August 27, 2015

Was It Eleanor Jeane Or Jeane Eleanor Moline?

EasyCanvasPrintslogo

Legal Names and Family Names

L-R: Donald, Helen, Joan, Jeane; on floor: Joyce Moline

It’s always been a puzzle to me just what my aunt Jeane’s first name was legally. Was it Eleanor Jeane Moline as it was noted in my Nordgren great grandfather’s bible page, or was it Jeane Eleanor Moline as her son Lee and the rest of the family always thought it to be?

I’m hoping that in a week or so that mystery will be put to rest. Today I ordered her birth certificate from the State of Washington and hopefully they will find the right record (nope, no refunds) and put this issue to rest.  In my opinion, it wasn’t inexpensive to order the birth record at $31.50 a pop, but having documentation that proves a name is vital.

I suppose I have a special affinity for my aunt Jeane since I was named after her (my middle name) because my mom was very close to her. She and my uncle Jim Davis named their first born after my dad’s middle name (Dad was William Gale Yates) and chose Leland Gale.  Jeane and Jim’s daughter was named after my mom and her name is Lynne Joanne Davis.


Next post: A review of a photo to canvas print of my grandma Helen Nordgren Moline by Easy Canvas Prints.

Moline Family Home – Seattle 1942 and 1986

Moline house Seattle1942

 

The Moline House on Queen Anne Hill

There’s no date written on this newspaper clipping, so I will have to estimate it was written some time around 1942.  I surmise that by knowing that my grandparents, “Al” and Eppie (Epstein) Moline, left their previous residence in Bordeaux, Washington when the mill there closed in 1941.

War was imminent, but it may have been a boom time for my grandfather who was a lumber salesman her in the Pacific Northwest.  Lumber was still in high demand for the war machine that was being called into action as World War II began.  PT boats especially, were large consumers of engineered wood. Grandpa had his own lumber company whose name, appropriately enough, was E. B. Moline Lumber Company.

The Marriage Spot

My mom was just eighteen in 1941.  She lived in this house with her parents all during the war years.  On February 5, 1944 my parents were married in this room, in front of this fireplace.

 

You Can Go Home Again

In about 1985 my mother and I made a pilgrimage to this house so she could show me where they had lived.  Miracles of miracles, when we reached the house they owners were having some remodeling done in the upstairs bath (a jacuzzi tub was being hoisted through the bathroom window when we arrived!) and since the house was pretty ‘wide open’ to the workmen anyway, we were allowed to tour a few of the rooms.

Mom was thrilled to be able to show me her room upstairs and tell me what it was like to live there.  I think it especially pleased her to show me the living room and fireplace where she and Dad were wed.  I was totally taken by the sunroom just off the living room, but she let me in on a little backstory: her step mother didn’t like that room much because it would get so hot at certain times of the year.

I can just imagine my grandparents hosting parties and playing bridge in this house.  Eppie was an RN and had worked at Swedish hospital before she married Grandpa.  She had also worked as a private nurse at one time for Mrs. Silverstone whose husband Emmanuel (Manny) was the district manager for the Crescent Spice Company.

1951 Hawaiian Passenger List – Elvin and Lillian Moline

A Seattle Adventure With Mom

 

Do You Have Favorite Family Members?

Minnie Smith age 12

Are there favorite family members you like to research or write about?  Until someone else posed this question, I hadn’t really given it much thought just who I seemed to write about the most.  I think about several of my ancestors quite often though, and wish that I could have met them.

Minnie Smith Yates

I’ve written about my two grandmothers before in Growing Up Grandma-less where I explain how much you lose when you never get to know your grandmother.  I think about my Grandma Minnie Yates quite often, especially now that I have two granddaughters of my own. What would I have learned from her? I wonder…

Donald, Helen, Joan, Jeane and Joyce Moline

My maternal grandmother, Helen Nordgren Moline, had a very short life, but she left us with a mystery.  Well, several mysteries.  She was killed by a hit and run driver as she stood on a corner in Seattle in September of 1929.  At the time, she was already living away from her husband, two adopted children and three biological daughters.

