December 20, 2014

Adding An Ethnicity Fact In Family Tree Maker

FTM fact window

Isn’t it amazing how our friends in the genealogy community can open our eyes to not only new tools, plugins, and other handy blog add-ons?  And, they do the same thing when it comes to making genealogy programs work for 21st century researchers.

As an example, George Geder at Geder Genealogy has done a whole series this week on genealogy software and how it needs to change to reflect the needs of blended families, etc..  I was left asking myself, “Why didn’t I think of that?”.  One suggestion that he made really hit home with me:  the ability to add ‘ethnicity’ to a person’s individual profile.

I’m still using FTM 2006, so I can’t speak to more recent versions, but I was able to add a new fact quite easily, and it might be something you would like to add also. Here’s how I did it:

Add Fact

The Add Fact dialog box lets you add a new fact to an individual or marriage record.

To select from the existing fact list, click the down arrow attached to the Type field and select the Fact Type from the list that appears.

To add a new Fact Type, enter a brief description in the Type field. [ I added Ethnic Origin as my fact name] Note that there are separate Fact Type lists for individual and marriage records, and that a new Type added to one list will not be added to the other.

Enter the Date and Place or Description information in the appropriate fields; then click the OK button to save your new Fact.  Entering date for ethnic origin wasn’t relevant exactly, so I left it blank, but in Place or Description I added African American for this particular family member.

By adding this new fact category, I will now be able to add more detailed information about family members.  Since our families [mine and Jim’s] are predominantly Caucasian, denoting ethnic heritage will only be added when it’s a known fact.

The above photo was taken in May 2000 when my cousin Tracy Prantl Richardson turned 86 (near center in pink sweater) and my cousin Fran Prantl Harbeston’s widower Herb (front row, right of Tracy) Harbeston turned 90.  Everyone in this photo is related by blood or marriage. I too am in this photo just back from Herb in the second row.

When my first cousin Gordon Yates married his wife Christl Messerschmidt in 1976, our family was enhanced by Christl’s Indonesian ethnicity. (Photo above was taken in 1996; left to right: Dustin, Gordon, Brett, uncle Wally and Mike Yates.

And the ladies of the Wally Yates family – 1996: L-R Sandy (Boom), Stephanie, Twyla, Jennifer, Sarina and Christl Yates.

Celebrate Your Differences

One last note, I think we should celebrate our differences, not let them divide us.

Two Upcoming Centenarian Birthdays In Our Family – Tracy Prantl Harbeston passed away in 2007, but Herb Harbeston turned 100 on May 20, 2010.  The other centenarian was one of my Breedlove cousins.

Genealogy Comes Naturally To Heirloom Gardeners

Flowering Almond 2007

The Story Behind The Plant In This Photo

(continued from Pentimento blog post How To Propagate A Flowering Almond Shrub)

The flowering almond above is a ‘child’ of a plant that was already well-established in our yard way back in the 1950’s.  That was in Tumwater, Washington and the house was an old farmhouse with many old trees, shrubs and flower bulbs planted everywhere.  My brother and I, along with our parents lived in that house from about 1952 to 1982 when my parents moved to live with my grandpa in Olympia.  In that year my sister-in-law Kathy got a start from the Dennis Street flowering almond as did my mom get one to plant at my grandpa’s place.  I chose not to get a start off the plant at that time, even though I was living in Washington too, and as it turned out we moved to Florida for four years and came back in 1992.

It was just a few years ago that I decided I finally had a place to plant a start of the family flowering almond.  It makes me smile to think about the original one from my childhood that always heralded spring with its pretty pink blossoms all along the stems and how it’s not just people who “migrate” but they also take their plants with them!

Did any of your ancestors bring plants with them when they migrated?


Discover

2010: Jim and Carol Yates Wilkerson Wed 40 Years

Jim & Carol wedding closeup 2

I was just 20 by a week, and Jim was 21.  We were married by Judge Thorpe at the court house in Olympia, Washington at about 7:30 PM.

Jim’s parents and a friend had driven all the way from Iowa to attend the wedding (parents do that sort of thing) of their only son.  We didn’t know they were coming, and it was quite a surprise when they drove in the driveway of my parent’s house in Tumwater a couple days before the wedding.

Jim and Carol Yates Wilkerson

09 September 1970

Those attending the wedding were: Gale and Joan Yates (my parents); Dave, Kathy and Eric Yates; Lenny and Judy Wallace; Will and Josie Yates; Ron Rutherford; Rose Atchinson; Loren and Toots Wilkerson.


Jim and Carol Yates Wilkerson

40th Anniversary 2010

Do You Have Favorite Family Members?

Minnie Smith age 12

Are there favorite family members you like to research or write about?  Until someone else posed this question, I hadn’t really given it much thought just who I seemed to write about the most.  I think about several of my ancestors quite often though, and wish that I could have met them.

Minnie Smith Yates

I’ve written about my two grandmothers before in Growing Up Grandma-less where I explain how much you lose when you never get to know your grandmother.  I think about my Grandma Minnie Yates quite often, especially now that I have two granddaughters of my own. What would I have learned from her? I wonder…

Donald, Helen, Joan, Jeane and Joyce Moline

My maternal grandmother, Helen Nordgren Moline, had a very short life, but she left us with a mystery.  Well, several mysteries.  She was killed by a hit and run driver as she stood on a corner in Seattle in September of 1929.  At the time, she was already living away from her husband, two adopted children and three biological daughters.

In 1930 Grandpa Moline and the three girls are living with another young woman in the house, presumably the adopted daughter.  But where was the adopted son Donald Moline?  And, why two adopted children when they had three girls? Did Grandpa want a boy so bad to carry on his name that he wanted Grandma to keep having babies till she ‘gave him one’, and when she had my mother, the youngest and another girl, did they decide to adopt?

~~~

There are plenty more people for favorites in Jim’s family too:

Henry Skaggs, one of the “long hunters” who ( I was told) had an unnatural relationship with his granddaughters.  He’s not my favorites because of that, just the long hunter part because he was one of the pioneers who went into Kentucky with men such as Daniel Boone.

My husband Jim is a descendant of Henry Skaggs through Henry’s marriage to Susan Scott. Their daughter Nancy Skaggs married Peter DeSpain. Of that union a son, John DeSpain married (3) Mariah Perkins. John and Mariah’s daughter Mary Elizabeth DeSpain married John W. Whitmore, a Medal of Honor recipient in the Civil War. The DeSpain and Whitmore families settled in Des Moines County near Pleasant Grove, Iowa.  Peter DeSpain and Nancy Skaggs had 19 children.  I know she probably had no choice, but I sure admire that woman!

Mariah Perkins DeSpain

Who are your favorite ancestors? Let me know by leaving a comment, please.

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