December 19, 2014

Richard Lemuel Bean Migration: VT, MI and Iowa 1808 – 1869

Cornwall-Massena map

Richard Lemuel Bean, son of Lemuel (S? or L?) Bean and unknown mother was born Birth 5 January 1808 in Windsor, Windsor, VT and his Death 16 Jan 1869 in Nashua, Chickasaw, IA

Richard married in 1833 to Sarah Cook whose Birth 04 Apr 1812 in Cornwall, ON, Canada ; her death 01 Aug 1895 in Nashua, Chickasaw, IA

In 1840 the family was living in Massena, St. Lawrence, NY and continued to live in that area until around 1849/50. This is evidenced by the birth locations of the first six children with the exception of Holton Bean who was born in Canada. It can only be speculated on why he might have been born there, but his mother was from Cornwall, Ontario, Canada which is located just across the St. Lawrence River from Massena, NY. Reasonable possibilities could be that because of winter time weather in that part of New York his mother might have been visiting her family in Canada when it was time for her son to be born, or that she was coincidentally there for some other reason.

In 1850, the Bean family was living in a completely different location: Woodhull township, Shiawassee, MI. Richard L. Bean and family is making his living as a farmer.

In 1860 the family had moved again, this time to their final destination, in Nashua, Chickasaw, IA where the last three children, Lemuel, Helen Jane and Andrew Bean were born.

Look For The Children, Find The Parents

Cornwall-Massena map

It was just by a little reverse sleuthing that I found Richard L. Bean and family in the 1850 census. I was searching the census for each child down the line chronologically and found Holton Bean with his parents in Michigan. As it turned out, the census taker had list the family as Richard, R L instead of as it should have been Bean, Richard L. Another instance that made it hard to find the family in that year was that the listing for them was at the bottom of the census page, with three of the children listed at the top of the following page. This is an important thing to keep in mind. Always try to find the children if you can’t find the parents.  

 

The Yates Family Lived In These States

The Yates Family Lived In These States
Make yours @ BigHugeLabs.com
Make yours @ BigHugeLabs.com
First Generation Yates
The line (so far) is traced to Roane County, TN and begins there with Miles Yates who married Debby Holmes there in 1840.
Second Generation
Son James Knox Polk Yates stayed in Roane County, but two of his children by his first wife, James William Milburn and Myra Yates migrated to Missouri with the Morrison family.
Third Generation
Jim Yates married Cerilda Breedlove in Missouri and at least one of their children moved to Oklahoma.  Almost all of the other Yates children migrated to Washington state to jobs connected to the lumber industry. They include: Lem, Elizabeth, Rhoda, Lydia, Will, and Martha.
Fourth Generation
One of Jim’s daughters, Cerilda, moved to California where she passed away. Son Will’s family (Gale, Guy and Waldo) stayed in Washington. (Guy passed away in 1938 in WA state).  Waldo (Wally) then migrated to Oregon for a short time and then settled in California.
This is a short snapshot of the Yates family migration from 1840 to the Present.

Genealogy Comes Naturally To Heirloom Gardeners

Flowering Almond 2007

The Story Behind The Plant In This Photo

(continued from Pentimento blog post How To Propagate A Flowering Almond Shrub)

The flowering almond above is a ‘child’ of a plant that was already well-established in our yard way back in the 1950’s.  That was in Tumwater, Washington and the house was an old farmhouse with many old trees, shrubs and flower bulbs planted everywhere.  My brother and I, along with our parents lived in that house from about 1952 to 1982 when my parents moved to live with my grandpa in Olympia.  In that year my sister-in-law Kathy got a start from the Dennis Street flowering almond as did my mom get one to plant at my grandpa’s place.  I chose not to get a start off the plant at that time, even though I was living in Washington too, and as it turned out we moved to Florida for four years and came back in 1992.

It was just a few years ago that I decided I finally had a place to plant a start of the family flowering almond.  It makes me smile to think about the original one from my childhood that always heralded spring with its pretty pink blossoms all along the stems and how it’s not just people who “migrate” but they also take their plants with them!

Did any of your ancestors bring plants with them when they migrated?


Discover

Our Ancestor’s Moving Experiences

While we were on our vacation to California we stopped in Oroville to visit my aunt and uncle and do a little sight-seeing. We did the former, but not the latter. One of the places I would have liked to have seen was the Pioneer History Museum but we ran out of time in the two days we were there.

We really wanted to see the museum because Jim’s great-great grandfather Joshua Wilkerson was one of the 1849 miners who came to that area and found gold.  We really always wish we could find a picture of him as a young man, but finding that would be like finding gold wouldn’t it? :)

Even though we missed that destination, as we rode along those thousands of miles I began thinking of just how our ancestors moved all their things for those same distances.  I know, we all think of those pioneers on the Oregon Trail and how they had to dump some of their precious belongings along the trail, but what about later, before moving boxes and supplies in our present era?

I know people had trunks and probably wooden boxes to safeguard their treasures, but it might surprise you to know that cardboard boxes came into their own as early as 1874, when G. Smyth built the first single sided corrugated board-making machine. Also in 1874, Oliver Long improved upon the Jones patent and invented a lined corrugated cardboard.

While it may have been some time before cardboard boxes were widely used, it’s intriguing that the invention has been around for that long, isn’t it? Do you own any old trunks or boxes from earlier times?

Source:

History of Papermaking

The invention of paper and the history of papermaking machinery.

By , About.com Guide

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