November 24, 2014

How To Edit Amazon Seller Photos In PicMonkey

PicMonkey Logo

PicMonkey to the Rescue

PicMonkey Logo

I ran into an interesting challenge recently when I was trying to upload a photo of an item I am selling on Amazon. I had taken some photos with my cell phone and when they were uploaded to the listing, every single one of them was in need of rotation. I tried everything and then thought I would try a site I use all the time for photo manipulation: PicMonkey. As you have guessed, it worked like a charm and within a few minutes I had my photos included with my listing, and it was ready to go live. Of course, this is not just something you can use on the Amazon site, but anywhere you need to edit photos.

For those of you who haven’t ever tried PicMonkey, you can use it for free. I am a “Royal” user, which means I don’t see any ads. If ads don’t bother you, then all you have to do is sign up on the site for a free account and get creative. There are a few things that PM doesn’t make available to free users, like special fonts and such. But more than enough goodies to do what you want.

Genealogy News You Can Use

Jamboree logo

Jamboree logo

It’s Jamboree Time!

A quick shout out about two things genealogy related. One is that starting today there will be an exciting genealogy Jamboree hosted by the Southern California Genealogical Society and attended by all sorts of my genealogy friends from far and wide. If you are unable to attend, you can still take part online by watching their Live Streamed Sessions.  Five of the sessions ask for a nominal payment, while 14 of them are free for your family tree climbing enjoyment.

Help Save Fairview Cemetery in Greenwood, South Carolina

Saving Stories Logo (2)

May 31st of this year marked the first day of cleanup at the Fairview Cemetery with 32 volunteers ready to pitch in and uncover the long-forgotten and neglected graves, some of which belong to my friend Robin Foster’s family members. You can read more about their efforts on Robin’s blog Saving Stories.

23andMe And The 1004 DNA Relatives

When I began doing genealogy decades ago it never really was on my radar that we would be able to find and connect with cousins using our DNA. Now, here we are and our cousins are not only found, but verified by documentation and genetically. We had my husband Jim’s DNA tested through 23andMe some years ago, and we’ve been pleasantly surprised at how many cousins of his paternal and maternal side have also used 23andMe as well and been able to contact us easily.

What We’ve Found

Many things we expected to see were English, Irish and French percentages that would be quite high. What we weren’t sure of was whether or not there was any Native American in Jim’s DNA. Just last year when his profile was updated by 23andMe it showed that there is a 0.1% of Native American blood in Jim’s paternal side of the family. We know now that what we suspected was true, but we’re still on the hunt for the elusive ancestor who brought that DNA into the family.

 What? We Have Jewish Ancestors?

Another surprising bit was that there’s also a 0.6% of Ashkenazi Jewish DNA in the line as well. As it pertains to the Wilkerson line, that was probably a mixing of DNA with some of the family’s northern European lines. As the 23andMe page explains it, “You share DNA history with 23andMe customers that have reported full Ashkenazi ancestry”.


And last, but not least, Jim also has 2.8% of Neanderthal DNA. I find this very interesting, and not because of any humorous aspect, but because, to me, it says the Neanderthals might not have survived to be a recognizable human in present time, but their mixing of DNA with other humanoids says “we adapted”. Who knows what they truly looked like? I mean, after all, “someone” had to be attracted to them, right?

It’s All Relatives

23andMe reports that, as of now, Jim has 1004 DNA relatives; 6 second and third cousins, and 344 fourth cousins. Over time, this number will likely increase. We have made contact with the closest ones with surnames like Boyert, Miller, etc. There are probably many more with whom we could connect, but their DNA profiles are private and not shared.

Historical Maryland Cabin Is Moved To A New Lakeside Location

Cabin

Cabin

The Chester Cabin “Houyhnhnm”

The cabin in this video was built in 1927 from old, dead chestnut trees from a location in Maryland. I’m purposely not giving too much information about the owners and it’s new location in order to preserve the owner’s security. I love the way the video was filmed, as well as the story written by the owner and presented from the cabin’s point of view. I hope you enjoy it, and will give it a good rating on YouTube if you do.

 

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