December 19, 2014

Allene Moore Chapin 1915 – 2010 Newspaper Woman

Allene Moore Chapin pg 1

Her brother Dick Moore called her Mary Allene, but when she and I first began to share family information she instructed me to call her Allene.  Allene will always be thought of in my mind as one of those “grand gals” with spirit and the spunk to speak her mind.  Sadly, I never got to meet her in person, but we had many spirited phone calls, during one of which she told me my voice sounded like my Grandma Minnie.

Allene was one of the few cousins I could talk to about grandma who knew her as their aunt.  Allene was one of those people who would make you feel like family from the first moment you met.  No fussing around, just come on in and sit a spell.  I loved to listen to her speak with that fine Missouri sing-song twang I remember so well from my Grandpa Will Yates and his side of the family.

As one of the founding members of the Ozark Spring Chapter of the DAR, Allene was instrumental in having me join their ranks.  It was for sentimental reasons that I joined that chapter instead of one here in Washington state.  Allene wanted to be one of the ladies who signed my application for membership as a tribute to my grandmother.  As it turned out, I wasn’t able to join through her Patriot because there needed to be more documentation, but I was able to tell her of a few “new” ones, including my Captain Thomas Poindexter.

When I said “spirited” to describe Allene it was our conversation about the “Oglethorpes” that I remembered.  Many years ago Allene, Pauline Pond, and Ruth Dixon put together a family tree of sorts from what they knew and remembered hearing from their ancestors.  When I began looking for my ‘Oglethorpes’ in Clay, Overton and Jackson, Tennessee I soon found out that there were no Oglethorpes of any kind there.  What was there were the Osgatharps and they had been in that part of Tennessee for generations.  I had to send her tangible proof of the family name so she would believe me! Once she had that though, and found that our line connected to Richard Osgatharp/Osgathorpe who had served in the American Revolution, she was accepting of the name change.

A wonderful lady has passed from our midst, but she will never be forgotten. Even if you don’t know her I hope that you will take a few minutes to read her obituary by her son that was extremely well written . I’m adding the two pages as thumbnails. Please click on them till you get them to the size to make them more easily read.

Page 1

Page 2

Rest in Peace Allene

A Festival of Postcards: Wheels

will-yates-1909-front-back-card

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Jim and I are going out of town for a few days on a car trip, so I want to leave you with a recent post. I’m participating in a genealogy carnival A Festival of Postcards, with the topic this time of “wheels”. You may not see many actual wheels in this picture, but it was taken in Springfield, Missouri in 1909 when my Grandfather Will Yates was just a young man. That’s him on the far right with the white neckerchief around his neck.

will-yates-1909-mo-back-of-card

I believe this picture was taken at a railroad repair yard (hence, the wheels connection).  Grandpa was writing to his father Jim Yates in West Plains, Missouri and the short note reads, “Hello how are you all down there? How is the corn. Write to me. W. Yates”.

This photo is special to our family because it is the earliest one we have of Grandpa Will. I have never seen any baby or childhood pictures of him, but times were tough and our family wasn’t anywhere near wealthy. Grandpa was born March 14, 1892, so he would have been around 17 years old when this picture was taken. That may seem young now to be out working, but I bet he had been working for a few years (or all of his life in some way) even before that.

will-k-yates-as-a-young-man

The above photo was taken around the same time. Looks pretty dapper, doesn’t he? For a little added “wheels” the photo below is my dad at age two in the car they rode in when the family came to Washington state. Take note: There was no windshield on the car in this picture, or for that road trip either. Grandma must have been a saint!

wg-yates-1922-with-truck

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