November 27, 2014

How To Clean A Headstone – Advice From The Artist

Mary E. and John Whitmore.

If you are planning a trip to the cemetery to clean some headstones, you should check out this advice from Roy Dixon. Roy is an authority because he designs and creates hand carved memorials for Leyda, Burrus and Metz Monument Company in Burlington, Iowa. Roy has been a regular reader of iPentimento for a while now and to show my appreciation, I would like to introduce you to his website and show you what a talented artist he is.

roy dixon cemetery monuments and memorials

Just a little side note from me. I once read about an intrepid genealogist who was out in a farm field and she had the idea to use flour to make the writing on an old stone show up more clearly. This was not a very good idea though. There were cattle in the field and even though the stones had some fencing around them, the cows were crazy to get to that flour. You guessed it, they made their way through the fencing, and proceeded to lick that flour off the stones. That wouldn’t have been so bad, but it also damaged the stones and knocked some over. So, never use flour on the stones. Instead, use your common sense. Or, binoculars?

Below is an older photo of my husband’s Great Great Grandfather John Whitmore’s old headstone prior to 1997 when the Medal of Honor Society arranged for a new one to be place on his grave.

Mary E. and John Whitmore.

Mary E. and John Whitmore.

Genealogy Tracking: Wilkersons, Whitmores and L. Frank Boyd

Part 1

In 1994, when I first began doing our family genealogies, my father-in-law sent us some copies of old pictures he had of his Bean and Whitmore families. He knew more about the Beans than he did John Whitmore, but we were anxious to find out more about all of them. And so began the search.

During one of our visits to Iowa in 1995 I had an opportunity to talk to my father-in-law about his family history. He being the oldest of ten children, and having a memory like a steel trap, I knew that he would be the one to ask about what he knew of the earlier generations of Jim’s Wilkerson family. Loren did tell us that his father Wesley had been born in Des Moines County, Iowa, near Yarmouth, but he also said that there were no more Wilkersons living in southern Iowa “as far as he knew”. That always sends up a red flag to a family genealogist, and so during that visit we made a point of going to Des Moines County to see if we could find out what happened to the family.

We were looking for Wilkersons, Whit(t)mores, DeSpains and any other connecting family names when we pulled into the parking lot at Shiner Cumberland Presbyterian Church at Pleasant Grove in order to walk the cemetery. When we drove up we noticed an older pickup truck parked near the church, but we were intent on finding headstones and so we got out in the misty rain with paper, pencil and camera in hands and began our search. Almost right away we were finding all the names we were looking for, but not quite the specific older family members. After scribbling down as much information as we could glean from the headstones, we decided to ask inside the church about where the church records were kept.

This is rural Iowa where most of the people are warm, welcoming and friendly, as we were about to find out. After opening the door at the side of the church and calling “hello” a couple times, a very nice lady came to the bottom of the basement stairs to answer our questions. She had been painting one of the restrooms, but stopped right then and there and let us tell our “story” and the names we were looking for. After a bit, she got on the phone and called the church sexton, Mr. Stucker. His wife said he was “out in the fields” but that she would give him the message when he came in for lunch.

It seemed like just minutes later that another older pickup truck rolled into the gravel parking lot, and down the stairs came Mr. Stucker, farm boots and all, with his sexton’s book in hand. After introducing ourselves again and explaining our quest, he very willingly and generously handed his book to me, and I hurriedly copied down names, dates and grave locations while Mr. Stucker and my husband talked. As Jim and Mr. Stucker talked, Mr. Stucker said that his best friend was “Toad” Wilkerson and lived next door to him. (“Next door” means the next 80 acres or so close by!) He encouraged us to stop by and see “Toad” on our way home.

John Whitmore

At one point, when Jim said that we were looking for John Whitmore, Mr. Stucker perked right up and told us that John Whitmore was a Medal of Honor recipient in the Civil War, and that there was a Medal of Honor Society looking for living family members! We had no idea of John Whitmore’s Civil War service at that time. (to be continued)

iPentimento – COI 10th Edition – Costume

john-whitmore-family-group

We’re celebrating the 10th Edition of the Carnival of Images with the word prompt: Costume

john-whitmore-family-group

John and Mary (DeSpain) Whitmore center-front

Children behind L-R: Cordelia, John, Mariah, Mary and William

This photo was most likely taken before 1904 because the youngest boy, William, died in January of that year. I have chosen this photo for the Carnival because of the elaborate dresses the ladies are wearing.

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