eventually in Bordeaux, Washington.

6th Edition Smile For The Camera – Funny Bone

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I can’t say this picture necessarily makes me laugh, but it does make me smile :). The man on the left is my Great Grand Uncle James Eli Penecost who was born 28 Jan 1867 in Celina, Clay, TN and died 04 Feb 1941 in Koshkonong, Oregon, MO. The man on the right is my Great Grandfather James William Milburn Yates who was born 27 Sep 1862 in Roane County, TN and died 11 August 1938 in Olympia, Thurston, WA. The two men were brother-in-laws, being married to sisters Laura Breedlove (Jim P’s second wife) and Cerilda Breedlove (Jim Yates’ first wife).

There is no explanation in any of our family documents that would give us a clue why these two men had this picture taken, but just that it exists makes me think the coats they are wearing must have been very important to them. They both were living in Missouri at the time this photo was taken, and it can get mighty cold there in the winter. If I didn’t know for sure who these men were, I would take them for some Russian immigrants, wouldn’t you? Do you think that’s a beaver coat that Jim Pentecost is wearing?

I hope you have enjoyed this submission for 6th Edition Smile For The Camera – “Funny Bone”.  If you would like to participate by blogging about your own picture that makes you smile or laugh, you can do so here’s how:

Deadline for submission is midnight (PT)
10 October, 2008.

HOW TO SUBMIT:

There are two options:

1. Send an email to the host, Becky (kinexxions@gmail.com). Include the title and permalink URL of the post you are submitting, and the name of your blog. Put ‘Smile For The Camera’ clearly in the title of your email!

2. Use the handy submission form (http://blogcarnival.com/bc/submit_4058.html) provided by Blog Carnival.

See you at the Carnival!

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