September 18, 2017

Aaron Carapella – He’s Bringing Awareness of Tribal Nations Traditional and Current Names

Tribal Nations Maps by Aaron Carapella

Aaron Carapella has created a whole collection of maps designating the true tribal nation’s traditional and current names and placing them on maps that encompass the North and South American continents, Alaska and the Caribbean. To see the variety of what Aaron has created, please visit this page and see how you can order one (or more) today. (I’m not an affiliate, just a friend).

Would you like to see these maps in schools? You can also do so by donating to Aaron’s GoFundMe page as well. What a great idea to bring true Native American and indigenous people’s history and awareness to our children and adults alike!

This endeavor by Aaron isn’t a big money maker for him. He has done this as a labor of love and history and it’s been made available to us all through his hard work. Let’s help him by donating, or buying a map. You may notice some watermarks in the image, but they won’t be on the actual maps.

 

 

Was Johan a Larson, an Anderson or a Nordgren?

Tracking the Life of Johan Andersson from Sweden to Washington State

 

I thought maybe he was a Larsson, because that was the name his brother (also Johan/John B went by. But… It’s taken me years to understand where and how to look for information on my ancestor Johan Andersson who was born 6 May 1868 in Veddige, Halland, Sweden. I’m not done by any means, but this article will bring everything up to date regarding what I know now.

Johan/John Andersson Nordgren immigrated to North America in 1883/4 (1920 US Fed Census) and his oldest child Andrew Leonard Nordgren along with his wife Anna Lena Andreasd?tter (Anderson) who arrived later. I know this sounds convoluted, but as far as I know Johan came to America first, and his wife stayed in Sweden and didn’t arrive until around early 1892. I know she was in the United States because Andrew Leonard was born 01 Sept 1892. Going by the normal span of pregnancies lasting 9 months, one can assume that John and Anna Lena were together in one location near the end of December or early January.

The Andersson surname is a recent discovery I found on Ancestry in the Swedish marriage records for Johan/John and Anna Lena. Finding that record set me off in a whole new direction, but I’m still confused. Of course, that’s the fun of doing genealogical research. All these puzzle pieces, but in this instance each piece could be going by a few different names.

This is what puzzles me: Did John Andersson ever go by the surname Larsson/Larson while he was in the USA. The reason I wonder this is because John’s brother John Bernt went by the surname Larson. The two John’s mother was named Anna Lena as well and she also had come to the United States in 1892. She was a widow and her husband Anders Larson had died around 1876 in Denmark. [Note: I just read recently that if you’re looking for records in Denmark you might try looking in German records as well.]

Back to my John Anderson [Nordgren] line.

  • John, Anna Lena and their son [we called him Leonard] were in Hector, Renville, MN in 1892.
  • Uncle Leonard said that he and his mother went back to Sweden for a while. John went back to Sweden too, but then something changed their minds again and they came back to the USA sometime between 1893/4 and lived in an unknown location.
  • The next child, my grandmother Hulda was born in 1896 near Odebolt, Sac, Iowa. Why were they in Iowa? We’re they migrating and great grandma had to stop to have Hulda? They must have had to stay for a while in Iowa because in1897 another girl, Olive Josephine was born that year.
  • Two years later the family of five has moved on to Bellingham, Whatcom, Washington and we know this because another daughter is born in 1899. Sadly, this daughter Ester, died about a month later that same year.
  • Two more children were born in Washington, Oscar in 1902; Edith Elvera in 1906.

One last thing that I’m wondering is a woman called Alice Anderson. My mom told me that when she lived in Seattle during the war years (WWII) that a woman named Alice Anderson used to come see her and they would go exploring together. Mom was the only daughter left at home during those years, as her sister Jeane was married and living elsewhere, and the other sister Joyce, was either in nursing school, or had graduated and was working in Alaska or in the Army.

So, the big question is, “was Alice a relative to John”? There had to be some reason why she was around.

 

In Memory of my cousin Tooter Yates 1946-2017

In my early days of doing genealogy I tried almost every method in order to make contact with cousins in various locations. I wrote a letter to the West Plains, MO Quill stating my relationship to my Yates, Pentecost and Smith families in that area. The response was heartwarming letters from people who knew my great grandfather Jim Yates, and a hearty representation of cousins who still lived there.

My second foray into contacting people was to make a phone call to someone in Tennessee named Yates. That man said he knew who “Polky” Yates was (James Knox Polk Yates, to be precise) but he didn’t know much more. I was very new to making contact with people like that and so I didn’t try to call him again. But, I didn’t give up. I knew there had to be Yates family there in Roane County, so I looked up addresses and found one for a Isa Bea Yates. So, I took a chance and wrote her a letter, telling her who I was and how I was connected to the Yates line.

