October 5, 2015

Ina Pentecost Smith 1913-2012

Ina M. Pentecost Hopkins Smith Passed away Friday, May 25th at the age of 98 at St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Tacoma, Washington. Many of her loving family were with her. She was born in Brandsville, Missouri, December 15, 1913.

Ina was the twelfth child of James Eli Shields Pentecost and Laura Francis Breedlove Pentecost. She married Chester (Chet) Lloyd Hopkins January 25, 1930 in Melbourne, Arkansas, where they had three children.

They were having a very difficult time during the Depression and decided to move to Alaska in 1939. When Chet arrived in Alaska he started working for the Alaska Railroad. He and Ina built a house on Nugget Avenue in Spenard, Alaska, where they had three more children.

In 1943 Ina married Roy H. D. Smith, who worked as a foreman for the Alaska Railroad. He and Ina built a three-bedroom home, a triplex, a duplex, and a small, one-bedroom house. The rental business helped supplement his income as they proceeded to have six more children, and enabled Ina to stay home and care for their children. She instilled a strong love of family, faith, and helping others who were less fortunate in all her children.

In 1963, Roy and Ina, with the five youngest children, moved to Tacoma, Washington to live and be able to help take care of his 85-year-old mother. Ina lived 49 years in Tacoma. Ina was always involved in her children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and great-great-grandchildren’s lives. She was the conduit for all information regarding her family and many friends throughout her life. Ina was so very proud of her children. She would frequently state, “I have twelve children, and they’re all natural!” They were all single births too.

She had 33 grandchildren, 58 great-grandchildren, and 29 great-great-grandchildren. She was preceded by husbands Chester Hopkins, Roy R. D. Smith, Gary Kassuth, and Harold Hopkins, son Roy Lee Hopkins, daughter Doris Richardson, granddaughter Lerrina Smith, great-granddaughter Shelcy Diebert, and great-grandson Ayden Beall.

Ina is survived by Ida Elizabeth (Kenneth) Riley of Grants Pass, Oregon; Mary Joanne (William) McKenney of Mt. Ida, Arkansas; David (Teresa) Hopkins of Kalama, Washington; Juanita (Skip) Beall III of Surprise, Arizona; Ina Jean Pearson of Coco, Florida; Darrell Richardson son-in-law of Tacoma, Washington; Carolyn (Richard) Turner of Homer, Alaska; Bonnie (Earl) Karr of Fernley, Nevada; Dorothy (Joseph) Fry of Des Moines, Washington; Perry R.D. Smith of Tacoma, Washington; former daughter-in-law Joan Smith and Julia (Steve) Pilgrim of Kent, Washington.

Funeral services will be held June 2, 2012 at 3pm at Weeks Dryer Mortuary, 220 134th Street South, Tacoma, Washington 98444. A gathering of family and friends will be held after the service at Gove Masonic Lodge, 3736 South Sheridan, Tacoma, Washington 98418. Donations strongly suggested to your favorite charity.
Pub Date: 5/30/2012 – Tacoma News Tribune


[Photo taken 2001 at a Breedlove’s cousin reunion in Renton. – CJW] Ina was my first cousin 2 X removed. We were ‘double cousins’ because her mother Laura Breedlove Pentecost was a sister to my G-grandmother Cerilda Breedlove Yates. We were also cousins through the Pentecost family. My G-Grandmother Mary E. Pentecost was a sister to Ina’s father James Eli Shields Pentecost. (My Grandfather Will K. Yates married his step sister Minnie C. Smith)

© Carol Wilkerson 2012


The Old Yates Farm Painted From Memory

I received a wonderful surprise in the mail a few days ago: a copy of a painting done by my cousin Freeda Prantl Mitts that was given to one of our Yates cousins who lives in Ten Mile, TN, Tooter Yates.

I’ve known about this painting for a few years and off and on had asked for Tooter to take a picture of it and just send it to me via email.  He and Sue are such kind people though that they went the extra mile and too it and had it copied.

I suppose some people would say this painting is rather primitive, but to me it’s priceless. Freeda put in things she remembered of the Yates farm near Brandsville in Howell county, Missouri.  She didn’t paint Jim Yates into the picture though, she made a copy of another picture, cut out his image and inserted it into the painting so it stands out and looks a bit 3D.

Sue related yesterday that the pond was still there on the farm. Jim Yates built that house and we have details about the interior of  it from his daughter Martha Yates Scott’s memoir.

This is the original photo of Jim Yates and his wife Cerilda Breelove Yates along with his sister Myra Yates standing behind them.

