September 18, 2017

Documentation that John Nordgren’s middle name was Gormley

John Nordgren’s middle name was Gormley

This newest documentation is also proof that you should always revisit sites like Ancestry again and again, because new information is being added all the time. That’s where I found this birth record for my great aunt Edith Elvera Nordgren.

It’s a little hard to decipher the document because it doesn’t seem like a normal birth record. It doesn’t have any identifying official notations at the top of the page, other than “Register of Births in _______ County, State of Washington”. In looking at the locations where the children and their parents lived, it was quite a spread out area, but I suspect it was all in Whatcom County even though it’s not noted on the sheet.

Specifically, for Edith’s family the details for her, and them, are hard to read. What I can see is that Edith is listed with her full name, date of birth, gender, her mother’s name*, mother’s age and mother’s place of birth; in the line for her father it list his first and middle name**, age, and place of birth. It also lists the father’s vocation and who he is working for at the time.***

*The mother is listed as Anna Lena Anderson. This is Anna Lena’s married name, not her maiden name, which was Andreasdotter.

**Since Edith is listed as Edith Elvera Nordgren, but the year is 1907, that means that John G was already going by the surname of Nordgren which leads me to believe he had changed his surname from Andersson some time before. He came to America as Johan Andersson. His brother John Bernt went by the surname Larson. The mother of the two boys was Anna Lena Jönsdotter Larson who had also come to the United States. We know this because she is listed in census records, and she is buried in Minnesota. (Originally, the surname was probably Larsson when they were living in Sweden.

Also, keep in mind that John had filed more than once for Naturalization, and eventually made it in 1907. Was he already going by Nordgren because that was the name he filed under and did it for continuity?

***John Gormley Nordgren was listed as an Engineer working for C I Hood. I have not yet found the company in Washington State business records. It could have been an out of state company doing business here.

Still, some mysteries remain for John G Nordgren. We know he lost his hand somehow because my mom remembered that he had a hook prosthesis.

  • The oldest child, Andrew was born in Minnesota.
  • The next two children, Hulda (my grandmother) and Olive Josephine, were both born in Iowa. Why were they living in Iowa? What occupation was John working that allowed him to take his wife and little son to Iowa? Did they know someone there? Or, was it just there was a job he could do? This time frame is the late 1800s. My grandmother was born in 1896, her sister the next year.
  • The next child, Esther, was born in Sept 1899 in Bellingham, Washington. Sadly, Esther died in October of that same year. Great grandmother Anna Lena was under great stress (my assumption) by having to have two babies born right after each other while they were in Iowa, and then sometime after 1897 the family made another major move which took them from the Midwest (Iowa) to Washington State. Could that have contributed to the loss of the baby Esther? Or, was there some other reason like illness involved?

I do know that from Washington State birth records that all of the children born here were delivered by midwife. Two more children, Oscar and Edith were both delivered by that method. Midwifery in those days had to be somewhat more primitive than present day midwifery.

 

 

 

A J Jacobs Global Family Reunion Set For 06 June 2015 In NY

In case this event hasn’t been on your radar, please add the date to your calendar for A J Jacobs’ (yes, we are cousins!) Global Family Reunion to take place in New York on 06 June 2015. He’s hoping to break the Guinness World Record in a completely familial way, by showing that we all are related.

Guest Webinar – A J Jacobs Click on the link to view it. Runs 43 minutes.
Personally, I think this is brilliant because it makes logical sense. No, I’m not a Vulcan, but logic pretty much guides my life and my research in turn. How?

Logic and Genealogy

  • Here’s one example, when you add birth and death dates for someone, and then add a child born to the mother it’s logical (but not impossible) that the female can’t have children too close in age to her own.
  • Using logic you look at the location of where your ancestor lived and when they don’t show up in a census for that location, maybe they didn’t move but the county or state boundaries did so.
  • Using logic you know that everyone on this planet is of human origin, and anthropologists have proven we originated in one location (Africa) and then we migrated all over the planet. It’s not too much of a stretch to think we all might be cousins.

AJ Jacobs - Carol Yates Wilkerson

[intlink id=”281″ type=”post”]From Six Mothers – Many Tribes[/intlink] [intlink id=”1202″ type=”category”]Genealogy Tips and Advice[/intlink]

Richard Lemuel Bean Migration: VT, MI and Iowa 1808 – 1869

Richard Lemuel Bean, son of Lemuel (S? or L?) Bean and unknown mother was born Birth 5 January 1808 in Windsor, Windsor, VT and his Death 16 Jan 1869 in Nashua, Chickasaw, IA

Richard married in 1833 to Sarah Cook whose Birth 04 Apr 1812 in Cornwall, ON, Canada ; her death 01 Aug 1895 in Nashua, Chickasaw, IA

In 1840 the family was living in Massena, St. Lawrence, NY and continued to live in that area until around 1849/50. This is evidenced by the birth locations of the first six children with the exception of Holton Bean who was born in Canada. It can only be speculated on why he might have been born there, but his mother was from Cornwall, Ontario, Canada which is located just across the St. Lawrence River from Massena, NY. Reasonable possibilities could be that because of winter time weather in that part of New York his mother might have been visiting her family in Canada when it was time for her son to be born, or that she was coincidentally there for some other reason.

In 1850, the Bean family was living in a completely different location: Woodhull township, Shiawassee, MI. Richard L. Bean and family is making his living as a farmer.

In 1860 the family had moved again, this time to their final destination, in Nashua, Chickasaw, IA where the last three children, Lemuel, Helen Jane and Andrew Bean were born.

Look For The Children, Find The Parents

Cornwall-Massena map

It was just by a little reverse sleuthing that I found Richard L. Bean and family in the 1850 census. I was searching the census for each child down the line chronologically and found Holton Bean with his parents in Michigan. As it turned out, the census taker had list the family as Richard, R L instead of as it should have been Bean, Richard L. Another instance that made it hard to find the family in that year was that the listing for them was at the bottom of the census page, with three of the children listed at the top of the following page. This is an important thing to keep in mind. Always try to find the children if you can’t find the parents.  

 

The Yates Family Lived In These States

The Yates Family Lived In These States
Make yours @ BigHugeLabs.com
Make yours @ BigHugeLabs.com
First Generation Yates
The line (so far) is traced to Roane County, TN and begins there with Miles Yates who married Debby Holmes there in 1840.
Second Generation
Son James Knox Polk Yates stayed in Roane County, but two of his children by his first wife, James William Milburn and Myra Yates migrated to Missouri with the Morrison family.
Third Generation
Jim Yates married Cerilda Breedlove in Missouri and at least one of their children moved to Oklahoma.  Almost all of the other Yates children migrated to Washington state to jobs connected to the lumber industry. They include: Lem, Elizabeth, Rhoda, Lydia, Will, and Martha.
Fourth Generation
One of Jim’s daughters, Cerilda, moved to California where she passed away. Son Will’s family (Gale, Guy and Waldo) stayed in Washington. (Guy passed away in 1938 in WA state).  Waldo (Wally) then migrated to Oregon for a short time and then settled in California.
This is a short snapshot of the Yates family migration from 1840 to the Present.

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