August 1, 2015

1912 Washington State Gun Fanatics

George Martin, Will Yates, , Lem Yates

Gun Fanaticism Or Just Practicality?

Admittedly, I don’t really know what these men really felt about their guns and how ‘fanatical’ they might have been about using them. Anything I say here about them comes from my own views of how my family used their rifles, how they talked about them, and our family history with guns.

First, a little background on the people in this picture and where it was taken. From left to right is George Martin, obviously older than the other men in the picture. Next is William K Yates (my paternal grandfather, age 20), unknown man, and far right is Will Yates’ older brother Lemuel W Yates (age 25). On the back of this picture postcard is the postmark of “July 6, 1912 Union Mills, Washington.” I suppose it’s possible that the picture was taken somewhere else and then made into a postcard sent from Washington.

George Martin, Will Yates, , Lem Yates

All that said, I do believe it was taken near Union Mills, WA. I’m not showing the back of the postcard here, but I do have the original and it has been clipped along the edges, and the original message on the postcard was written in pencil and is now so light after 115 years I’m unable to read it. Union Mills, Washington was located in Thurston County near what is now the town of Lacey and was base for the Union Lumber Company.

Union Lumber Co. History

Source: Encyclopedia of Western Railroad History: Oregon, Washington

 By Donald B. Robertson

So, were they fanatics about their guns? I think they were in the sense that they felt they were a invaluable tool which they could always use to hunt game to feed their families. Or, at least supplement the larder at home. Considering there were no freezers of size at the time I assume they would dress their game in the woods if it was large like a deer, perhaps cutting it in smaller sections to be shared as they saw fit, and much of it eaten immediately. In this picture, I don’t think the men were actively hunting, but rather ‘posing’ for the photographer to make it look like an interesting tableau. The reason I say that is because it was probably taken and sent in July as the postmark indicates, and hunting season wasn’t until much later in the fall.

One thing I do know from my family history with my dad, “Never touch my gun” was law in our house and neither my brother nor I ever considered going against that edict. The men in my family (none of the women hunted, as far as I know) were fanatics about gun safety. I don’t think any of the hunters in the family ever used pistols because it just wouldn’t have been practical for their needs. I do know that when my dad hunted in he used a .30-06. I wonder what happened to that rifle. I bet my brother has it.

 

100 Years Ago Today WA Women Won The Right To Vote

Womens vote 1910

Washington State Historical Society Photo

HeraldNet.com – Local news: How Washington women won the right to vote.

I’ve always exercised my right to vote since I was old enough to do so, but I so admire the women who stood up and fought to get their equal say at the ballot box here in our state.  Washington (caucasian) women were fully ten years ahead of the rest of the nation, and I suspect that at least my Moline and Nordgren grandmothers were fully on-board when the right was granted.

 

 

A Festival of Postcards: Wheels

will-yates-1909-front-back-card

will-yates-1909-front-back-card

Jim and I are going out of town for a few days on a car trip, so I want to leave you with a recent post. I’m participating in a genealogy carnival A Festival of Postcards, with the topic this time of “wheels”. You may not see many actual wheels in this picture, but it was taken in Springfield, Missouri in 1909 when my Grandfather Will Yates was just a young man. That’s him on the far right with the white neckerchief around his neck.

will-yates-1909-mo-back-of-card

I believe this picture was taken at a railroad repair yard (hence, the wheels connection).  Grandpa was writing to his father Jim Yates in West Plains, Missouri and the short note reads, “Hello how are you all down there? How is the corn. Write to me. W. Yates”.

This photo is special to our family because it is the earliest one we have of Grandpa Will. I have never seen any baby or childhood pictures of him, but times were tough and our family wasn’t anywhere near wealthy. Grandpa was born March 14, 1892, so he would have been around 17 years old when this picture was taken. That may seem young now to be out working, but I bet he had been working for a few years (or all of his life in some way) even before that.

will-k-yates-as-a-young-man

The above photo was taken around the same time. Looks pretty dapper, doesn’t he? For a little added “wheels” the photo below is my dad at age two in the car they rode in when the family came to Washington state. Take note: There was no windshield on the car in this picture, or for that road trip either. Grandma must have been a saint!

wg-yates-1922-with-truck

Genealogy Tracking: Wilkersons, Whitmores and L. Frank Boyd – Part 3


As I stated in Genealogy Tracking: Wilkersons, Whitmores and L. Frank Boyd – Part 2 our genealogy research led us to L. Frank Boyd, my husband’s 1st cousin, four times removed. Jim’s cousin Trish gave us copies of records that she had about Louis, which included a letter written by him in 1914 to Jim and Trish’s shared ancestor, John Whitmore.

~~~~~~

Louis Frank Boyd was born 23 May 1859 in Keokuck, Iowa to parents Rebecca (Miller) and Jacob Mackley Boyd. At the age of 18 months, Louis’ mother Rebecca died and he was sent to live with his aunt in Illinois. At the age of thirteen, Louis went to live with his father who had a homestead where Baker City, Oregon now stands.

Louis Boyd was educated at the Baker City Academy and Willamette University, and subsequently learned the trade of printer. After completing his education, Louis moved to Walla Walla, Washington where he began working in the office of the Walla Walla Watchman, and after a short length of time became part owner in that publication. Afterwards, he started the Sunday Epigram and was its editor and manager for sometime. While at Walla Walla, he joined the state militia and was a member of Battery A where he was elected Second Lieutenant.

In May, 1887, he moved to Colfax and edited the Palouse [pronounced PA-Loose] Gazette until November of that year when he went to Olympia, Washington and was elected enrolling clerk of the state senate for that session. In October, 1888, he went to Spokane to accept a position as a reporter on the Review, but before the year had passed he became city editor, a situation he retained for many years.

In 1892 Louis received from Washington Governor Ferry an appointment on his staff as lieutenant colonel, a rank that he held for four years. He was always referred to as Col. Boyd thereafter.

In 1896, he was elected Spokane city clerk, a position he held for many years, as written in his biography in the Illustrated History of Spokane County, Washington; Lever, 1900. Also in 1896 he became inspector of rifle practice in the First Cavalry Battalion. During his time in the battalion he became a tireless student of military tactics.

Louis Frank Boyd, Washington State Representative, 1914 Spokane

L. Frank Boyd introduces legislation for WA voters to register at polls 1914

It is a sad note that apparently Frank was never able to speak to his first cousin John Whitmore again in this lifetime. As I noted in my biography of John, he died in 1913, so his visit to see Frank was no doubt disappointing to them both. As you can read in his letter, Frank was sick when John came to visit and may not have remembered much about it at all. Click on the thumbnail to see the image full-sized.

L. Frank Boyd letter written 1914 to his cousin John Whitmore

Even though there was a difference in ages, Frank born in 1859, and John born in 1844, it is likely that John shared his Civil War experiences with Frank, and therefore it might have been one of the reasons for his intense interest in military tactics. As you remember, John was a Medal of Honor recipient in that war, and no doubt his capturing a flag from the Confederate side at Ft. Blakely, Alabama during a battle, was surely something Frank admired about his cousin.

Portions of this article were extracted from Louis Frank Boyd’s biography in the Illustrated History of Spokane County, Washington; Lever, 1900; page 420. I would be happy to provide any documentation that is in my possession to anyone researching these families. Please ask permission to reprint or use this article.

© CJW 2008

© 2007-2015 iPentimento|Genealogy and History All Rights Reserved -- Copyright notice by Blog Copyright