December 22, 2014

What Does It Look Like When Google+ And Pinterest Get Married?

A Marriage Made in Cyberspace
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This is what Google+ looks like when it’s paired with a Pinterest-type look. I always find that images draw me in 100 times more often than anything else. Pinterest is hot and it doesn’t look like it’s going to cool off anytime soon. So hot that now everyone is finding a way to emulate it. I’ve just looked at my own Google+ pages (friends, genealogists, etc..) and I really think it’s going to be much easier to find items of interest, but I will say that images are going to be key in attracting readers.
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8 Places To Share Your Social Profile

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Social Media Icons

Let’s Get Social!

Depending on your intent, you might want to add your social profile to any or all of these sites. Some are well known, but if you’re just getting started online these links will make it easy for you to get your social presence “out there” initially. This is a random list and not presented by any personal preference.

Write Your Profile First!

 Write your profile first and keep it in a file on your computer for quick access so you can upload it with just a few keystrokes. You might want to add a paragraph for inclusion to personalize it for the site, or type of site, to which you are uploading it. What you upload to Facebook might not quite be the same as what you would like someone on a photo type site to know about you.

Facebook – Almost everyone online has a Facebook profile. I would caution that you only include just the information you are most comfortable in sharing with the whole world. As an added help, you might want to use Social Fixer to whichever browser you are using.

Twitter – If you are planning to just have a social presence on Twitter, there is probably not much need to have more than one account. If you want to keep your business and social lives separate though, then I would suggest at least two accounts. The way to have two accounts is simple, just create each one with a different email account that you own.

LinkedIn – Whether you are in business or not, LinkedIn is an excellent site in which to make like-minded friends and have the ability to gain authority and a trusted social presence through joining specific interest groups and/or giving and receiving endorsements.

About.me – About.me has the ability to put all of your online presences in one location via badges for the other sites I’m listing. Kind of a central hub for your fans.

Google+ – If you have a blog, it’s great to have Google know that, and one of the best ways is through Google Authorship.

YouTube – Are you doing webinars, lectures, etc., or creating fun videos you would like to share? Having your profile on YouTube will make it so people can find them by looking for your ‘handle’, name, interest or topic.

Instagram – Wild about sharing your photos with the world? Adding Instagram to your smart device, or sharing through an account on your PC is also a way to catch and keep your reader’s interests. They can subscribe to your account and get updates as they choose.

Flickr – Flickr is another photo sharing site that can be used as a free member with limited uploads, or as a paid member for more flexibility. As a site that hosts your photos it’s good in that you can easily access all of them. The downside (to me) is that putting them all in one place online is like putting all your eggs in one basket. If their website goes down for any reason you are left with no way to get a photo you want. Personally, I have my photos in several places, but that’s just my personal preference.

 

 

Elyse Doerflinger on Genealogical Organizational Skills

Quite some time back, in the mid-1990’s I began my serious genealogical research on my families and even though I tried to be organized it’s easy for it to get out of hand. Elyse has presented a 7 minute video and how to get organized, and if you are just beginning genealogy, or are über experienced, it’s worthwhile information that she presents. After a few seconds you can skip the promo ad.

You can also find Elyse at Elyse’s Genealogy Blog. Enjoy!

 

 

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How To Use Genealogy Criteria To Improve Your General Communication Skills

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Make Yourself Understood

When I first began doing genealogical research I was participating in online message boards and mailing lists. One of the things that really became apparent to me early on was that I needed to be specific to make myself understood for the best communication results.

For instance, if I was in a chat room it was imperative to say for whom I was looking, where they had lived and what time frame. Subject lines needed to include surname, location, and possible years, etc.: “YATES, Roane, TN 1840-1918” is one example. On message boards and mailing lists, it was much the same, but I could also include more in-depth information such as collateral names, etc.

Who, Why, What, When and Where

I’ve noticed in this era of shortened messages via Twitter or texting, many people don’t make themselves specific enough when speaking verbally to one another. I know they are trying to be expeditious and get their thoughts out while they have them fresh in their minds, but really, you are short changing yourself and your listener to leave out some facts. The “who, why, what, when, where” of old should always apply.

So, if you are speaking to someone, even if it not about genealogy, make sure you include whom you are speaking of, the location you are citing, and give some sort of time frame at the very least. Example: “When I was in Howell County, Missouri in 1972 I didn’t get to see any of my Yates, Pentecost or Smith cousins because we were just passing through West Plains and I was just picking up a postcard for my grandpa Will Yates who was then living in Washington State, but was born in the Brandsville area.”

Many times, my conversations with family and friends just leave me more confused as they jump from one person to another. It might be their style of conversation, but my advice is, Slow Down and think about what the other person might be hearing. If you get to the end of your story and people look puzzled, or need to ask for clarification, you need to spend extra time thinking about how you present your thoughts.

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