In 1930 Grandpa Moline and the three girls are living with another young woman in the house, presumably the adopted daughter.  But where was the adopted son Donald Moline?  And, why two adopted children when they had three girls? Did Grandpa want a boy so bad to carry on his name that he wanted Grandma to keep having babies till she ‘gave him one’, and when she had my mother, the youngest and another girl, did they decide to adopt?

~~~

There are plenty more people for favorites in Jim’s family too:

Henry Skaggs, one of the “long hunters” who ( I was told) had an unnatural relationship with his granddaughters.  He’s not my favorites because of that, just the long hunter part because he was one of the pioneers who went into Kentucky with men such as Daniel Boone.

My husband Jim is a descendant of Henry Skaggs through Henry’s marriage to Susan Scott. Their daughter Nancy Skaggs married Peter DeSpain. Of that union a son, John DeSpain married (3) Mariah Perkins. John and Mariah’s daughter Mary Elizabeth DeSpain married John W. Whitmore, a Medal of Honor recipient in the Civil War. The DeSpain and Whitmore families settled in Des Moines County near Pleasant Grove, Iowa.  Peter DeSpain and Nancy Skaggs had 19 children.  I know she probably had no choice, but I sure admire that woman!

Mariah Perkins DeSpain

Who are your favorite ancestors? Let me know by leaving a comment, please.

Preserving Past Family Home Locations With Google Street View

1105 Spring Street

Sentimental Sunday

If you read the title of this article, it might be a bit misleading in that I was able to get the photo below with just Google. I did use SnagIt (which I LOVE!) too to capture the image.  I am not real adept at using Google with SnagIt,  so that’s why you see that silly magnifying glass thing in the picture.  Google presents the opportunity by supplying the street view; SnagIt makes it easy to capture.  No doubt there are other ways.

My Grandpa Elvin “Al” and Grandma Lillian “Eppy” (Epstein)  Moline lived on the second floor in this building probably from the 1950’s to the late ’60’s.  The address is 1105 Spring Street, Seattle, WA.  I think it’s called the Decatur Condos now.  They had the apartment at the bottom of the photo, which included the small balcony.  Grandma was a sun worshiper, so no doubt she was delighted to have a way to get outside.  Their apartment was a corner one, so the three windows from left to right shows the size of their one bedroom abode.

The far left window was their bedroom whose window was really a cool patio door that opened to the balcony. In the middle was the living room, and I think one side of those windows might have opened to the balcony also.  The kitchen windows are last to the right of the three.  My brother has the drop leaf table that used to sit in front of  the kitchen window.

This apartment had an effect on me I can’t quite explain.  We lived in an old farmhouse in Tumwater.  This apartment was the opposite side of the coin and seemed very posh to me.  A couch on one wall in the living room, and two club chairs with a beautiful wooden secretary faced it from the opposite wall.  There were nice paintings on the walls and tasteful knick knacks scattered here and their, but not overdone.  Grandpa Molines’s father was a furniture maker, so I suppose an appreciation for fine furniture rubbed off on him.  Grandma (she was my mom’s step mother) was a bridge player and a registered nurse, so she was very social and was used to being with people all the time, from all walks of life.  Some of the jokes she told would make you blush.

Last, but not least, was one more attraction for Dave and I when we visited the grandparents in this building.  We were always pumped to get in the elevator and ride to…the second floor.  That was pretty anticlimatic, so we would beg Mom to let us go “exploring”.   We made a beeline right for the elevator and rode it up and down lots of times before we saw the same people more than once.  They gave us the “eye” and we knew we had to give up our fun before someone reported us to the office.  We never once did anything destructive or even thought to do that.  We were just kids out of our element. Good times! Good memories!

 

© 2007-2015 iPentimento|Genealogy and History All Rights Reserved -- Copyright notice by Blog Copyright