September 18, 2017

Documentation that John Nordgren’s middle name was Gormley

John Nordgren’s middle name was Gormley

This newest documentation is also proof that you should always revisit sites like Ancestry again and again, because new information is being added all the time. That’s where I found this birth record for my great aunt Edith Elvera Nordgren.

It’s a little hard to decipher the document because it doesn’t seem like a normal birth record. It doesn’t have any identifying official notations at the top of the page, other than “Register of Births in _______ County, State of Washington”. In looking at the locations where the children and their parents lived, it was quite a spread out area, but I suspect it was all in Whatcom County even though it’s not noted on the sheet.

Specifically, for Edith’s family the details for her, and them, are hard to read. What I can see is that Edith is listed with her full name, date of birth, gender, her mother’s name*, mother’s age and mother’s place of birth; in the line for her father it list his first and middle name**, age, and place of birth. It also lists the father’s vocation and who he is working for at the time.***

*The mother is listed as Anna Lena Anderson. This is Anna Lena’s married name, not her maiden name, which was Andreasdotter.

**Since Edith is listed as Edith Elvera Nordgren, but the year is 1907, that means that John G was already going by the surname of Nordgren which leads me to believe he had changed his surname from Andersson some time before. He came to America as Johan Andersson. His brother John Bernt went by the surname Larson. The mother of the two boys was Anna Lena Jönsdotter Larson who had also come to the United States. We know this because she is listed in census records, and she is buried in Minnesota. (Originally, the surname was probably Larsson when they were living in Sweden.

Also, keep in mind that John had filed more than once for Naturalization, and eventually made it in 1907. Was he already going by Nordgren because that was the name he filed under and did it for continuity?

***John Gormley Nordgren was listed as an Engineer working for C I Hood. I have not yet found the company in Washington State business records. It could have been an out of state company doing business here.

Still, some mysteries remain for John G Nordgren. We know he lost his hand somehow because my mom remembered that he had a hook prosthesis.

  • The oldest child, Andrew was born in Minnesota.
  • The next two children, Hulda (my grandmother) and Olive Josephine, were both born in Iowa. Why were they living in Iowa? What occupation was John working that allowed him to take his wife and little son to Iowa? Did they know someone there? Or, was it just there was a job he could do? This time frame is the late 1800s. My grandmother was born in 1896, her sister the next year.
  • The next child, Esther, was born in Sept 1899 in Bellingham, Washington. Sadly, Esther died in October of that same year. Great grandmother Anna Lena was under great stress (my assumption) by having to have two babies born right after each other while they were in Iowa, and then sometime after 1897 the family made another major move which took them from the Midwest (Iowa) to Washington State. Could that have contributed to the loss of the baby Esther? Or, was there some other reason like illness involved?

I do know that from Washington State birth records that all of the children born here were delivered by midwife. Two more children, Oscar and Edith were both delivered by that method. Midwifery in those days had to be somewhat more primitive than present day midwifery.

 

 

 

Amazing Desk Was Made Using Only Hand Tools

 

30 May 2010 017   30 May 2010 023

My Swedish Moline family members included two furniture makers, Johan Emil and Gunnar, father and son. I know no history of their education, nor do I have any furniture that they might have made, but from census records for the Seattle, Washington area I know that “Emil” was listed as a furniture refinisher, and his son owned Moline Furniture Company.  The photos above are Emil Moline on the top and his son Gunnar below him.

Seeing this Berlin Secretary Cabinet video today made me appreciate their skills even more.  In no way did they probably create anything so wonderful as this secretary cabinet, but who knows, there might be a piece of original Moline furniture work floating around out there.

1933 Seattle: Gunner Moline – Owner of Moline Furniture Co

The Value of City Directories for Genealogists

Many times we have to hunt through records using first names with one surname in order to document each family member. One way to speed up the process is to check city directories for the one surname and see which first names are listed. Many times you get lucky and find not only the family member’s name, but also their spouses too, as well as their occupation or place of employment.

In looking at the 1933 Seattle, Washington city directory I found almost all of my Moline family using this method. From this image I’m able to determine the address of my Great Uncle Gunner and his first wife Lillian Tapping Moline. The address for their furniture company can be compared to an envelope we have to see if the two are the same.

Also shown in this list is my G-Grandfather Emil J Moline and his second wife Hannah Wilhemina living in the long-time family home at 114 Boren Ave North.

There’s a bit of a mistake for the listing of my grandfather Elvin B. Moline. They have him listed as “Edwin”. He is living with is second wife Lillian Vera Epstein Moline at 202 North 42nd Ave.

Last, but not least, is my aunt Signie Moline who is shown to be a stenographer for Yamashita Shipping Company. At this time she is a renter at 1118 5th Ave.

When this directory was released it’s possible my grandparents had already moved to Bordeaux, Washington where they would reside from 1933 until 1941.

 

2011 Memorial Day – Veterans

Yates and Allied Families

 

Wilkerson and Allied Families

On every Memorial Day I remember all of my family members who have passed on. Not all of the people in this collage have passed, but many of them have.  I feel it’s important to thank our veterans whenever we can, and so I post this picture and thank our family members for their service.

If you are a member of either family and have served in the military, please come by and leave a comment with your branch of service and era in which you served.

 

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