The lady who painted the picture is the small girl in the front, Freeda; next to her is her brother “Sport”, and behind left to right are her sisters Fran and Buddy. (Please leave a comment and correct me if I got the names wrong!)

If only Freeda was still alive to tell me what kind of trees she put in the picture, and what kind of tractor that was.  Freed lives on because she shared her memories and kindness with all of us.

Two Upcoming Centenarian Birthdays In Our Family

Two Hundred Years Of Living

We are delighted to say that we’ll have two people in our family turning 100 this year!  First, is my cousin Fran Prantl Harbeston’s widower Herb Harbeston who will turn 100 on May 20th.  Here’s what his son Jack wrote about his father:

“When Herb was born, in 1910, the average life expectancy was 47 years, so he has managed to beat the odds, to put it mildly.  To give you an idea of the changes Herb has seen in 100 years, consider that when he was born women couldn’t vote, there was no social security, no income taxes and no big government.”
“Homesteads of 160 acres were free, you just had to live on the land for five years and improve it.  Transportation was by horse and wagon, and trains.  Herb’s mother, Becky and her sister Millie both homesteaded in the Colombia [River] Basin about 1890.  Becky and her first husband homesteaded a wheat ranch in the Palouse, near Pullman.  Becky had to give up the homestead when her husband contracted TB, and went back home to Brandsville, Missouri, to die.  Millie settled south of Quincy, near what is now I-90, and eventually moved to Vantage where her husband operated the ferry across the Columbia River.”

“In 1932, with a wife and child, and another on the way, with no vocational skills and an unemployment rate pushing 50%, Herb migrated to Washington, staying first with Millie, and then a series of farms, which included herding sheep.  That was nearly 80 years ago. ”

May 2000 Birthday Gathering

Ten years ago (has it really been that long?) we all gathered together for a celebration of Herb’s 90th birthday, along with his sister-in-law Tracy Prantl Richardson‘s 86th.  Tracy passed away in 2007, and she is missed by all who knew her.


Opal Breedlove Hudson

Our other centenarian is my cousin Opal Breedlove Hudson who resides out on the Washington coast in an assisted living facility.  Opal is the daughter of  Sarah Ellenor (Forrest) and Thomas John BREEDLOVE.  She was born in July of 191o near Brandsville, Missouri.  I hope to attend the celebration for Opal this year too.  We’re waiting for more definite details on dates and location.


Allene Moore Chapin 1915 – 2010 Newspaper Woman

Her brother Dick Moore called her Mary Allene, but when she and I first began to share family information she instructed me to call her Allene.  Allene will always be thought of in my mind as one of those “grand gals” with spirit and the spunk to speak her mind.  Sadly, I never got to meet her in person, but we had many spirited phone calls, during one of which she told me my voice sounded like my Grandma Minnie.

Allene was one of the few cousins I could talk to about grandma who knew her as their aunt.  Allene was one of those people who would make you feel like family from the first moment you met.  No fussing around, just come on in and sit a spell.  I loved to listen to her speak with that fine Missouri sing-song twang I remember so well from my Grandpa Will Yates and his side of the family.

As one of the founding members of the Ozark Spring Chapter of the DAR, Allene was instrumental in having me join their ranks.  It was for sentimental reasons that I joined that chapter instead of one here in Washington state.  Allene wanted to be one of the ladies who signed my application for membership as a tribute to my grandmother.  As it turned out, I wasn’t able to join through her Patriot because there needed to be more documentation, but I was able to tell her of a few “new” ones, including my

Captain Thomas Poindexter


When I said “spirited” to describe Allene it was our conversation about the “Oglethorpes” that I remembered.  Many years ago Allene, Pauline Pond, and Ruth Dixon put together a family tree of sorts from what they knew and remembered hearing from their ancestors.  When I began looking for my ‘Oglethorpes’ in Clay, Overton and Jackson, Tennessee I soon found out that there were no Oglethorpes of any kind there.  What was there were the Osgatharps and they had been in that part of Tennessee for generations.  I had to send her tangible proof of the family name so she would believe me! Once she had that though, and found that our line connected to Richard Osgatharp/Osgathorpe who had served in the American Revolution, she was accepting of the name change.

A wonderful lady has passed from our midst, but she will never be forgotten. Even if you don’t know her I hope that you will take a few minutes to read her obituary by her son that was extremely well written . I’m adding the two pages as thumbnails. Please click on them till you get them to the size to make them more easily read.

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Rest in Peace Allene

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