November 30, 2015

Google Books gets fair use win from federal appeals panel

Google has been given a victory in federal appeals court that will allow the tech giant to go forward with a project that has so far digitized and indexed more than 20.7 million books in the last decade. The 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals in New York ruled on Friday morning that the Google Books project… [Read more…]


Native American Nations map

I have to admit, I’m still in awe of these Tribal Nations Maps created by Aaron Carapella. It was certainly a labor of love on his part as he set out to educate us all regarding the traditional and Native American names for themselves, and the locations where the tribes lived.

It was long ago, when I first read the Clan of the Cave Bear series of books, that I had sort of an epiphany about how I was seeing Native Americans through the eyes of modern cinema, books, and adulterated history fed to us so that we would think of Indians as “wild” or uncivilized. In my opinion you need to really see them all as ‘first peoples’ who came to North America as early as 16 thousand years ago. We’re still learning, still discovering the migration patterns of these ancient ancestors and it’s important to honor them for their survival skills, their understanding of the power of our planet and stop stereotyping them in our consciousness.

I’m still learning, and Aaron’s Tribal Nations maps can help us all see the real history of Native Americans.

NOVEMBER IS NATIVE AMERICAN MONTH – US, Mexico and Canada Tribal maps (24×36) are only $20 ! Use code: 20deal at checkout ! For 30% off on all other maps, use 30off
One shipping charge no matter how many maps you buy!


Not an affiliate or compensated post

Family travel five: Explore patriots’ sacrifices at military museums

Our nation’s veteran and military museums provide a window into an important aspect of our collective history. Here are five places where you and your family can learn about the lives, experiences and resources available to those who serve: 1. The National Museum of the Marine Corps, Quantico, Va. Top-notch technology and interactive exhibits combine to… [Read more…]

How computers broke science – and what we can do to fix it

Ben Marwick, University of Washington Reproducibility is one of the cornerstones of science. Made popular by British scientist Robert Boyle in the 1660s, the idea is that a discovery should be reproducible before being accepted as scientific knowledge. In essence, you should be able to produce the same results I did if you follow the method… [Read more…]