December 18, 2014

Second Marriage Record Might Reveal Original Swedish Surname

1925 Moline - Skagerlind marriage, cropped

Since I’ve been researching my Swedish family of Moline, I’ve always known that John (Johan) Emil Moline was the son of Lars Petter Molin(e).  But, following some Swedish naming customs, Johan Emil Moline might have come to this country under the surname Larson.

This is when documenting each step really gets important. I have the original Moline family bible pages that belonged to John Emil Moline. There is no mention of the surname Larson on any of the pages. So, what makes me think great grandpa was a Larson at some point?

Today, as I was searching for the date of my Great Grandpa Moline’s second marriage to Hannah W. Skagerlind in the Washington State Digital Archives, the marriage license I found stated the witnesses were Axel and his wife (no first name given for her) LARSON.  The date was 19 August 1925.

Was Axel just visiting Washington to attend the wedding and be a witness? My great grandfather did have a brother named Axel Linus Moline. Was this Axel Larson a relative…perhaps a cousin? John Emil Moline did have another brother in the United States: Fridolf Ferdinand Moline who, until 1920, was residing in St. Paul, Minnesota. Fridolf later moved to Indiana.

Right now, one thing is for sure: John Emil Moline married the second time to Hannah Skagerlind in 1925.  Only time will tell who Axel Larson was!

1925 Moline - Skagerlind marriage, cropped

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – Remember When?

1) Remember when you were 12 years old? On a summer day out of school? What memory do you have of fun activities?

2) Tell us about that memory (just one – you can do more later if you want to) in a blog post, in a comment to this post, or in a comment on Facebook.

Here’s my memory:

We lived out in the country, so when I would wake up on a summer morning the sunlight would be streaming in my window.  I could hear the sounds outside of birds like robins, crows and sometimes even a pheasant. If I heard a whistle blow in the distance, I’d know it was 8 AM because that was the starting time at the Olympia Brewery up on Capitol Boulevard some three or four miles away.

As I lay there I could hear my mom in the kitchen and I would visualize what she was doing just by listening: making coffee, turning on the radio,  running water in the sink, and then she’d sit down to have a cigarette and read the paper. Mom always liked to lay the paper out on the table. 

In the “good old days” I was always ready to get out of bed, set and ready for the day’s adventure, whatever it might be.  Some days in summer we would ride our bikes down to Palermo Valley to pick strawberries; other days we’d hang around the house and complain about how hot it was.  I think I probably ate more strawberries than I picked.  A big “no-no” if you got caught by the row boss!  No straddling the rows either. You might stomp on a good pickin’ berry.

My friend Mary and I might have the day planned to ride down to Falls Park by the old Olympia Brewery. We’d walk the whole trail, and I remember one time we got all daring and actually went out on the huge flat rocks in the middle of the Deshutes River.  It was like a whole other world sitting on the sun-warmed rock listening to the river roaring by and craning our necks to see if we could see any fish.

On our way home, if we had any money with us, we’d stop at Ted’s Grocery in Tumwater to get a Pepsi or some ice cream.  Our time was set by the brewery whistle:  the morning whistle I mentioned; the noon whistle so we knew to get our behinds home for lunch if we wanted any; and the 5 o’clock whistle that told us to get on our bikes and get home because Dad got off work at five and we needed to get home and cleaned up for dinner.

Thanks to Randy Seaver at Genea-Musings for this fun Saturday night post idea.  Why not click on the link and go see what he wrote about?

Carnival of Genealogy – 57th Edition “I read it in the news!”

Technically, I didn’t read this article in the news since it happened about nine years before I was born, but it was in the Daily Olympian newspaper in 1941. As the caretaker of the family documents and pictures, this article was one of a few about our family that made the news.

Dad never “won” anything in his life before or after the draft. Lucky him, huh? [As it turns out, the date of July 19th is important in our Yates/Wilkerson family. My cousin Linda Yates was born on that day in 1950, and our granddaughter Katrina was born on that day in 2001. :) ]


William Gale Yates 1920-1996

In 1941 his draft registration number (169) was chosen as #1 in Thurston county, WA, and rather than be drafted, he joined the Navy. He went to basic training in San Diego and then was sent to Kaneohe Bay on Oahu after the Pearl Harbor attack. The unit was then divided by alphabet, and the first half was sent to serve on the Saratoga, and the second half was sent to New Caledonia in the Loyalty Islands.  During his time in the Navy, Gale was certified as a Seaman Second Class on the 23rd of Feb. 1942 and completed a course of study at Aviation Machinist’s Mates’ School at US Naval Air Station, Seattle, WA.

One of the ships he was transported on was the USS Dixie. During this time in the war, probably when he was in New Caledonia, View Larger Map Gale had occasion to strap “Ol’ Bull Halsey into his parachute”.  Dad always thought that was pretty cool. :) The plane in the article above I believe is an F4F Grumman Wildcat.

 

New Here? Want to join us and write your own article like this? Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy using the carnival submission form (http://blogcarnival.com/bc/submit_346.html). Past posts and future hosts can be found on the blog carnival index page (http://blogcarnival.com/bc/cprof_346.html).  Love genealogy? Come and meet a great group of people on Facebook at Genea-Bloggers.

MyFamily Confusion With Old And New Sites

MyFamily choices

MyFamily button

Years ago, when I first subscribed to Ancestry, they had free MyFamily sites. I had two of them in those days: Yates and Allied Families, and Wilkerson and Allied Families.  I happily added tons of census records, photos, and any other sundry that pertained to our history.

Then, MyFamily decided this was a pretty lucrative deal and they began charging for what initially had been free.  Their sweetened offer now though was more storage space, so I signed on at $29.95 a year for both sites. Generous family members chipped in, and we continued on for a few more years.  This seemed like a good way to create a ‘repository’ of sorts for each group’s records. More than once my cousins and Jim’s were able to recover pictures when their computer’s failed them.

Skip ahead to present day. I had let my subscriptions lapse when I knew that our income would be tighter after Jim retired. The sites were still there, but ‘dormant’. Recently, since I had some new information and contacts, I created a new site named Old Bordeaux Washington in tribute to the little logging town in which my parents had grown up.  As a paid site, it has its own site address, making it much easier to find.

Admittedly, I’m not the sharpest knife in the bulb drawer, but it is is almost infuriatingly complicated to have TWO MyFamily ‘generation’ choices:

MyFamily choices

Even if I have paid and free sites, and old and new ones, I would just like to be able to universally login to them all! Is that too much to ask? No, but in order to do so I have to migrate my old sites to the new format. Granted, not impossible, but definitely tiresome. Oh, and I have to admit, I am just a teensy bit scared of doing it because I’m afraid if I try it I’ll lose all the info on the old sites.  Whoever said doing genealogy was easy?

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