May 23, 2015

Happy Pi Day Birthday Will Knox Yates

William Knox and Minnie Caroline Smith Yates_0

Cerilda, Myra & Jim Yates

One hundred and twenty-three years ago today, a second baby boy was born to Jim and Cerilda Breedlove Yates in Oregon County, Missouri. His name was William Knox Yates and he was my grandfather. (Cerilda and Jim Yates are seated; Jim’s sister Myra is standing).

I don’t have any pictures of my grandpa Yates as a small boy. I think the earliest one I have is the hunting photo I posted (see link below), and I think Grandpa was around 20 years old. Two years later Grandpa would be inducted into the Army artillery at Ft. Dodge, Iowa and sent off to France for WWI service. I don’t have any pictures of him in uniform.

1912 Washington State Gun Fanatics

will-k-yates-as-a-young-man

When Grandpa came back from service overseas, everyone in the family was worried that he might have brought home the Spanish Flu (he didn’t). He and my grandma Minnie Smith married 29 June 1917, most likely when Will came home from the war.

William Knox and Minnie Caroline Smith Yates_0

Their first child, William Gale Yates (my dad) was born 16 March 1920 in Howell County, Missouri. Most likely, it was a home birth as my maternal grandmother’s mother Mary Elizabeth Pentecost Smith Yates (Will’s father Jim and Minnie’s mother Mary were married) was a midwife of sorts for the family. The photo below is my dad William G. Yates, age about 4 months.

gale-yates-baby-picture

 

SHOCKED TUMWATER GIRL FORCED TO BE PHOTOGRAPHED WITH CLOWN IN GROCERY STORE

Carol and Clown

Carol and Clown

Or, the short title should read, “I may be smiling, but I was really mortified”. I think this photo was taken in either 1962 or 1963. It was taken at Southgate Market in Tumwater, Washington and if the clown is any of my schoolmate’s father or other male relative, I’m sorry, but I just found this photo ambush so embarrassing. I don’t even know what it was all for. You can see me holding my arms in “protection mode”. Here’s the thing I took away from this event. Just because I was young in age doesn’t mean I was immature. That said, I always became wary of anyone in costume who might want to invade “my space”. I think most clowns are embarrassing, probably because they have to act stupid in public.

I will say, I did enjoy the clownish antics of Emmett Kelly (Weary Willie) and Red Skelton (Freddy the Freeloader) though.

English: Red Skelton as Freddie the Freeloader...

English: Red Skelton as Freddie the Freeloader, Carol Sydes, Frank McHugh from Skelton’s 1959 television show. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

How To Change Your Feed Title and Description

iPentimento 150

It took me a whole day to find how to do it, but I finally found the way to change my RSS feed title/description to the way I wanted it to read. When I was just beginning to optimize and publicize this blog, I mistakenly thought it would only be going out to subscribers who read it in readers and not realizing that a feed can be used by email subscription services like MailChimp as well.

When I did a test send for my new MailChimp campaign for iPentimento I was dissatisfied with the Feed Title and did a little “poking around” in FeedBurner and clicked on the tab Optimize, scrolled down on the left side of the page to Title/Description burner and as you can see in the image I was able make my desired changes.

Feedburner Title Desc

As I said, I am now using MailChimp for subscribers for this blog and it’s sister Pentimento. (Pentimento isn’t a genealogy blog, just my personal one for ideas, opinions and insights.)

1912 Washington State Gun Fanatics

George Martin, Will Yates, , Lem Yates

Gun Fanaticism Or Just Practicality?

Admittedly, I don’t really know what these men really felt about their guns and how ‘fanatical’ they might have been about using them. Anything I say here about them comes from my own views of how my family used their rifles, how they talked about them, and our family history with guns.

First, a little background on the people in this picture and where it was taken. From left to right is George Martin, obviously older than the other men in the picture. Next is William K Yates (my paternal grandfather, age 20), unknown man, and far right is Will Yates’ older brother Lemuel W Yates (age 25). On the back of this picture postcard is the postmark of “July 6, 1912 Union Mills, Washington.” I suppose it’s possible that the picture was taken somewhere else and then made into a postcard sent from Washington.

George Martin, Will Yates, , Lem Yates

All that said, I do believe it was taken near Union Mills, WA. I’m not showing the back of the postcard here, but I do have the original and it has been clipped along the edges, and the original message on the postcard was written in pencil and is now so light after 115 years I’m unable to read it. Union Mills, Washington was located in Thurston County near what is now the town of Lacey and was base for the Union Lumber Company.

Union Lumber Co. History

Source: Encyclopedia of Western Railroad History: Oregon, Washington

 By Donald B. Robertson

So, were they fanatics about their guns? I think they were in the sense that they felt they were a invaluable tool which they could always use to hunt game to feed their families. Or, at least supplement the larder at home. Considering there were no freezers of size at the time I assume they would dress their game in the woods if it was large like a deer, perhaps cutting it in smaller sections to be shared as they saw fit, and much of it eaten immediately. In this picture, I don’t think the men were actively hunting, but rather ‘posing’ for the photographer to make it look like an interesting tableau. The reason I say that is because it was probably taken and sent in July as the postmark indicates, and hunting season wasn’t until much later in the fall.

One thing I do know from my family history with my dad, “Never touch my gun” was law in our house and neither my brother nor I ever considered going against that edict. The men in my family (none of the women hunted, as far as I know) were fanatics about gun safety. I don’t think any of the hunters in the family ever used pistols because it just wouldn’t have been practical for their needs. I do know that when my dad hunted in he used a .30-06. I wonder what happened to that rifle. I bet my brother has it.