September 19, 2017

FREE Shipping when you order Flip-Pal today!

I have been using my FlipPal mobile scanner for my genealogical  business and personal use for about 5 years and even take it with me when I travel to visit family and friends. Many of you are wanting to scan and organize your vintage photos and other priceless keepsakes. If you’re visiting family, or they are visiting you during the holidays, now is the perfect time to scan photos and preserve your history. Sometimes, they are scattered in boxes and drawers, disorganized, aging, and unprotected from loss from water or fire. Photos that are difficult to remove from their picture frame, scrapbook or album. I recommend the Flip Pal mobile scanner – it’s a fun way to convert them into digital format.

Drop a hint to Santa about this special offer. Buy a FlipPal Holiday Value Pack. $154.97 ($25 off) and FREE SHIPPING. Sale ends December 22nd.

Flip-Pal

Want to see how easy it is to open the package, set up the scanner and start scanning? Here’s a video you might enjoy.

Merry Christmas everyone!

When Grandmas Go Wild – Lillian V Epstein Moline

When Grandmas Go Wild

My Grandmas personalities seemed to me to be at opposite ends of the “wildness” spectrum, and it was most obvious in this picture of my mom’s step mother Lillian Vera Epstein Moline. My other grandmother, my dad’s step mother Josie McVey Yates, was as docile as they come. I did hear her say “shit” once, but it was not her normal language.

I didn’t see my Moline grandparents as often as my Yates ones because they lived in Seattle and when I was growing up going to Seattle was a ‘big excursion’. I say that because before Interstate 5 was built all we had for the main road was Highway 99, and it took hours to get to Seattle on a two lane road.

My two sets of grandparents knew each other because at one time they lived in the same mill town of Bordeaux, WA. Grandpa Yates worked in the mill as a “setter” for the saws that reduced the big trees to long slabs of dimensional lumber. My grandpa Moline, who had more education, worked for the Mumby Lumber company as a salesman. His wife, “Eppie” was a registered nurse, but when they moved to Bordeaux in 1933 she kept it pretty quiet that she had any medical training so as not to be constantly asked for help.

Grandma Eppie had a very outgoing and humorous personality. Most likely because when you’ve been a nurse, you’ve seen it all and some human behavior can be pretty funny. Eppie’s ethnicity was Jewish. She was loud, liked to tell jokes, play bridge and smother us with slobbery kisses. Kisses were given while blubbering when we first got together for a visit, and the same at the end of the visit.

I can’t be sure who took this picture, but I suspect it was my grandpa Al (Elvin Moline) because Eppie would have done this kind of pose for him, and my brother Dave would have posed like that to go along with the frisky behavior. Grandpa Al always had a camera with him and usually one of the more expensive ones, rather than the “Brownie” box camera that my parents had. I’m just guessing, but I think this picture was taken in the 1950’s sometime, just going by the makes and models of the cars. The Ford in the background belonged to my Grandpa Yates and as far as I know he bought it new, with cash.

Other clues in the picture are my brother’s size which makes me think he was around twelve or thirteen. The shed in the background eventually was re-roofed and dad built a car port off the side facing us in the photo. I know one thing, this picture was taken before October 12, 1962 because several of the trees in the picture didn’t survive that storm. Surprisingly enough, the tree under where Grandpa Yates parked his Ford was a huge cherry tree and it did make it through the “Big Blow”. The other big tree in the background was an apple tree and it didn’t survive.

I realize that anyone else looking at this old black and white photo won’t have the same feeling about it that I do. Even my brother probably has other, deeper, memories than I do since he was older. This picture, for all of its ‘old-timey’ look and the antics of my grandma, is my connection to my history when we lived on Dennis Street in Tumwater, Washington. We didn’t live in a grand house, and we lived all the way at the end of the end of the road, but it was my world. I have history here. I have good and bad memories of living here. And, for the time the photo or this article lasts, it’s proof that we lived interesting lives. Rest in peace Grandma Eppie, you are not forgotten.

[intlink id=”2507″ type=”post”]Lillian Vera Epstein Moline 1904 – 1975[/intlink] [intlink id=”2238″ type=”post”]52 Weeks of Personal Genealogy & History – Weather[/intlink]

Google Books: A Surprising Source For Genealogical Documentation

 

My budget is pretty tight when it comes to genealogical research, so when I found I could add documentation to my family tree using (mostly) free Google Books, you can imagine my elation.

Google-Books

Most recently, [intlink id=”4040″ type=”post”]I found a book[/intlink] about Archibald Glasscock Register written by one of his descendants (G. W. Register Jones) and originally compiled by two of his daughters from letters he had sent to family members back in Greene County, Tennessee.

The title of this article is somewhat misleading in that the results of a search in Google Books doesn’t just bring back links to books, but any sort of written documentation that has been added to Google. It could be old newspaper articles, snippets from books, biographies, or even lists from surname newsletters. So far, I’ve just scratched the surface of what’s available.

My Book List On Google

My current preferred method of adding books to my book list on Google is on my PC, but you can also add them to your device using Google Play and read them on your tablet, e-reader or phone. Depending on the amount of storage you might have on each device, you’ll be able to start reading on one, stop, and then continue on another. For more detailed information please visit Google’s Supported reading device (“best for”) page.

Surnames I’m researching in Greene County, Tennessee are: REGISTER, CHANCE, YATES, KELSEY, ROBERTSON, HACKER and GLASSCOCK.

 

#PBS Genealogy Roadshow Reminder

Genealogy Roadshow logo

Just a quick reminder…don’t forget to watch the premier episode of Genealogy Roadshow tonight on your local PBS station. Just in case, you might want to set your recorder for the series. I did!

If your genealogy juices get flowing afterwards, please visit my friend Thomas MacEntee’s blog…

  • Cyndi’s List for genealogy links, and the other mega genealogy links website…

Don’t forget to search my page…

FREE stuff and search the 1940 census

 

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