In no time at all I received a phone call from a man named “Tooter” Yates and that began a long friendship with him that spanned over 20 years. Tooter was actually Truman Dillinger Yates and his nickname had been bestowed on him by his grandmother who, when she first held him as a little baby said, “He’s a tooter!”. Isn’t that sweet?

Tooter passed away last month, right before his 71st birthday. I will miss him and his Tennessee voice that would become so familiar and loved. Rest in peace dear cousin. You’ve earned it. Obituary below.

Obituary for Dillinger Truman Yates

Dillinger (Tooter) Truman Yates, age 70, of Ten Mile, passed away Wednesday, May 31, 2017 at his home surrounded by his family.

He was born June 29, 1946 in Roane County where he has been a life long resident. He was a dedicated member of Ponders Gap Baptist Church and Maranatha Church in Midway.

Tooter was a retired truck driver from the K-25 Nuclear Plant after working 37 years.

Preceded in death by his son, Kenny Yates; daughter, Coleen Turner Yates; parents, William & Isabea Hall Yates; brothers, Leslie & Harles Yates.

SURVIVORS Loving Wife of 27 years Sue Ann Piper Yates of Ten Mile Children Jimmy & Kathie Yates of Sweetwater Sally & Tony Ivey of Spartenburg, SC Patty Clark of Kingston, Tobey Yates of Ten Mile, Makayla & Dylan Adkins of Ten Mile, Katie Yates of Ten Mile Frankie & Angie Taylor of Tell City, IN, Kenny Farmer of Morganton, NC, Brother William & Jackie Yates of Sweetwater, Patrick & Robin Yates of Spring City, Casey Yates of Sweetwater, Sister Gloria Yates of Paint Rock, Special Nephew Willie Yates of Harriman, Life Long Friend Gerald Webster of Oliver Springs, 4 Brothers-in-law and 5 Sisters-in-law, Several grandchildren, great-grandchildren and a host of extended family and friends

The family will receive friends 4:00 – 6:00 pm, Sunday, June 4, 2017 at Ponders Gap Baptist Church. Funeral service will be held 2:00 pm, Monday at the church with Rev. Tommy Patterson and Rev. Tom Clipner officiating. Interment will follow the service at Kelsey-Yates Cemetery in Ten Mile.

Online register book can be signed at www.FrakerFuneralHome.net . Fraker Funeral Home of Kingston is in charge of all the arrangements.

The Pros and Cons of Not Re-Shelving Genealogy Books in the Library

What’s The Alternative To Not Re-Shelving Genealogy Books?

Amy Johnson Crow shared an article this week in regard to the reason you should not re-shelve genealogy books in the library, and I would like to address the other side of the issue. The libraries don’t want you to re-shelve the books because it helps them keep track of which books are being used, which in turn equates to money for the library through showing that usage.

My experience with this was at the Burlington, Iowa library in their genealogical section. When we walked in there were bookshelves full of books, but some were missing from their places. There were very large tables strewn with books both open and closed. If we wanted to look a a book we either had to close the books on the table or see if it was in the bookshelf. Doing that was very time consuming and frustrating for us because we had a finite period of time to do our research since we were visiting from out of town. Our home was thousands of miles away and we couldn’t just pop back in another time.

The dilemma that I see in this situation is that while the librarians don’t want us to re-shelve books, they can’t always get in to the genealogy section several times a day to count and re-shelve so the patrons are left with the books on the tables and empty slots in the bookshelves. All of us want to be responsible patrons and make the librarian’s job easier, but surely there has to be a better way than having books in the way, or seemingly missing.

Have An Honor System For Showing Use Of Genealogy Books

As I see it, something has to give. Books need to be counted and re-shelved more often (by official volunteers) in order to make research easier, or have an honor system where when you choose a book you can make a note of it (you would anyway if you found information and wanted to cite it) and then be given the ability of re-shelving it to make it easier for other researchers to find it. Of course, you can cite that this method could be scammed by people just noting books to help the library financially, but I submit that it could very well go the other way and patrons could find it so much easier and actually are able to peruse more books and show the library that there in fact are more books being used than the library is aware of.

My thinking is that it would streamline the ability to find information more quickly, possibly create more honest income from the books being used, and keep the library section more neat and tables more accessible for those who might be looking at very large books. How frustrating it is to have to move books from one table to another just to be able to sit down and look at a book!

Some other articles you might find helpful:

[intlink id=”551″ type=”post”]A Dozen Genealogy Books I Own[/intlink] [intlink id=”207″ type=”post”]A Wish List for Genealogists[/intlink] [intlink id=”2026″ type=”post”]Adapting Boy Scout Law To Your Genealogy[/intlink]

© Carol Wilkerson 2017

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